ASM's Microbes After Hours

In May 2012, the American Society for Microbiology launched a new Happy Hour series called “Microbes After Hours” which gathers together scientists and curious citizens at ASM headquarters in Washington DC for relaxed evenings of appetizers, local brews and exciting microbiology talks by renowned experts.  Since the inaugural session, the series has tackled topics such as “Microbes and Microbrews: the Microbiology of Brewing Beer,” “The Human Microbiome: My Microbes, Myself,” and “The Return of Influenza.”  The series has grown beyond its local roots to bring together scientists and enthusiastic learners from all over the globe through live broadcasts on MicrobeWorld.

Microbes After Hours: This Week in Virology LIVE - Zika Virus

A special live episode of the popular science podcast This Week in Virology at the headquarters of the American Society for Microbiology. Podcast host Vincent Racaniello will hold a conversation with four leading experts on flaviviruses to discuss what we know about the emerging pathogen Zika virus and the state of ongoing research.

There is limited seating and attendance is expected to sell out fast. The live podcast will start promptly at 6 p.m. (please arrive early). If you are not in the Washington, D.C. area, you can watch live online at ASM's YouTube channel.

Date

Tuesday, May 31, 2016 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT) 

RSVP to attend in person

Eventbrite - Microbes After Hours: This Week in Virology LIVE - Zika Virus

LOCATION

American Society for Microbiology
1752 N Street, NW Washington, DC 20036
(See it on Google Maps)

Watch - Live Stream Starts at 6 pm EDT (22:00 UTC)

(To ask a question please post it in the chat on our YouTube page or tweet it using the hash tag #asmzika.)  

Guests


michael diamond200x200Michael S. Diamond, MD, PhD
Professor of Medicine, Molecular Microbiology, Pathology & Immunology
Associate Director, Center for Human Immunology and Immunotherapy Programs
Washington University in St. Louis

The research in the Diamond laboratory focuses on the interface between viral pathogenesis and the host immune response for several globally important mosquito-borne human pathogens, including West Nile, Dengue, Zika, and Chikungunya viruses. We are interested in defining mechanisms of innate immune restriction and viral immune evasion as well as developing animal models of pathogenesis. We also study the structural and molecular bases of antibody-mediated protection of flaviviruses and alphaviruses, with a goal of identifying broadly neutralizing antibodies and their respective epitopes.

 

Michaela Gack200x200Michaela U. Gack, PhD
Associate Professor of Microbiology
The University of Chicago

Dr. Gack's research focuses on understanding how the intricate interplay between viruses and the host's immune system impacts the outcome of viral infection and disease. Understanding host-virus interactions at a molecular level is an essential step in developing safe and effective antivirals and vaccines. A long-term goal of her research is to identify the strategies employed by viral pathogens – influenza virus, dengue virus and several tumor viruses – to escape cell-intrinsic immune responses. She is also identifying and functionally characterizing novel host factors that play important roles in the antiviral immune defense.

 

kramer laura 200x200Laura Kramer, PhD
Director of the Arbovirus Laboratory
Wadsworth Center
New York State Department of Health

Professor
School of Public Health
State University of New York, Albany

The research program of the Arbovirus Laboratories focuses on basic and applied field and laboratory studies examining how the interactions between arthropod vectors, viruses, and vertebrate hosts are affected by biotic and abiotic factors; and how these interactions impact the intensity of viral transmission, and subsequently viral evolution and adaptation. Dr. Kramer is also a Virology moderator for ProMED mail, an emerging diseases early warning alert under the umbrella of the International Society of Infectious Diseases.

 

CharlesMRice200x200Charles M. Rice, PhD
Maurice R. and Corinne P. Greenberg Professor in Virology
The Rockefeller University

In the Laboratory of Virology and Infectious Disease, Dr. Rice is interested in understanding how viruses propagate, ways in which they interact with host cells, and how they cause disease. He is one of the world's most accomplished virologists and a prominent figure in research on members of the Flaviviridae including hepatitis C virus (HCV). His laboratory, as well as others, developed cell culture infectious systems for HCV that drastically increased our ability to study this important pathogen.

 

 

Microbes After Hours – Missing Microbes with Dr. Martin Blaser

Why are obesity, juvenile diabetes and asthma increasing? Is it something in the environment or in our modern lifestyle? Dr. Martin Blaser thinks that it may be due to changes in our microbiome – the ecosystem of tiny microscopic creatures that live in and on us. Learn about his hypothesis that some of the greatest medical advances in the 20th century – antibiotics, C-sections and antiseptics- may be having unintended consequences. Dr. Blaser will speak about his book "Missing Microbes: How the Overuse of Antibiotics is Fueling Our Modern Plagues." The talk will be followed by a reception and book signing.

