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TWiV 274: Data dump

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Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Read More

TWiM #73: Eyeing root nodule development

Hosts: Vincent RacanielloMichael Schmidt and Michele Swanson Read More

TWiM 73 Letters

Mark writes:


Hello Team TWiM,


I’ve followed with interest your coverage of Michael’s research into use of copper to fight hospital infection. Of all the interesting papers covered in 2013, I think the one most actionable is episode 55, The Copper Room. His res... Read More

Polio-like paralysis in California

Recently a number of children in California have developed a poliomyelitis-like paralysis. The cause of this paralysis is not yet known, and information about the outbreak is scarce. However, acute-flaccid paralysis is not uncommon (California would be expected to report about 75 cases a year, b... Read More

TWiV special: MERS-coronavirus in dromedary camels

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Host: Vincent Racaniello


Guests: Read More

MERS Virus Widespread in Saudi Arabian Camels (News Release)

The coronavirus responsible for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is prevalent in camels throughout Saudi Arabia and has been around for at least 20 years, according to a study to be published in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

“Our study ... Read More

Ice Nucleation Bacteria, Twitter, and Me!

In this post from my microbiology/education blog, I discuss a post on Boing Boing recently that used a video I had made of ice nucleation bacteria. Ice nucleation bacteria are very interesting of course, and I link to the Boing Boing post. In addition, I provide an additional video of students... Read More

BacterioFiles 156 - Killing Chemicals Cancel Chemotherapy Quality

This episode: Gut bacteria seem to be important for different kinds of anti-cancer chemotherapy treatments!


(9.4 MB, 10.25 minutes)


Show notes: 
News item<... Read More

TWiV 273: Lambda is not just a phage

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Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Read More

TWiP 67: They find each other delightful

 


Hosts: Vincent Racaniello and Dickson Despommier


Vincent and Dickson... Read More

TWiP 67 letters


CN writes:


Greetings Profs,


After having listened to your discussions on Plasmodium (TWiP 64), I explored papers on treatment options that are actually available. After having read some papers, I realized that one of the main roadblocks are the hypnozoite... Read More

How to give a great lecture

There are many elements that go into making a great lecture, but the most important one is to lose the notes. If you are giving lectures in a course at any level, the worst practice you can engage in is to rely on notes. This behavior is problematic for several reasons. You will not properly kno... Read More

On a Cellular Level, We Are ALL Overachievers!

In this blog post, I show a science-cartoon by the great "Beatrice the Biologist" that illustrates an important point in my freshman introductory cell and molecular biology course: no matter how tired we might be, we are incredibly busy on a cellular level! Beatrice is a fine artist who underst... Read More

Bacteriophage T4 (video)

This is an accurate visualization of the Bacteriophage T4 based on Cryo-EM datasets of the virus. The scope of the animation is to show the infection process of the T4 into an E. coli cell. All scientific data sets and motion based off of research from Michael Rossmann Laboratory (Purdue Univers... Read More

The Science Behind Honey’s Eternal Shelf Life

Modern archeologists, excavating ancient Egyptian tombs, have often found something unexpected amongst the tombs’ artifacts: pots of honey, thousands of years old, and yet still preserved. Through millennia, the archeologists discover, the food remains unspoiled, an unmistakable testament to the... Read More

Microbial biogeography of wine grapes is conditioned by cultivar, vintage, and climate

Wine grapes present a unique biogeography model, wherein microbial biodiversity patterns across viticultural zones not only answer questions of dispersal and community maintenance, they are also an inherent component of the quality, consumer acceptance, and economic appreciation of a culturally ... Read More

BacterioFiles Micro Edition 155 - Cells Save Superannuated Sequences

This episode: Bacteria are able to incorporate DNA from the environment into their genomes, even if it's thousands of years old!


(9.6 MB, 10.5 minutes)


Show notes: 
Read More

TWiV 272: Give peas a chance

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 Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Read More

Why do viruses cause disease?

Virulence, the capacity to cause disease, varies markedly among viruses. Some viruses cause lethal disease while others do not. For example, nearly all humans infected with rabies virus develop a disease of the central nervous system which ultimately leads to death. In contrast, most humans are ... Read More

BacterioFiles Micro Edition 154 - Improving Integration in Inherited Illness

This episode: Scientists figure out how to improve retroviral targeting in the genome, to make gene therapy safer!


(6.9 MB, 7.5 minutes)


Show notes: 
News ... Read More

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