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TWiV 285: Hokies go viral

Vincent meets up with XJ Meng and Sarah McDonald at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg to talk about their work on viruses of swine and rotaviruses.


Host: Vincent Racaniello


Guests: Read More

El podcast del Microbio Nº202: Miel contra las resistencias (Honey against resistance)



























El podcast del Microbio Nº202 summarize the recent finding that Manuka honey could be use to clear chronically infected wou... Read More

The Good-Enough Clockus of Prochlorococcus

Fine Reading: The Good-Enough Clockus of Prochlorococcus by Elio Schaechter from the Small Things Considered blog reviews a recent report from Ilka Axmann's lab in Berlin that concerns the marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus and it's biological clockworks.

"The authors propose that their da... Read More

El podcast del Microbio Nº199. Bichos espaciales (Space Bugs)



























El podcast del Microbio Nº199 conmemorates the 50th aniversary of Yuri Gagarin spaceflight by describing some "microbial si... Read More

DO’s and DON’Ts for Isolation of DNA and RNA from Biofilm

In a previous article, we discussed the basic characteristics of biofilm samples and factors that influence sample prep and handling. Today we want to share with you some very important tips for isolation of DNA or RNA from biofilm samples. After working with numerous different biofilms and bio... Read More

The Hand Microbiome: Your Real DNA Fingerprint

In the past 100 years we’ve learned that each one of us has unique fingerprints, and unique DNA sequences. Now through the Human Microbiome Project, we’re learning that every one of us has a unique and identifiable bacterial community not only inside of us, but also growing on our skin as well.... Read More

Use of adjuvants in H1N1 vaccine is cited as main reason for low vaccination rates for health care workers in Germany

"The emergence of the influenza A(H1N1)2009 virus provided a major challenge to health services around the world. However, vaccination rates for the public and for healthcare workers (HCWs) have remained low. We performed a study to review the reasons put forward by HCWs to refuse immunisation w... Read More

Colony Collapse Disorder: A Descriptive Study

A recent study published earlier this week from Washington State University suggests Nosema ceranae, a unicellular parasite, and pesticides embedded in old honeycombs are two major contributors to the bee disease known as colony collapse disorder. Now, the first descriptive epizootiological surv... Read More

Great ape protection act

The Great Ape Protection and Cost Savings Act (S 810), which would prohibit the use of chimpanzees in medical research, may be voted on in the Senate this week (it was approved by a Senate committee in July). The purpose of this act is to phase out invasive research on great apes and the use of ... Read More

Influenza is on the rise

December 2-5 is National Influenza Vaccination Week in the US. This year the push to immunize against flu comes as the disease has begun to increase substantially throughout the United States. A substantial rise in the number of influenza cases typically does not occur until the end of December... Read More

Animal breeders and suppliers of food rats may increase spread of Cowpox

German researchers suspect that a recent increase in human Cowpox infections in Germany may be spread through the handling of food rats (rodents used for feeding pets or zoo animals) and a decrease in small pox vaccinations among the general public in a PLoS One paper entitled "Cowpox Virus Outb... Read More

Squishy Science: Extract DNA from Smashed Strawberries

Fun science activity for kids!

Have you ever wondered how scientists extract DNA from an organism? All living organisms have DNA, which is short for deoxyribonucleic acid; it is basically the blueprint for everything that happens inside an organism’s cells. Overall, DNA tells an organism how ... Read More

El podcast del microbio Nº 222 y 223: Historia de Weber. (Weber's history)



























El podcast del Microbio Nº 222 and 223 summarize two articles published in Medical Mycology about the finding of the ecolog... Read More

TWiV 267: Snow in the headlights

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Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Alan Dove, Read More

Infectious Bite - The Vampire/Malaria Awareness Blog

I am always interested in how science or health communicators often use popular culture as a hook for drawing people into interesting research. Every morning I scan the "blogosphere," news sites and other sources for interesting stories or items to share on MicrobeWorld. Today I came across the ... Read More

Translación del poster

Ten years of virology blog

Ten years ago this month I wrote the first post at virology blog, entitled Are viruses living? Thanks to EE Giorgi for pointing out the ten year anniversary, and also for publishing an interview with me at her blog, Chimeras. Here is how this blog got started. Read More

What They Look Like


Some archaea look like little rods or tiny balls, and some even get around like bacteria, using long hair- or whip-like appendages called flagella that stick out of their cell walls and act like a microscopic outboard motor to get them where they are going.

... Read More

Everyone Rowing in the Same Direction

Is there such a thing as an obligatorily multicellular prokaryote? Merry Youle of the Small Things Considered blog reviews a recent paper published in the May issue of Applied and Environmental Microbiology that announces the finding of a new subgroup within magnetotactic multicellular prokaryot... Read More

Pushing the Thermodynamic Envelope into the Proteomic Edge

Tracey McDole, a PhD student in the lab of Dr. Forest Rohwer, San Diego State University, has authored a post on Small Things Considered that looks at recent research published in PNAS that questions the physical limits to cell behavior.

"The word marginal means to be at the outer or lower l... Read More

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