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TWiP 22 Letters

Luca writes:

Hi Vince and Dick,

I am an avid listener of your podcast (and Twiv, too) - I started something like six months ago and I've retrieved all those whose title sounded interesting. I am not a parasitologist myself, though I am a pharmaceutical (computational) chemist with a deep interest in biology and virology. My passion for parasitology blossomed upon reading "Parasite Rex" by Carl Zimmer, and was re-stoked by your wonderful podcast. By the way, that book would definitely make for a wonderful pick of the week. Please excuse me if my english may seem a bit long-winded, but my brain is wired for Italian, where long, convoluted, interdependent phrases are the norm. And even after ten years of life abroad I can't seem to shake the habit.

I was listening to your latest when you were talking about the scientists of Antwerp's Tropical Disease Institute and their attempt at fighting L. Congolense. I happen to live in Mechelen, a Belgian city halfway between Brussel and Antwerp. One of you two (Dick, perhaps) suggested raising zebras and eland for meat rather than cows, in Africa. I believe this is already happening, although in a limited fashion. Africa is probably a bit too far for meat grown there to reach you, or maybe American habits are different. Here in Belgium, it's rather easy to find zebra's, ostrich, antelope's and even crocodile's meat in most supermarket. The origin is usually South Africa, where I believe they're farmed or at least reared in semi-wilderness. Needless to say, I've tried them all... As a native of the mediterranean island of Sardinia, I am deeply passionate about thin sliced horse meat quickly roasted on the fire, seasoned with garlic, olive oil and spicy 'peperoncino', or chili as it
's known to you. I am probably a very good parasite host, since I like my meat almost rare and when abroad I nibble on wild plants, from Rwanda to Turkey. What's the point is going to see Gorillas if you don't try their wild celery?

Thanks so much for your effort in diffusing your knowledge, I'll keep listening and will suggest your podcast to my research group and people in compoanies who sometimes are hard-pressed to find the time to keep abreast of interesting literature.

As for This week in Physics, I guess that field is pretty well covered by the various Nature and Science Podcasts and the likes of them... What's hard to find in my opinion is a decent podcast in the field of drug dveelopment. Nature runs a couple but they're sporadically updated, so they don't cut it for me. If you have any suggestion...

All the best with your endeavour

Luca

Debora writes:

You were going to describe how the trichuris trichuria causes anemia; not from blood sucking, but you mentioned within the bone? But you never elaborated. Could you explain?

I've been using necator americanus for my Crohn's disease with good success for 3 years now. I lose my worms within 6 months, however, and the Crohn's returns. I recently tried adding trichuris suis ova, and had a very negative reaction, which was unexpected.

You made a few mistakes about Crohn's... it is not located only to the colon, it can affect the entire digestive track, from mouth to anus. Ulcerative colitis is colon only. Both are IBD, and both trichuris and hookworms are being investigated currently as "therapy" .

Thank you for your interesting information and for mentioning the hygiene hypothesis. I learned more about whipworms and would like to hear more their relationship with allergy and autoimmunity.

Herbert writes:

I was also able to achieve remission from Crohn's after getting hookworms and whipworms. You can follow my progress here: http://www.facebook.com/Helminthic.Therapy?v=wall
Also, there's a wiki page that contains a ton of information on this topic, including helminthic therapy providers: http://opensourcehelminththerapy.org
A whole lot of research articles on helminthic therapy can be found here: http://goo.gl/CFsY

Richelle writes:

Thank you Vincent and Dickson for your fantastic podcast. I am a police officer with a hobby in science. Trying to squeeze in some study and was in a panic about how I would cram for my microbiology exam next Thursday since work is sending me away for 4 days. I will be sitting in airports for much of that time. But now I have all of TWiP and many TWiV. I already listened to them all but will listen over and over while I am away. I wish you had more on schistosomas and fungi. I love the history you include in your information and also the references to scientists currently working on various things. Vincent asks almost all of my questions. I hope you dont get bored doing these podcasts because I will be a faithful follower from now on. I looked to vote for you in the podcast awards but you weren't there. I voted for the Brain Science Podcast instead. Am sure you will be there next year.

Love from Richelle in Canberra.

 

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