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Oregon geologist says Curiosity's images show Earth-like soils on Mars

Soil deep in a crater dating to some 3.7 billion years ago contains evidence that Mars was once much warmer and wetter, says University of Oregon geologist Gregory Retallack, based on images and data captured by the rover Curiosity.

NASA rovers have shown Martian landscapes littered with loos... Read More

Happy Luxmas 2015!

In this blogpost, I celebrate the microbiological season with some microbial merriment: ice nucleation bacteria, drawing with reporter gene bacteria, and painting with bioluminescent microbes. Every day is Luxmas to me! Read More

Cordyceps: attack of the killer fungi

The video shows an ant that is infected with a fungus called Ophiocordyceps unilateralis, which has both infiltrated and commandeered its body. While it devours the ant alive, it also sends its zombified host scurrying up a plant stem. The ant walks along the underside of a leaf and vigorously l... Read More

Science Take: Bacteria's Private Line

The first of New York Times new Science Take series examines how a kind of bacteria can organize coordinated, wavelike attacks on prey using a stealth communication system.

Click "source" to VIEW VIDEO. Read More

Animals (and Plants) in a Microbial World

In this blog post (and fourth "Mu-Tube" video), I explore the idea that all animals and plants have evolved as part of a microbial world, and thus microbes are a part of us. I do this by having my undergraduate students explore two recently publications by Dr. Margaret McFall-Ngai,and recording... Read More

We Are Not Alone: How the Human "Planet" Is Colonized (video)

The gut microbiome is an emerging field that has been linked to many diseases and conditions affecting each and everyone of us from metabolism to potential neurological diseases.

Via - YourekaScience on YouTube Read More

Dissected 18-Foot Oarfish Filled with "Little Monsters"

Biologists dissected tissue samples from an oarfish carcass found in California and discovered the creature was hosting quite a few parasites.

“Our findings say that these are actually majorly parasitized fish,” says Armand Kuris, professor of zoology at the University of California, Santa Ba... Read More

Modeling and predictive microbiology: Interview with An Vermeulen (Video)

An Vermeulen works at the Laboratory of Food Microbiology and Food Preservation of Ghent University. She is an industrial liaison officer for the laboratory as well as for the Flemish Cluster Predictive Microbiology in Foods, a cooperation between KULeuven and UGent, to improve the knowledge on ... Read More

Life’s Engines: How Microbes Made the Earth Habitable

Paul G. Falkowski, Distinguished Professor Rutgers University, Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences and Department of Geology, takes viewers deep into the microscopic world to explore how microbes made life on Earth possible—and how human life today would cease to exist without them. Read More

"Never Really Alone" with Rob Dunn

As part of my freshman writing seminar in the Fall of 2014, I was fortunate to have a number of fascinating experts in symbioses and parasitism be willing to "televisit" my students. Here is Dr. Rob Dunn of North Carolina State University, discussing his laboratory's work with Demodex face mite... Read More

Microorganism not yet cultivatable or difficult to cultivate in the laboratory

My global video challenge is about microorganism not yet cultivatable or difficult to cultivate in the laboratory. With new microorganism cultivation techniques is possible the discovery of new microorganisms. Read More

Supercomputer Modelling of a Complete Human Viral Pathogen: Poliovirus (Polio virus)

Follow the reconstruction and simulation of poliovirus using the BlueGene/Q supercomputer at the Victorian Life Sciences Computation Initiative. The poliovirus model is being used as a basis for understanding antiviral drugs, virus infection and helps us to learn how to model related viruses suc... Read More

Microbiology and Peep Science at Easter?

Easter in the United States has become a holiday pretty much about high fructose corn syrup. To that end, here is a description of "Peep Science," using those sugary creatures that inhabit this time of year. In addition is a video that links "Peep Science" and microbiology! Read More

Microbiology at Home - ASM global video challenge

A microbiologist and mother of three young children shows how her fascination for microbiology impacts her family. Read More

Life Under the Microscope: The Year’s Best Biology Close-Ups

Life is pretty interesting, and at the microscopic scale, it can also be beautiful, strange, intriguing, frightening and gross. The winning photos and videos from this year’s Olympus BioScapes competition span the whole range.

From rat brains to butter daisies to weevils and barnacle appendag... Read More

Does medicine really need lab mice?

Using animals to test drugs destined for humans is controversial, with critics arguing there are other ways to ensure new medicines are safe and effective. But the scientists who carry out the research say animal studies remain necessary.

It is estimated that in the UK around three million mi... Read More

Using microscopic bugs to save the bees

For decades, honeybees have been battling a deadly disease that kills off their babies (larvae) and leads to hive collapse. It’s called American Foulbrood and its effects are so devastating and infectious, it often requires infected hives to be burned to the ground.

Treating Foulbrood is comp... Read More

Video of virus-sized particle trying to enter cell

Tiny and swift, viruses are hard to capture on video. Now researchers at Princeton University have achieved an unprecedented look at a virus-like particle as it tries to break into and infect a cell. The technique they developed could help scientists learn more about how to deliver drugs via nan... Read More

How two microbes helped neuroscience

How two unlikely microbes led to the development of one of today's most promising brain research techniques -- optogenetics -- which is being used to study many diseases including schizophrenia and Parkinson's. Read More

Innocence by Viral Tagging - Finalist in Ocean 180 Video Challenge

Viruses are the most abundant biological entities on the planet with approximately 1030 in the world’s oceans at any time. As such, they play a central role in global nutrient cycling. Despite their ecological importance, little is known about how viruses interact with their hosts due to the dif... Read More
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