Date

Thursday, January 28, 2016, 6 – 8 p.m.

Location
American Society for Microbiology
1752 N Street, NW Washington, DC 20036
(See it on Google Maps)

Watch

 

 

 

About Martin Blaser, MD


Martin J BlaserDr. Martin Blaser has studied the role of bacteria in human disease for over 30 years. He is the director of the Human Microbiome Program at NYU. He founded the Bellevue Literary Review and has been written about in newspapers including The New Yorker, Nature, Science, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Wall Street Journal. His more than 100 media appearances include The Today Show, The Daily Show, Fresh Air (NPR) GMA, the BBC, The O'Reilly Factor, and CNN. He lives in New York City. You can read more about his book "Missing Microbes" at martinblaser.com.

 

Microbes After Hours – Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria

In 2011, the NIH Clinical Center had a cluster of infections of a pathogen that tops the CDC's list of urgent threats: antibiotic-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. This bacteria, which can cause bloodstream and other infections, has recently developed resistance to the class of antibiotics known as carbapenems. The outbreak at NIH started with a single infected patient who was discharged weeks before any other cases were detected. This story of antibiotic-resistant infections is becoming more common around the world, and is especially dangerous in hospitals. Dr. Julie Segre, a senior investigator at the National Human Genome Research Institute, will discuss how the outbreak was traced using state-of-the-art DNA sequencing.

The Elizabeth O. King Lecture is made possible by The New York Community Trust-The Audrey Rheinstrom and Anne Blevins Fund.

Note: In-person event sold out. Add your name to the waitlist at https://goo.gl/luFSkn. You can watch the live stream of the event below.

Thursday, June 25, 2015, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
American Society for Microbiology
1752 N Street, NW Washington, DC 20036
Space is limited | RSVP is required
Livestream starts at 6:00 p.m. ET | 22:00 UTC

Watch

(To ask a question please post it in the chat or tweet it using the hash tag #asmlive. ASM Live is now mobile friendly.)

Microbes After Hours – Ebola: On the Front Lines

The current Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa has sickened over 13,000 people and has killed over 4,800. Health workers from around the world are attempting to halt this deadly disease. On November 19th, Microbes After Hours will feature two of these health workers, Dr. Joseph Fair and Dr. Michael Callahan, who have extensive experience with the virus, including direct field work during the current outbreak. They will discuss the virus, the response, and potential solutions during a talk, followed by a Q & A with the audience. Please click here to RSVP to attend the event in person at ASM Headquarters or watch the live stream of the event below. 

Wednesday, November 19, 2014, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
American Society for Microbiology
1752 N Street, NW Washington, DC 20036
Space is limited | RSVP is required
Livestream starts at 6:00 p.m. ET | 22:00 UTC

(Click here to watch the promotional trailer.)

Watch Below

 

Speakers

 

Fair headshotDr. Joseph Fair is virologist, specializing in viral hemorrhagic fevers, and seasoned public health professional with extensive experience conducting high-impact public health and research programs in Africa, Asia, Europe and Eastern Europe (FSU). He is an adviser for Foundation Mérieux and was a founder and former Vice President of Metabiota, Incorporated, where he initiated and developed a 30 million dollar research and development portfolio.

While at Metabiota he personally responded to outbreaks of Ebola virus in the Democratic Republic of Congo, and in Sierra Leone and Liberia, serving as the US Interagency Coordinator in West Africa. Recently, he was a consultant at the World Health Organization headquarters in Sierra Leone responding to the current Ebola outbreak.

Having trained under Nobel Laureate Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, and virology CJ Peters, Dr. Fair has traveled the World looking for pathogenic viruses in their endemic settings, and is considered a subject matter expert in emerging infectious diseases in Sub-Saharan African and public health program implementation.



callahanDr. Michael Callahan is the President and Chief Medical Officer of Unither Virology, and a practicing tropical and disaster medicine physician at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston. Dr. Callahan has worked for 19 years in disease outbreak response under U.S. Federal Charter Rescue Medicine, Rapid UK, the World Health Organization and prior to 2005, under the UNHCR. His global outbreak response deployments include Ebola, Marburg, H5N1, SARs and H7N9. He was awarded the 2008 DARPA Achievement Award for his technologic breakthrough in the rapid, large scale manufacture of emergency vaccines and infectious disease countermeasures. He has a wide range of biodefense experience, advising both senior government officials from the State Department to Department of Defense, as well as academic intuitions on nonproliferation, drug & vaccine development and technology transfer toward combatting emerging infectious diseases and bio threat agents.

