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Laser Tags Salmonella in Less Than a Day

A new laser sensor identifies Salmonella bacteria grown from food samples in less than 24 hours, about three times faster than conventional methods.

“BARDOT allows us to detect Salmonella much earlier and more easily than current methods,” says Arun Bhunia, professor of food science at Purdue... Read More

Nanotechnology and Learning to Talk to Bacteria: Reginald C. Farrow, Ph.D. at TEDxNJIT

The most well-known advances in nanotechnology have led to dramatically smaller devices that provide us very fast, compact and "smart" electronics including computers, cellphones, and games. In the process we have transformed the way that we communicate with each other. Along with these advances... Read More

CRE superbug cases found in at least 43 states

New York State hospitals will be required to report cases of antibiotic resistant bacteria called CRE. The CDC reports cases have been found in 43 states. Dr. Jon LaPook reports on the efforts being made to control the spread of the superbug that can infect the weakest patients.

Click "source... Read More

Merry Microbial Holidays!

Wishing every single microbial enthusiast and their families the merriest of microbial holidays! And how better than with bioluminescent ornaments on a Luxmas Tree! Read More

Microbiology at Home - ASM global video challenge

A microbiologist and mother of three young children shows how her fascination for microbiology impacts her family. Read More

Science Take: Bacteria's Private Line

The first of New York Times new Science Take series examines how a kind of bacteria can organize coordinated, wavelike attacks on prey using a stealth communication system.

Click "source" to VIEW VIDEO. Read More

Bacteriophage T4 (video)

This is an accurate visualization of the Bacteriophage T4 based on Cryo-EM datasets of the virus. The scope of the animation is to show the infection process of the T4 into an E. coli cell. All scientific data sets and motion based off of research from Michael Rossmann Laboratory (Purdue Univers... Read More

New Alien Life Claim Far from Convincing, Scientists Say

A new study that claims to present evidence of alien life is being met with a healthy dose of skepticism in the scientific community.

On July 31, a team of British researchers sent a balloon into the stratosphere over England, where it collected samples at an altitude range of 14 miles to 17 ... Read More

Salmonella Outbreak Out of Control

As the government shutdown lurches on, the Centers for Disease Control struggle to curb a West Coast salmonella outbreak.


 


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Clearing the BAR to oral vaccines

A new technology under development by an academic–industry partnership protects oral vaccines from destruction by the digestive system. From the mouth to the small intestine, the digestive system presents a series of challenges designed to protect us by killing ingested bacteria. If a microbe su... Read More

On the Curious Motions of Syphilis and Lyme Disease Bacteria

The bacteria that cause syphilis and Lyme Disease have something extraordinary in common: they manage to propel themselves through their environment in spite of the fact their tails are located inside their bodies.

For bacteria, they’re also unusually shaped and active. In this movie, you can... Read More

Scientists raise alarm over spread of Chikungunya virus

Scientists fear the mosquito-borne virus, Chikungunya, which has infected tens of thousands of people in Papua New Guinea, could spread to Australia.

The virus, which originated in Africa, is similar to dengue and causes debilitating joint pain, rashes and fever.

Amid an outbreak of the vi... Read More

Dissected 18-Foot Oarfish Filled with "Little Monsters"

Biologists dissected tissue samples from an oarfish carcass found in California and discovered the creature was hosting quite a few parasites.

“Our findings say that these are actually majorly parasitized fish,” says Armand Kuris, professor of zoology at the University of California, Santa Ba... Read More

Phage 'cocktail' wipes out 99 percent of E. coli in meat, spinach

Treating food products with select bacteriophages - viruses that target and kill bacteria - could significantly reduce concentrations of E. coli, a Purdue University study shows.

An injection of bacteriophages - also known informally as "phages" - nearly eradicated a toxin-producing strain of... Read More

The Secret and the Solution: Michael Schmidt, Ph.D., on the Antimicrobial Properties of Copper at TEDxCharleston

Michael Schimdt, Ph.D., Professor and Vice Chairman of Microbiology and Immunology, Director, Office of Special Programs, Medical University of South Carolina, gives a TEDx talk in Charleston, SC, about the antimicrobial properties of copper and how this mineral may significantly reduce hospital... Read More

Added Laser Makes Force Microscope 3D

Membrane proteins are the “gatekeepers” that allow information and molecules to pass into and out of a cell. Until recently, the microscopic study of these complex proteins has been restricted due to limitations of “force microscopes” that are available to researchers and the one-dimensional res... Read More

Scientists unlock evolution of cholera

Working with a nearly 200-year-old sample of preserved intestine, researchers at McMaster University and the University of Sydney have traced the bacterium behind a global cholera pandemic that killed millions – a version of the same bug that continues to strike vulnerable populations in the wor... Read More

Watching Bacteria Evolve, With Predictable Results

If we could somehow rewind the history of life to the dawn of the animal kingdom, it would be unlikely that we humans would ever evolve, the evolutionary biologist Stephen Jay Gould argued. The history of life was shaped by too many flukes and contingencies to repeat its course.

Scientists ca... Read More

Dr. Roy Curtiss, Biodesign Institute, "Turning a Foe into a Friend"

This video submission for the ASM Global Video Challenge highlights the impact of Salmonella-based vaccines on human health. Read More

Does medicine really need lab mice?

Using animals to test drugs destined for humans is controversial, with critics arguing there are other ways to ensure new medicines are safe and effective. But the scientists who carry out the research say animal studies remain necessary.

It is estimated that in the UK around three million mi... Read More

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