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Getting Started with MicrobeWorld

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Lung ultrasound may be a safe substitute for chest X-ray when diagnosing pneumonia in children

Lung ultrasound has been shown to be highly effective and safe for diagnosing pneumonia in children and a potential substitute for chest X-ray, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Results are currently published in the medical journal Chest. Read More

What is Open Access Publishing in Scientific Research?

A slide-cast by Jonathan Eisen, Professor at UC Davis and Academic Editor in Chief of PLoS Biology, about open access publishing given at the Clinical and Translational Science Center at UC Davis (http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/ctsc). Read More

The fifty shades of antibiotic resistance

Professor Dr. Luca Guardabassi gave the talk at Science and cocktail events on April 2015.
How many people die because of antibiotic resistance every year? Which people have a higher risk to die of bacterial infections? Is consumption of antibiotics in Danish livestock higher than in other cou... Read More

Student Thoughts On The First Day of Microbiology Class

I teach Microbiology at the University of Puget Sound every fall semester. The swiftly changing field of microbiology has depth and breath...and I was interested to learn what my students thought of the topic at the beginning of the first day of class. We will revisit this subject at the end o... Read More

Helicobacter Pylori: Bacteria Cause Cancer.

Dr. Nina Salama, microbiologist at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and Affiliate Associate Professor of Microbiology at the University of Washington discusses Helicobacter pylori, a bacterira that lives in the human stomach and causes chronic disease (peptic ulcer and gastric cancer).

... Read More

Antonie van Leeuwenhoek

Here's a nice historical video about Antonie van Leeuwenhoek from AJ Cann of the Microbiologybytes podcast at Microbiologybytes.wordpress.com. Read More

Antimicrobial resistance: a global health issue (Video)

How can antibiotics be better used? How can the development of resistance to antibiotics be avoided? What are the consequences of their ill-considered usage for humans and also for animals? These were some of the topics that the organizers of ICPIC 2013, the International Conference on Preventio... Read More

The neurons in our gut help the immune system keep inflammation in check ROCKEFELLER UNIVERSITY

The immune system exercises constant vigilance to protect the body from external threats--including what we eat and drink. A careful balancing act plays out as digested food travels through the intestine. Immune cells must remain alert to protect against harmful pathogens like Salmonella, but th... Read More

ASM GM 2014 - Bacteria in Urine Could Cause Overactive Bladder

Contrary to popular belief, urine is not sterile and the bacteria in it may be associated with overactive bladder (OAB) in some women. Presenters will discuss their research ... Read More

How Your Morning Commute Resembles a Fungus

In many fungi, the DNA storage compartments called nuclei are not prisoners of the cells they reside in, the way they are in animals and plants. Instead, fungal nuclei are free to move about the cabin. They flow through the joined, tube-shaped cells of fungi like busy commuters, and experience m... Read More

Bacteria rewired to flash in sync

Glowing bacteria that flash on and off together are pointing the way towards implants made of engineered cells that would deliver precise doses of drugs or hormones at specific times of the day.

The bacteria have been engineered to fluoresce in synchronised bursts to produce waves ... Read More

Jonathan Eisen - Mapping bacteria in your belly button and around the world (video)

Jonathan Eisen wants to make a field guide for microbes. Eisen, who is a professor at the University of California at Davis, likens what he wants to create to the field guides that exist for birds. With DNA sequencing and better tools, Eisen thinks we can map the diversity of microbes on humans ... Read More

Virtual bees help to unravel microbial and other causes of colony decline

What effect does the varroa mite, and the viruses it transmits, have on bee colonies? To find out, scientists have developed a new computer model to that simulates a honey bee colony over the course of several years.
Shown in the video on this page, the BEEHAVE model was c0-funded by BBSRC and... Read More

Metabolomics and microbes - Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

Entry for ASM global video challenge - short description of metabolomics work on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Read More

Better batteries through biology?

MIT researchers find a way to boost lithium-air battery performance, with the help of modified viruses.

Lithium-air batteries have become a hot research area in recent years: They hold the promise of drastically increasing power per battery weight, which could lead, for example, to electric c... Read More

Genome Signatures Enable Tracking of Algal Complexity

On the long and difficult road toward a carbon-neutral source of transportation fuels, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is pursuing a diversified approach. This effort involves exploring a range of potential new fuel sources in nature: from plants that may serve as cellulosic feedstocks—fast... Read More

Bacteria Communicate through Nanotubes (video)

Ben-Yehuda's group identified a previously uncharacterized type of bacterial communication mediated by nanotubes that bridge neighboring cells. The researchers showed that these nanotubes connect bacteria of the same and different species. Via these tubes, bacteria are able to exchange small mol... Read More

High-Speed Video: Coral-Killing Bacteria Caught in Action

Microscopic pathogens have been causing mass coral die-offs around the world. But now researchers are using high-speed video to spy on the behavior of killer microbes and potentially learn how to better manage coral disease.

“We finally have the tools to watch how bacteria behave in the ocean... Read More

Paul Ehrlich's Magic Bullets

AJ Cann from the Microbiology Bytes blog recommends an article in Wired on Paul Ehrlich's magic bullets. Read More

Alga takes first evolutionary leap to multicellularity

A single-celled alga has evolved a crude form of multicellularity in the lab – a configuration it never adopts in nature – giving researchers a chance to replay one of life's most important evolutionary leaps in real time.

This is the second time researchers have coaxed a single-celled organi... Read More
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