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The Tale of the Arrow and the Feather_Santiago Ramon Garcia__ASM Global Video Challenge

Hundreds of antibiotics are on the market but only a few are effective to treat tuberculosis. Developing new drugs is a long (10-15 years) and expensive (~$800 millions) process. Identification of synergistic combinations using drugs approved for other therapeutic applications can allow the intr... Read More

It Touches Everything - Global Video Challenge Submission

My research is about a vaccine... Respiratory syncytial virus is the leading respiratory cause of hospitalization in infants and young children in the United States and in the world. There is still no vaccine licensed against this pathogen.
The major obstacle to vaccine development has been the... Read More

Breaking Big: Small scale studies on basic biology of bacteria may have a big impact on tick-borne disease research

Tick-borne diseases are a global health problem. Based on data from large cross-sectional surveys conducted in the U.S., the CDC increased estimates of Lyme disease incidence in 2012 from approximately 30,000 new cases to over 300,000 in 2012. In comparison, the CDC estimates roughly 56,000 annu... Read More

Global Video Challenge Submission - St.Paul's University

Submitted by Aila Gatlabayan,Quezon City, Philippines Read More

Scientists go with their gut for bacterial bio-fuel

Scientists in South Korea say they have produced gasoline from genetically modified Escherichia coli, a bacteria more commonly associated with food poisoning in humans. The researchers, from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, say their work could one day lead to a new and su... Read More

The Quest for a Field Guide to the Microbes - a talk by Jonathan Eisen

A talk by Jonathan Eisen for the "Science in the River City" gathering of science teachers. Read More

Pandemic Swine Flu Virus Found in Seals

The swine flu virus that caused a 2009 pandemic has been found in elephant seals off the central California coast, according to new research. The study, published in the journal PLoS ONE, is the first report of the virus H1N1 in any marine mammal. Researchers are now being advised to wear protec... Read More

How To Rid The Developing World Of Deadly Bacteria? Steam

By making water boil at much lower temperatures, scientists are using steam generated by the sun as a way sanitize things in places where unclean conditions often lead to disease and death.

Up to 2.5 billion people lack access to proper sanitation. They use "flying toilets" to dispose of excr... Read More

How Your Morning Commute Resembles a Fungus

In many fungi, the DNA storage compartments called nuclei are not prisoners of the cells they reside in, the way they are in animals and plants. Instead, fungal nuclei are free to move about the cabin. They flow through the joined, tube-shaped cells of fungi like busy commuters, and experience m... Read More

Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscope

The Foldscope is a fully functional microscope that can be laser- or die-cut out of paper for around 50 cents.

This bookmark-sized microscope can be assembled in minutes, includes no mechanical moving parts, packs in a flat configuration, is extremely rugged and can be incinerated after to s... Read More

Discover Your Inner Scientist: Wolbachia In Nashville 2013

A CNN iReport about an integrative lab series known as the Wolbachia in Nashville includes area high school students from School for Science and Math at Vanderbilt with the purpose of bringing real-world scientific research on microbes into high school biology classes. Angela Eeds, director with... Read More

How societal, economic factors play into rise of drug-resistant bacteria (PBS NewsHour video)

Has the age of antibiotics come to an end? New strains of bacteria are on the rise, landing normally healthy people in the hospital with life-threatening, drug-resistant infections. Ray Suarez talks to David Hoffman, the journalist who led the investigation for Frontline's "Hunting the Nightmare... Read More

2013 ICAAC Overview Briefing

Members of the ICAAC Program Committee present highlights by day of the ICAAC meeting and discuss sessions of particular interest. Host: Michael Schmidt, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC Participants: Craig E. Rubens, Seattle Children's Hospital Research Institute, Seattle... Read More

Freaky Fungus Could Help Feed the World

A Dutch bio-engineer says his lab-produced fungus could someday be used to save the lives of hungry people in the developing world.

But first, it might need some extra Rooster Sauce to make it go down easier.

"It has a very strong taste, a bitter aftertaste," says Hans van Leeuwen, a profe... Read More

Virus-derived particles target blood cancer

Ottawa researchers have developed unique virus-derived particles that can kill human blood cancer cells in the laboratory and eradicate the disease in mice with few side effects. The study is published in Blood Cancer Journal by co-senior authors Drs. David Conrad and John Bell of the Ottawa Hos... Read More

Alga takes first evolutionary leap to multicellularity

A single-celled alga has evolved a crude form of multicellularity in the lab – a configuration it never adopts in nature – giving researchers a chance to replay one of life's most important evolutionary leaps in real time.

This is the second time researchers have coaxed a single-celled organi... Read More

Massive mushrooms and zombie fungi

Giant woven willow sculptures of some of the UK's edible mushroom varieties have sprung up on the lawns at Kew Gardens in west London. Kew's experts look after the largest collection of dried fungi in the world - which also includes more sinister, inedible varieties.

Kew's fungarium is openin... Read More

Cold virus 'treats prostate cancer' for Birmingham patient (video)

A patient in Birmingham has undergone landmark gene therapy to treat prostate cancer.

The treatment, developed by doctors at University Hospital in Birmingham over the past 15 years, uses a virus modified from the common cold to deliver a powerful chemotherapy drug which at the same time stim... Read More

The microscopic world of corals [video]

Here's an amazing video from PBS Digital Studios' “Under H2O” series, with micro images of corals.

Corals are beautiful when seen through your own eyes in sunlight, but for scientists at the University of Hawaii, seeing corals in this manner is not enough. They are using a revolutionary new t... Read More

Ancient teeth reveal origin of the Justinian plague

The DNA of bubonic plague bacteria, blamed for Europe's great plague of 1348, has turned up in victims of a plague that shook the Roman world in AD 541
Read more: http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn24948
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