Dr. Callahan will speak to his most recent deployment in support of clinical surveillance of the Ebola outbreak in Liberia and beyond.

 

Microbes After Hours – The Water Supply

Creating and maintaining a clean, sustainable water supply means delivering drinking water and collecting wastewater while dealing with pathogenic microorganisms and infrastructure challenges. It's not all challenges, however. Two speakers; Sudhir Murthy, PhD, PE, BCEE, Innovation Chief at DC Water, and Kellogg Schwab, PhD, Director of the Johns Hopkins University Water Institute, will speak to Microbes After Hours about promising new endeavors in water management as well as issues of water safety.

October 8, 2014, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
American Society for Microbiology
1752 N Street, NW Washington, DC 20036
Space is limited | RSVP is required

Watch Below

 

Speakers

  • Sudhir Murthy, PhD, PE, BCEE, Innovations Chief, DC Water
    How DC Water Addresses Microorganisms in Water: A US Water Utility Perspective

  • Kellogg Schwab, PhD, Director, Johns Hopkins University Water Institute
    International Issues of Water Safety with a Specific Focus on the Presence of Pathogens Including Norovirus in the Water Supplies of Developing Countries

  • Watch This Week in Virology Episode 300 Live from ASM HQ Aug 26 7 pm ET

    This Week in Virology, the podcast about viruses, celebrates its 300th episode on Tuesday, August 26, 2014 with a live recording at the Washington, DC headquarters of the American Society for Microbiology. This special episode will be part of the ‘Microbes after Hours’ series, and will feature the TWiV hosts Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler recording together in person for the first time.

    Tuesday, August 26, 2014
    Reception from 6-7 P.M.
    TWiV 300th Episode Live from 7-8:30 P.M.
    RSVP required to attend in person

    Watch Live



    (To ask a question please post it in the chat or tweet it using the hash tag #twiv300. ASM Live is now mobile friendly.)

    The Hosts of This Week in Virology

  • Vincent Racaniello, Ph.D. (@profvrr) is Professor of Microbiology at Columbia University Medical Center and is the Chair of the ASM Communications Committee.

  • Dickson D. Despommier, Ph.D. is Professor Emeritus of Public Health in Environmental Health Sciences and Microbiology at Columbia University Medical Center.

  • Alan Dove, Ph.D. left laboratory research to become a science journalist, a job better suited to his short attention span and wide-ranging interests. His work appears in numerous publications, including the Webby-winning New York Academy of Sciences site, several of the Nature journals, and trade publications such as Drug Discovery and Development and Bioscience Technology. He blogs at Turbidplaque.

  • Rich Condit, Ph.D. is Professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology at the University of Florida and is on the editorial board for the Journal of Virology.

  • Kathy Spindler, Ph.D. is Professor of Microbiology and Immunology in the medical school at the University of Michigan.



  • The Microbiology of Cheese - Live June 10 at ASM Headquarters

    Have you ever wondered why mozzarella bubbling and stretching between pizza slices is so different from the earthy flavors of blue-veined gorgonzola? The diversity of cheeses we love are created by encouraging and manipulating the growth of specific microbes. The American Society for Microbiology is excited to explore and celebrate the roles microbes play in the production of a variety of cheeses - from milk-gathering to cheese aging.

    Tuesday, June 10th | 6-8pm
    ASM Headquarters | 1752 N St NW, Wash., D.C.
    Space is Limited | RSVP is Required

    We regret to inform you that we have reached our event capacity and are no longer accepting RSVPs. We will be taking sign-ups at the door for walk-ins. Check in will end at 6:40pm, just before the talks begin. Any unclaimed spots will be open for walk-ins on a first-come, first-served basis.

    Even if you are unable to attend the event in person, you can still watch the talks live below and pose direct questions to our speakers via chat or using Twitter: @microbeworld and/or #afterhours

    Please join us online!

    Watch Below

    Guest speakers include ...

    Dr. Rachel Dutton, Harvard University
    Rachel Dutton, Harvard UniversityAfter receiving her PhD in Microbiology from Harvard Medical School, Rachel Dutton was awarded a Bauer fellowship at Harvard University to start an independent research group. She combined her passions of microbiology and food into a research program that has the goal of using cheese as a way to understand microbial ecosystems. Cheese is home to a fascinating assortment of microbes; from bacteria, yeasts and molds, to microscopic mites. Work in the Dutton lab involves studying the microbial diversity of cheeses from around the world, and looking at how cheese microbes interact with each other to form communities. Rachel has been a speaker at events such as the World Science Festival, and regularly gives classes to the general public on the science of cheese and other fermented foods. Research from the Dutton lab has been featured in Lucky Peach Magazine, The Mind of a Chef TV series on PBS, EdibleBoston, the Boston Globe, NPR, and the New York Times. 



