ASM's Microbes After Hours

In May 2012, the American Society for Microbiology launched a new Happy Hour series called “Microbes After Hours” which gathers together scientists and curious citizens at ASM headquarters in Washington DC for relaxed evenings of appetizers, local brews and exciting microbiology talks by renowned experts.  Since the inaugural session, the series has tackled topics such as “Microbes and Microbrews: the Microbiology of Brewing Beer,” “The Human Microbiome: My Microbes, Myself,” and “The Return of Influenza.”  The series has grown beyond its local roots to bring together scientists and enthusiastic learners from all over the globe through live broadcasts on MicrobeWorld.

The Microbiology of Cheese - Live June 10 at ASM Headquarters

Have you ever wondered why mozzarella bubbling and stretching between pizza slices is so different from the earthy flavors of blue-veined gorgonzola? The diversity of cheeses we love are created by encouraging and manipulating the growth of specific microbes. The American Society for Microbiology is excited to explore and celebrate the roles microbes play in the production of a variety of cheeses - from milk-gathering to cheese aging.

Tuesday, June 10th | 6-8pm
ASM Headquarters | 1752 N St NW, Wash., D.C.
Space is Limited | RSVP is Required

We regret to inform you that we have reached our event capacity and are no longer accepting RSVPs. We will be taking sign-ups at the door for walk-ins. Check in will end at 6:40pm, just before the talks begin. Any unclaimed spots will be open for walk-ins on a first-come, first-served basis.

Even if you are unable to attend the event in person, you can still watch the talks live below and pose direct questions to our speakers via chat or using Twitter: @microbeworld and/or #afterhours

Please join us online!

Watch Below

Guest speakers include ...

Dr. Rachel Dutton, Harvard University
Rachel Dutton, Harvard UniversityAfter receiving her PhD in Microbiology from Harvard Medical School, Rachel Dutton was awarded a Bauer fellowship at Harvard University to start an independent research group. She combined her passions of microbiology and food into a research program that has the goal of using cheese as a way to understand microbial ecosystems. Cheese is home to a fascinating assortment of microbes; from bacteria, yeasts and molds, to microscopic mites. Work in the Dutton lab involves studying the microbial diversity of cheeses from around the world, and looking at how cheese microbes interact with each other to form communities. Rachel has been a speaker at events such as the World Science Festival, and regularly gives classes to the general public on the science of cheese and other fermented foods. Research from the Dutton lab has been featured in Lucky Peach Magazine, The Mind of a Chef TV series on PBS, EdibleBoston, the Boston Globe, NPR, and the New York Times. 



Mateo Kehler, Jasper Hill Farms
Mateo Kehler, Jasper Hill FarmsMateo Kehler started Jasper Hill Farm with his brother Andy in 2003 where they produce a wide range of cheeses from the milk of their herd of 45 Ayrshire cows. In 2008 they started a new venture, the Cellars at Jasper Hill, a 22,000 square foot underground cheese ripening facility, to lower the barriers to entry for new cheesemakers by maturing, marketing and selling cheeses, managing logistics and administration and providing technical support to local producers. The Cellars at Jasper Hill is committed to developing economic mechanisms to keep the working landscape in Vermont's Northeast Kingdom working, and delivering deliciousness is a core and principle component in this effort. Mateo lives on the farm in Greensboro, VT with his wife Angie and children Reed and Zola.



Resources


Even if you are unable to attend the event in person, you can still watch the talks live in the video player above. The video will be archived shortly thereafter on MicrobeWorld's YouTube channel and website for future viewing.

The Microbiology of Beer - The “Microbes After Hours” series, 6-8 pm, Thursday, October 10, 2013

The master ingredient in beer is yeast – a microbe – and every step in the brewing process helps the yeast do its job better. Join us at the American Society of Microbiology to learn more about how microbes are selected, grown, and manipulated in modern breweries to develop a wide variety of flavors and textures!

MAH-Beer-Flyer

Guest speakers include ...


