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June 2011 Microbe Feature article--Bat White-Nose Syndrome in North America

The June 2001 issue of Microbe magazine is now online, including the feature article
Bat White-Nose Syndrome in North America
by David S. Blehert, Jeffrey M. Lorch, Anne E. Ballmann, Paul M. Cryan, and Carol U. Meteyer

Since 2007, infections by a previously unrecognized, perhaps imported... Read More

Understanding cell organization

Franklin M. Harold, Department of Microbiology, University of Washington has authored an interesting guest post on www.SmallThingsConsidered.us that examines the process of cell structural organization and assembly:

"Structural organization is one of the most conspicuous features of cells, a... Read More

All about oomycetes - fine reading

The Small Things Considered blog has just started a three-part series on oomycetes, also known as water molds.

The first piece (published today) describes oomycete biology, the other two will focus on a particular oomycete: the late potato blight pathogen.

Here's a clip:

"As you know, ... Read More

TWiV 157: Better innate than never

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Hosts: Vincent RacanielloR... Read More

TWiV 150: Contaminated

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Hosts: Vincent RacanielloR... Read More

TWiV 142 Letters

TWiV 142


Marshall writes:


Dear TWiV hosts,


I'm sure you've already heard about this, but I was curious what your take on this study is.


Read More

Preparing for the Flu: A Childcare Communications Toolkit

The CDC has just published "Preparing for the Flu: A Communication Toolkit for Child Care and Early Childhood Programs." A .pdf document that provides information and communication resources to help center-based and home-based child care programs, Head Start programs, and other early childhood p... Read More

TWiV 124 Letters

Norm writes:


First, I love your podcasts.


You guys are constantly grousing about the lack of research funding.


I was curious.


NIH, funding has risen every year since 2000, from $17B to the current $31B (supports 325,000 researchers)


NSF... Read More

TWiV 110 Letters



Jay writes:


Looks like the polio outbreak in the Congo is pretty bad.


http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5jpSHvrTg3sqCZs9hPXwYsuwAjXNA?docId=CNG.29d0fd00722f6f7964062dad40b4f107.ca1


http://www.unicef.org/me... Read More

TWiV 115 Letters

Vinayaka writes:


Some additional info that I gathered on viruses on the verge of elimination (may or may not be new to you):


It appears that the next virus on the list of FAO to eradicate is PPR virus ( Read More

TWiV 101 Letters

Russ writes:


I think this image from www.3d4medical.com is great!


This is a cool app for the iPad. This would make a great pick of the week


Russ


Julian writes:<... Read More

XMRV and CFS – It’s not the end

Yesterday the Chicago Tribune published my reaction to the four papers on the retrovirus XMRV published this week in the journal Retrovirology. I was quoted as saying ”These four papers are probably the beginning of the end of XMRV and CFS”. I wish to retract this statement and explain my reason... Read More

TWiV 162 Letters

Sarah writes:


Hello to the TWiV crew,


Here are a couple of picks I thought would be good for provoking thought and generating discussion...


While working on a project, I came across some papers attempting to define what "critical thinking" means. I app... Read More

The dwindling American science majors

According to the New York Times (Why Science Majors Change Their Minds), the decline in the number of science majors in the United States has come about in part because the subject matter is too difficult. If this explanation is true, then we have not properly prepared these students in grades K... Read More

Viral bioinformatics: Introduction + Homology

First, you may be asking yourself – Why viral bioinformatics? Good question! Although it’s true that much in the world of bioinformatics can be applied to all manner of protein and DNA sequences, there are a number of resources that are specific for viruses and there are a number of analyses tha... Read More

Influenza H5N1 virus versus ferrets, round two

The second of two papers on avian influenza H5N1 virus that caused such a furor in the past year was published today in the journal Science. I have carefully read the paper by Fouchier and colleagues, and I assure you that it does not enable the production of a deadly biological weapon. The resu... Read More

A Giant Among Giants

Merry Youle from the Small Things Considered blog ponders the potential size a virus can be:

"With such fascinating stories being told by Mimivirus and the other giants, people are now looking for them in more environments. Modified techniques are called for, as those used previously to spot ... Read More

It's Raining Viruses

It’s true! Each year it rains viruses, more than a trillion of them per acre over thousands of forested acres in the USA. This is the work of the airborne arm of the USDA Forest Service, part of their efforts to reduce the devastation to hardwood forests caused by the imported gypsy moth, Lymant... Read More

Genome of arsenic bacterium sequenced

The genome nucleotide sequence has been determined of the bacterium GFAJ-1, which has been suggested to survive in high levels of arsenic and in fact incorporate arsenic into macromolecules. The sequence does not address the controversy over whether the bacterium can utilize arsenic. I suppose t... Read More

TWiV 156 Letters

Kevin writes:


Dear Professor Racaniello,


I have just seen some of the ridiculous comments regarding the picture which was posted on your TWiV website.


I have had CFS for over 16 years. I am a very firm believer in scientific method and... Read More

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