The Dish

The Dish

koshland-dish Join MicrobeWorld and the Marian Koshland Science Museum for The Dish, a Café Scientifique style event that you can attend in person if you are in Washington, D.C. area or view online here.

Rather than listening passively to a scientist discuss his or her work, the idea behind "The Dish" is to encourage audience members, in person and online, to ask questions and dig deeper into a particular subject area. The goal of the conversation between the scientist and the audience is not only to inform and entertain but to increase both the expert's and non-expert's understanding of the issues in a casual atmosphere.

Inside the Mind's Eye: Communicating Science in a New Media Era

Blogs, podcasts, and other new media outlets have changed the way people get their news. Immediate access to information presents new opportunities as well as challenges for science communication. Join Carl Zimmer for a discussion of how scientists and braincuttingsjournalists use new media outlets while avoiding their pitfalls. During the program, Carl Zimmer will share his latest book, Brain Cuttings: Fifteen Journeys Through the Mind.

When: Thursday, October 14, 2010
Where: Koshland Science Museum, 6th and E Streets, NW, Washington, D.C.
Time: 6:30 PM to 8:00 PM EST, Free
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RSVP recommended. Contact the Koshland Science Museum at 202-334-1201 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to reserve your seat.

Watch and Participate Online

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To ask Carl Zimmer a question tweet @microbeworld or use the hashtag #koshland.

Carl Zimmer is an award-winning author and science journalist. He is the author of seven books, the most recent of which is The Tangled Bank: An Introduction to Evolution. In addition to writing books, Zimmer contributes articles to the New York Times, as well as to magazines including National Geographic, Time, Scientific American, Science, and Popular Science. He also writes an award-winning blog, The Loom. From 1994 to 1998 Zimmer was a senior editor at Discover, where he remains a contributing editor and writes a monthly column about the brain. Zimmer also hosts Meet the Scientist, a podcast from the American Society for Microbiology.

This program held in collaboration with the American Society for Microbiology.


Do We Need a Climate Solution for Indoors?

We typically spend close to 90 percent of our time inside - at school, work and home. While outdoor air quality is very important, so too is the quality of the air we breathe at home and the office. Yet most of us know very little about the condition of our indoor climate.  The chemicals that we breathe, ingest or absorb through our skin today are quite different from those to which our parents and grandparents were exposed. Join researcher Charles J. Weschler, (UMDNJ-RWJM), for a conversation on the marked changes in indoor air quality over the last 50 years.

This program was made possible by a Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) from the National Center for Research Resources, a component of the National Institutes of Health.

This program was held in collaboration with Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

About The Dish

Rather than listening passively to a scientist discuss his or her work, the Koshland Science Museum's "The Dish" is similar in concept to a Café Scientifique in which audience members are encouraged to ask questions and dig deeper into a particular subject area. The goal of the conversation between the scientist and the audience is not only to inform and entertain but to increase both the expert's and non-expert's understanding of the issues in a casual atmosphere.

Finding Patient Zero

Tracing the origin of an outbreak is a critical clue in curing a disease.  But how can scientists track the beginnings of malaria, a disease that has been around for millions of years? Watch researcher Nathan Wolfe (Stanford University) as he discusses how his team was able to discover the origin of malaria - which still kills thousands each year - and how their findings might aid in developing a malaria vaccine.

The Dish was created by the Marian Koshland Science Museum and is made possible by a Science Education Partnership (SEPA) grant from the National Center for Research Resources, a component of the National Institutes of Health. This program was held in collaboration with the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Nathan Wolfe's talk was filmed live on March 17, 2010 at Busboys & Poets in Washington, DC.

Upcoming

The Dish: Do We Need a Climate Solution for Indoors?
Wednesday, April 21, 2010, Busboys and Poets, 5th and K St, NW (Map), 6:30 PM to 8:00 PM EST, Free | Add to Google Calendar

We typically spend close to 90 percent of our time inside - at school, work and home. While outdoor air quality is very important, so too is the quality of the air we breathe at home and the office. Yet most of us know very little about the condition of our indoor climate.  The chemicals that we breathe, ingest or absorb through our skin today are quite different from those to which t our parents and grandparents were exposed. Join researcher Charles J. Weschler, (UMDNJ-RWJM), for a conversation on the marked changes in indoor air quality over the last 50 years. (More)

Adaptation and Evolution: The Life of an RNA Virus (MWV35)

From the flu to HIV, RNA viruses challenge our immune systems like no other infectious agent on the planet. RNA viruses provide unique insights into the patterns and processes of evolutionary change in real time. The study of viral evolution is especially topical given the growing awareness that emerging and re-emerging diseases (most of which are caused by RNA viruses) represent a major threat to public health. How do RNA viruses adapt and change, and how do our bodies respond? Why are diseases like HIV so difficult to predict and contain?

In episode 35 of MicrobeWorld Video, Eddie Holmes, professor in Biology at Pennsylvania State University leads a discussion before a live audience at Busboys & Poets in Washington, D.C. on the genetics and evolution of RNA viruses and how we can combat them.

The Dish was created by the Marian Koshland Science Museum and is made possible by a Science Education Partnership (SEPA) grant from the National Center for Research Resources, a component of the National Institutes of Health. This program was held in collaboration with the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Alternate File Types

iPod/iPhone/Apple TV (587 megs |.m4v)
Quicktime (281 megs | .mov)
MPEG-4 (512 megs | .mp4)
Windows Media Player (718 megs | .wmv)
DIVX (523 megs | .divx)
MP3 Audio Only (47 megs | .mp3)

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