Thursday, October 10th | 6-8 pm
ASM Headquarters | 1752 N St NW 

Resources

The Microbiology of Beer Poster (.pdf)

FAQ: If the Yeast Ain't Happy, Ain't Nobody Happy: The Microbiology of Beer, February 2013 (.pdf)


IMPORTANT NOTICE: We regret to inform you that we have reached our event capacity and are no longer accepting RSVPs. We will be taking sign-ups at the door for walk-ins. Check in will end at 6:40pm, just before the talks begin. Any unclaimed spots will be open for walk-ins on a first-come, first-served basis.

Even if you are unable to attend the event in person, you can still watch the talks live in the video player above. The video will be archived shortly thereafter on MicrobeWorld's YouTube channel and website for future viewing.

Shutting Down the Government - The “Microbes After Hours” series, 6-8 pm, Monday, July 8th

How can something too small to be seen with the naked eye be powerful enough to bring down something like the U.S. Government? It turns out that microbes, mostly invisible, have the extraordinary capacity to affect our lives – through outbreaks of disease and the spread of fear. Twice in history, microbes have even brought the U.S. Government to a halt!

Join us at the D.C. headquarters of the American Society for Microbiology to learn more about the Yellow Fever outbreak of 1792 that caused the fledgling Congress to flee and the Anthrax scare of 2001 that also shut down government buildings and agencies. Come mingle with us over FREE local brews and appetizers, and hear about these fascinating episodes where microbiology meets U.S. history.

Guest speakers include ...

Dr. Marshall Bloom, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease
Dr. Douglas Beecher, Federal Bureau of Investigation

Monday, July 8th | 6-7:30 pm
ASM Headquarters | 1752 N St NW
Space is Limited | RSVP is Required


If you are not able to make it to ASM's headquarters in person we will be live streaming the event below. The video will be archived shortly thereafter on MicrobeWorld's YouTube channel and website for future viewing.

The Microbiology of the Bioeconomy - An ASM "Microbes After Hours" Event - Monday,June 3, 2013, 6-8 p.m. ET

Microbiology is poised to make significant inroads towards reducing dependence on crude oil and petroleum-based products.

(To ask a question please post it in the chat or tweet @microbeworld. ASM Live is now mobile friendly.)

Join us at ASM headquarters to learn how we can harness the immense metabolic diversity of microbes to generate biofuels and other commodity chemicals from digestion and fermentation of renewable biomass resources. After enjoying FREE local brews and appetizers, come discover the potential of the microbial bioeconomy from the director of NIFA and a microbial metabolic engineer.

Guest speakers include ...

Monday, June 3rd | 6-8pm (Live stream starts at 6:45 p.m., ET)
ASM Headquarters | 1752 N St NW, D.C.
Space is Limited | RSVP is Required

If you are not able to make it to ASM's headquarters in person we will be live streaming the event below. The video will be archived shortly thereafter on MicrobeWorld's YouTube channel and website for future viewing.

West Nile Virus - An ASM "Microbes After Hours" Event - 5/6/2013

2012 saw a surge of West Nile Virus infections, particularly in the central United States. What exactly is West Nile Virus and why do outbreaks occur?

Join us at ASM headquarters to learn more about the biology of this fascinating virus - how it moves between hosts, how the disease is diagnosed and treated, and how outbreaks can potentially be prevented. Come mingle with us over FREE local brews and appetizers, all the while discovering how West Nile Virus works!

Monday, May 6th | 6-8pm
ASM Headquarters | 1752 N St NW, D.C.
Space is Limited | RSVP is Required

If you are not able to make it to ASM's headquarters in person we will be live streaming the event below. The video will be archived shortly thereafter on MicrobeWorld's YouTube channel and website for future viewing.

West Nile Virus - An ASM "Microbes After Hours" Event - 5/6/2013 from microbeworld on Vimeo.

(To ask a question please post it in the chat or tweet @microbeworld. ASM Live is now mobile friendly.)


