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El podcast del microbio Nº203: Antiguos eucariotas no marinos (earliest non-marine eukaryotes)



























El podcast del Microbio Nº203 is dedicated to Earth’s earliest non-marine eukaryotes, a discovery published in Nature journ... Read More

A short-short science fiction story about microbes...

From my microbiology-associated blog, where I discuss teaching and research in microbiology at a small liberal arts institution. Read More

Could a plant virus have found a way to infect humans?

It has always been assumed that plant viruses cannot infect animals, and vice versa, but plant viruses are known to be abundant in human faeces.

Now Didier Raoult at the University of the Mediterranean in Marseille, France, and his team think a pepper virus is making people sick, too.

They... Read More

BacterioFiles 167 - Gut Grows Gluten Gluttons

This episode: Some bacteria in the guts of healthy volunteers are able to break down gluten!


(9.7 MB, 10.5 minutes)


Show notes: 
Jour... Read More

TWiM #80: Hurling fleas and designer chromosomes

Hosts: Vincent RacanielloElio Schaechter, and Michele Swanson Read More

Glass microbes

I am always looking for microbe-themed art; I keep a list of my findings at Microbe Art. I’ve just discovered a new artist: Jane Hartman of Trilobite Glassworks. From her website: Trilobite Glassworks features stained glass and fused glass decorative as well as functional pieces all designed and... Read More

TWiM 62 Letters

Robert writes:
In TWIM #60 @1:06:23 Michael Schmidt suggests that glucose for fermentation from biomass is a necessary step in production of fuel ethanol. Fuel ethanol and other low molecular weight compounds can also be produced by autotrophic anaerobic fermentation of ... Read More

BacterioFiles 161 - Permafrost Produces Perceptible Pithos

This episode: The largest virus so far has been discovered in ancient Siberian permafrost!


(9.5 MB, 10.3 minutes)


Show notes: 
Read More

Hunters and Grazers

Most fungi can best be described as grazers, but a few are active hunters.

Hunter fungi prey on tiny protozoa and worm-like creatures called nematodes.

Some produce a sticky substance on their hyphae, which then act like flypaper, trapping passing prey.

Read More

XMRV not detected in seminal plasma

How XMRV, the new human retrovirus associated with prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome, might be transmitted among humans is unknown. The finding that the virus can be detected in prostate cancer cells, and in prostatic secretions of men with prostate cancer suggests that it could be se... Read More

Koch’s postulates in the 21st century

For thousands of years, epidemics of contagious diseases were believed to be caused by the wrath of the gods, configuration of stars, or miasma. The association of specific microorganisms with disease came about as a consequence of the work of the German physician Robert Koch. He formulated a se... Read More

TWiV 271: To bee, or not to bee, that is the infection

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Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Read More

How They Move

Some bacteria have hair- or whip-like appendages called flagella used to ‘swim’ around. Others produce thick coats of slime and ‘glide’ about. Some stick out thin, rigid spikes called fimbriae to help hold them to surfaces. Some contain little particles of minerals t... Read More

TWiV 125 Letters

Todd writes:


Hey Docs!


I'm a computer programmer who listens to podcasts on my long commute. The highest science education that I've had was college Chemistry. As an Electrical Engineer the science classes we took tended to not be biology oriented, so while so... Read More

TWiP 75: Parasite wonders with Bobbi Pritt

Bobbi Pritt joins Vincent and Dickson to talk about directing a clinical parasitology laboratory and her weekly case reports at Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites.


Hosts: Vincent Racaniello and  Read More

Universal influenza vaccines

The need to re-formulate the influenza virus vaccine in response to viral antigenic drift and shift makes for complex logistics of vaccine production and administration. Surveillance programs must be conducted each year to identify strains that are likely to predominate and cause disease. Wouldn... Read More

TWiV 241: The ferret looks ill



Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Alan Dove, ... Read More

A Guide to Swine Flu (SciAm)

As swine influenza reaches the U.S., a guide to what you need to know and what happens next. Plus, a look at pandemics past... Read More

Emerging Gastrointestinal Pathogen Linked With Human Fecal Contamination

A gastrointestinal pathogen associated with fecal contamination was present in 97 of 129 water samples taken from four beaches on the Lake Erie coast of Ohio according to research published in the August issue of Applied and Environmental Microbiology (click source to download a .pdf of the jour... Read More

Cyanobacteria: Growing a Green Future Around the Clock

Spencer Diamond and Britt Flaherty, PhD students at UCSD, Spencer in the Susan Golden Laboratory and Britt in the James Golden Laboratory, author a post on Small Things Considered about the green potential for cyanobacteria.

"With such famous bacteria as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtili... Read More

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