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TWiP 104: La maladie du sommeil

Michael returns to help the TWiP trio solve the case of the Delusional African Expatriate, who then discuss the association of natural and induced antibodies in mice with differential susceptibility to secondary cystic echinococcosis.


Hosts:  Read More

BacterioFiles 244 - Rabbit Viruses Exploding Cancer

This episode: A conversation with Audiommunity hosts about a rabbit virus that may help treat cancer while preventing the treatment from killing the patient!


(39.2 MB, 42.9 minutes)


Show notes: 
Read More

TWiP 89 letters


Robin writes:


Cerebral cysticercosis
.....


(trichinosis?)


Left shift:
This is from the days when dinosaurs roamed the earth:
Manual counters for the differential count had the buttons left to right for neutrophils, bands, eosinophil... Read More

TWiP 103: Scroll down, please

The TWiP-scholars solve the case of the Housewife from Kolkata, discuss mutations in the IL17 gene associated with cerebral malaria, and hear a case presentation from guest Michael Libman.


Hosts:  Read More

TWiV 379: A mouse divided

Hosts: Vincent RacanielloDickson DespommierAlan Dove Read More

Bat SARS-like coronavirus: It’s not SARS 2.0!

A study on the potential of SARS-virus-like bat coronaviruses to cause human disease has reawakened the debate on the risks and benefits of engineering viruses. Let’s go over the science and then see if any of the criticisms have merit. Read More

TWiV 340: No shift, measles

Hosts: Vincent RacanielloDickson DespommierAlan Dove Read More

TWiM #125: A minimal cell operating system

A deep sequencing study of commercially available probiotics, and design and synthesis of a minimal bacterial genome are the topics tackled by Vincent, Michael, and Michele on this episode of TWiM.


Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Read More

TWiV 342: Public epitope #1

 Hosts: Vincent RacanielloDickson DespommierAlan Dove Read More

TWiV 339: Herpes and the sashimi plot

Hosts: Vincent RacanielloAlan Dove, and Kathy Spindler Read More

TWiV 336: Brought to you by the letters H, N, P, and Eye

 Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler


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The TWiVsters explore mutations in the interferon pathway associated with severe influenza in a child... Read More

New American Academy of Microbiology Report provides recommendations for implementing NGS to clinical microbiology settings

This morning, the American Academy of Microbiology released a report, “Applications of Clinical Microbial Next-Generation Sequencing.” An event was held at the National Press Room to highlight its release. You can read more about the event here, or go here to read recommendations on NGS in a cli... Read More

TWiP 105: Survival of the fattest

The TWiPanosomes solve the case of the Young Man from Anchorage, and discuss how cestode parasites increase the resistance of brine shrimp to arsenic toxicity.


Hosts: Vincent Racaniello Read More

TWiP 106: Trematode stormtroopers in snail wars

The TWiP triumvirate solves the case of the Missionary in Kenya, and review the finding of a soldier caste in flatworms that parasitize snails.


Hosts: Vincent Racaniello Read More

Register now for free Mysterious Microbes webinar series starting Jan 14

Want to learn more about the most abundant, diverse, and hidden life on Earth?

Attend the FREE Mysterious Microbes Public Webinar Series and Educator Workshop hosted by CIRES Education Outreach!

These free events feature the cutting-edge research of leading microbial scientist Noah Fierer ... Read More

A biofilm model that accounts for cell aggregates

Whether you’ve Google-searched “biofilm” to learn more yourself, taken courses covering the subject, or are deeply embedded in biofilm-related research, you’ve probably encountered a model similar to the one below, which represents biofilm maturation. In the current model, a biofilm begins with ... Read More

Microbial communication over the airwaves

Jean-Paul Latgé originally wanted to know if he could test the breath of patients with Aspergillus infections for volatile compounds produced by the fungus. His group at the Pasteur Institute in Paris thought this might be a new way of diagnosing fungal culprits like Aspergillus fumigatus that o... Read More

Whole-genome sequencing can help ID hospital outbreaks

Drug-resistant infections are becoming one of the scariest epidemics since the advent of antibiotic discovery. Although microbes like methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae, and multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa are responsible for... Read More

Smartphone adapted for use as a video microscope to detect parasites in blood in under resourced communities

This is a good news story all around. UC Berkeley engineers, Michael D'Amrosio and Matthew Bakalar (UC Berkeley Bioengineering) with medical personal from NIAID, Dr. Thomas Nutaman and his collaborators from Cameroon and France collectively took the omni-present global resource, a standard smar... Read More

TWiV 380: Viruses visible in le microscope photonique

Hosts: Vincent RacanielloDickson DespommierAlan Dove Read More

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