 

West Nile Virus

West Nile Poster - Click to download PDF

West Nile virus was first detected in North America until 1999 when an outbreak occurred in New York City. In the next five years, West Nile virus swept across the continent, reaching the Pacific shore in 2004. Like other Flaviviruses, West Nile is an "arthropod-borne virus" or "arbovirus". Its transmission and the completion of its life cycle critically depends on the feeding activities of mosquitos, who transmit the virus as they feed on the blood of infected animals Despite the incidence of infection among humans, however, Homo sapiens are actually dead-end hosts for the West Nile virus. Indeed, birds are the primary amplifying hosts and their migratory patterns are thought to have promoted the rapid spread of the virus to new habitats. To learn more about West Nile virus in preparation for the upcoming "Microbes After Hours" event, download the Microbes After Hours West Nile Virus PDF on the left.

 

Guest speakers include:

petersenDr. Lyle Petersen
Lyle R. Petersen, M.D., M.P.H., has served as the director of the Division of Vector-Borne Diseases since 2004. Dr. Petersen began his training at the University of California, San Diego where he received an undergraduate degree in biology. He then studied medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. After medical school, Dr. Petersen completed an internship and residency in internal medicine at Stanford University, CDC’s Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) applied epidemiology training program, CDC’s Preventive Medicine Residency Program, and a masters of public health program at Emory University. He served in several positions at CDC before joining the Division of Vector-borne Diseases, first as Deputy Director for Science and then Director. He is the author of more than 175 scientific publications and has received a number of scientific awards. His current research focuses on the epidemiology of arboviral and bacterial vector-borne zoonoses.


debiasi headshotDr. Roberta DeBiasi
Roberta Lynn DeBiasi, MD, FIDSA, is Associate Professor of Pediatrics at George Washington University School of Medicine, Acting Chief and Attending Physician in the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Children's National Medical Center, and investigator at Children's Research Institute in the Center for Translational Science in Washington, D.C. A fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and a member of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), she is also a past recipient of IDSA's Young Investigator Award.

Dr. DeBiasi's research expertise includes basic science as well as clinical/translational research in several areas. She is currently the Principal Investigator for several clinical research projects and trials, focusing on improved treatments for viral encephalitis, influenza, neonatal herpes simplex virus, congenital cytomegalovirus, and adenovirus in normal and immunocompromised children. An active investigator in the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) Collaborative Antiviral Study Group, through the National Institutes of Health (NIH), she also performs research on community acquired pneumonia and hospital acquired infections with multiple drug resistant organisms. Her basic research focused on mechanisms of viral pathogenesis and the development of new treatments for viral myocarditis. She is the author of original research, review articles, and book chapters focusing on severe viral infections, including viral myocarditis, encephalitis, meningitis, West Nile Virus, and adenovirus in patients with compromised immune systems.

Dr. DeBiasi also treats immunocompetent and immunocompromised children hospitalized with severe infections at Children's National Medical Center in Washington, D.C. She served as the former fellowship training program director in the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, and greatly enjoys teaching and mentoring graduate and medical students, residents, and fellows in the classroom as well as on the hospital wards.

 

The Secret Language of Bacteria - An ASM "Microbes After Hours" Event

No bacterium lives alone – it is constantly encountering members of its own species as well as other kinds of bacteria and diverse organisms like viruses, fungi, plants and animals. To navigate a complex world, microbes use chemical signals to sense and communicate with one another.

Join us on Monday, January 28th, 2013, from 6-7:30 p.m. at ASM's headquarters, 1752 N St., NW, Washington, D.C., for free local brews, appetizers, and a glimpse into the fascinating language of bacteria with discussions by Bonnie Bassler, Princeton University, and Steven Lindow, University of California, Berkley.

RSVP is required as space is limited.

If you are not able to make it to ASM's headquarters in person we will be live streaming the event below. The video will be archived shortly thereafter on MicrobeWorld's YouTube channel and website for future viewing.


Dr. Bonnie Bassler, Princeton University

Bonnie Bassler Ph.D. is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and the Squibb Professor of Molecular Biology at Princeton University.  The research in her laboratory focuses on the molecular mechanisms that bacteria use for intercellular communication.  This process is called quorum sensing.  Bassler’s research is paving the way to the development of novel therapies for combating bacteria by disrupting quorum-sensing-mediated communication.  Dr. Bassler was awarded a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship in 2002.  She was elected to the American Academy of Microbiology in 2002 and made a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2004.  Dr. Bassler was the President of the American Society for Microbiology in 2010-2011; she is currently the Chair of the American Academy of Microbiology Board of Governors. She is also a member of the National Science Board and was nominated to that position by President Barak Obama. The Board oversees the NSF and prioritizes the nation’s research and educational priorities in science, math and engineering.