    Mateo Kehler, Jasper Hill Farms
    Mateo Kehler, Jasper Hill FarmsMateo Kehler started Jasper Hill Farm with his brother Andy in 2003 where they produce a wide range of cheeses from the milk of their herd of 45 Ayrshire cows. In 2008 they started a new venture, the Cellars at Jasper Hill, a 22,000 square foot underground cheese ripening facility, to lower the barriers to entry for new cheesemakers by maturing, marketing and selling cheeses, managing logistics and administration and providing technical support to local producers. The Cellars at Jasper Hill is committed to developing economic mechanisms to keep the working landscape in Vermont's Northeast Kingdom working, and delivering deliciousness is a core and principle component in this effort. Mateo lives on the farm in Greensboro, VT with his wife Angie and children Reed and Zola.



    Resources


    Even if you are unable to attend the event in person, you can still watch the talks live in the video player above. The video will be archived shortly thereafter on MicrobeWorld's YouTube channel and website for future viewing.

    The Microbiology of Beer - The “Microbes After Hours” series, 6-8 pm, Thursday, October 10, 2013

    The master ingredient in beer is yeast – a microbe – and every step in the brewing process helps the yeast do its job better. Join us at the American Society of Microbiology to learn more about how microbes are selected, grown, and manipulated in modern breweries to develop a wide variety of flavors and textures!

    MAH-Beer-Flyer

    Guest speakers include ...


    Thursday, October 10th | 6-8 pm
    ASM Headquarters | 1752 N St NW 

    Resources

    The Microbiology of Beer Poster (.pdf)

    FAQ: If the Yeast Ain't Happy, Ain't Nobody Happy: The Microbiology of Beer, February 2013 (.pdf)


    IMPORTANT NOTICE: We regret to inform you that we have reached our event capacity and are no longer accepting RSVPs. We will be taking sign-ups at the door for walk-ins. Check in will end at 6:40pm, just before the talks begin. Any unclaimed spots will be open for walk-ins on a first-come, first-served basis.

    Even if you are unable to attend the event in person, you can still watch the talks live in the video player above. The video will be archived shortly thereafter on MicrobeWorld's YouTube channel and website for future viewing.

    Shutting Down the Government - The “Microbes After Hours” series, 6-8 pm, Monday, July 8th

    How can something too small to be seen with the naked eye be powerful enough to bring down something like the U.S. Government? It turns out that microbes, mostly invisible, have the extraordinary capacity to affect our lives – through outbreaks of disease and the spread of fear. Twice in history, microbes have even brought the U.S. Government to a halt!

    Join us at the D.C. headquarters of the American Society for Microbiology to learn more about the Yellow Fever outbreak of 1792 that caused the fledgling Congress to flee and the Anthrax scare of 2001 that also shut down government buildings and agencies. Come mingle with us over FREE local brews and appetizers, and hear about these fascinating episodes where microbiology meets U.S. history.

    Guest speakers include ...

    Dr. Marshall Bloom, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease
    Dr. Douglas Beecher, Federal Bureau of Investigation

    Monday, July 8th | 6-7:30 pm
    ASM Headquarters | 1752 N St NW
    Space is Limited | RSVP is Required


    If you are not able to make it to ASM's headquarters in person we will be live streaming the event below. The video will be archived shortly thereafter on MicrobeWorld's YouTube channel and website for future viewing.

    The Microbiology of the Bioeconomy - An ASM "Microbes After Hours" Event - Monday,June 3, 2013, 6-8 p.m. ET

    Microbiology is poised to make significant inroads towards reducing dependence on crude oil and petroleum-based products.

    (To ask a question please post it in the chat or tweet @microbeworld. ASM Live is now mobile friendly.)

    Join us at ASM headquarters to learn how we can harness the immense metabolic diversity of microbes to generate biofuels and other commodity chemicals from digestion and fermentation of renewable biomass resources. After enjoying FREE local brews and appetizers, come discover the potential of the microbial bioeconomy from the director of NIFA and a microbial metabolic engineer.

    Guest speakers include ...

    Monday, June 3rd | 6-8pm (Live stream starts at 6:45 p.m., ET)
    ASM Headquarters | 1752 N St NW, D.C.
    Space is Limited | RSVP is Required

    If you are not able to make it to ASM's headquarters in person we will be live streaming the event below. The video will be archived shortly thereafter on MicrobeWorld's YouTube channel and website for future viewing.

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