Dr. Steven Lindow, University of California, Berkeley

Steven Lindow Ph.D. is a Professor at the University of California, Berkley where his research focuses on various aspects of the interaction of bacteria with the surface and interior of plants.  Dr. Lindow’ s lab uses a variety of molecular and microscopy-based methods to study the ecology of bacterial epiphytes that live on the surface of plants as well as certain bacteria that are vascular pathogens of plants.  They also study bacteria that live in and on plants that are fostered by consumption of the alkaloids produced by endophytic fungi. The longer-term goal of their research is to improve plants’ productivity by achieving control of plant diseases through altering the microbial communities in and on plants.  Dr. Lindow is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and was elected to fellowship in both the American Academy of Microbiology and the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1999.

Details

Monday, January 28, 2013 | 6-7:30 PM
ASM Headquarters | 1752 N Street NW 
Cost: FREE
Space is limited/RSVP is required 
Must be 21+ w/ valid ID

Return of Influenza - A “Microbes After Hours” Series - Tuesday, October 9, 2012

Fall is on the horizon, bringing with it freshly-sharpened pencils, vibrantly-colored leaves, and of course - the annual influenza season. Join us at ASM Headquarters on Tuesday, October 9, 2012, from 6 - 8 PM ET (RSVP online), to learn about the microbiology of this fascinating virus and why vaccination not only protects ourselves but higher-risk individuals all around us. Come mingle with like-minded enthusiasts and curious citizens over FREE local brews and appetizers – all while discovering how the influenza virus works and what its diversity means for you! 

For those of you who do not live in the Washington, D.C. area we will also be live streaming the event. You can watch below.

 

Recorded on October 9, 2012 at the American Society for Microbiology in Washington, D.C.

afterhours100912Guest speakers include…

Dr. Jeff Taubenberger, NIH/NIAID

Jeffery K. Taubenberger, M.D., Ph.D., is Chief of the Viral Pathogenesis and Evolution Section in the Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Prior to coming to NIAID in 2006, he served as Chair of the Department of Molecular Pathology at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology. Dr. Taubenberger received a B.S. in Biology from George Mason University in 1982, and his medical degree in 1986 and Ph.D. in 1987 from the Medical College of Virginia, where he was elected into the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society. He did his residency in pathology at the National Cancer Institute and he holds dual board certifications in Anatomic Pathology and in Molecular Genetic Pathology. He was elected into the Association of American Physicians and into the American Academy of Microbiology. He has published over 175 papers in such journals as Science, Nature, and the New England Journal of Medicine. Dr. Taubenberger’s research interests include influenza virus biology, pathophysiology, and clinical research. Among his key contributions to the field was the characterization of the virus responsible for the 1918 influenza pandemic, which killed approximately 50 million people worldwide.

Dr. Kristin Nichol, University of Minnesota

Dr. Nichol is Associate Chief of Staff for Research at the Minneapolis VA Health Care System and Professor of Medicine at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Nichol’s research has focused on issues relating to adults vaccines with a special emphasis on influenza and pneumococcal vaccination. She has pursued observational studies and clinical trials in such areas as successful delivery strategies, determinants of vaccination behavior, side effects associated with vaccination, and the clinical efficacy and cost effectiveness of vaccination. Dr. Nichol has authored more than 100 publications in these areas and has given presentations at numerous national and international meetings. Dr. Nichol is Chairperson of the Minnesota Coalition for Adult Immunization – a position she has held for 20 years. This group provides leadership for enhancing adult vaccination for the entire state of Minnesota. She also served for 15 years as the Department of Veterans Affairs ex officio member of the US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). Dr. Nichol received her MD and MPH degrees from the University of Minnesota and her MBA from the University of St. Thomas. She pursued her internal medicine training at the University of California in San Francisco and the University of Minnesota. Dr. Nichol is boarded in Internal Medicine and Preventive Medicine.

Details

Tuesday, October 9, 2012 | 6-8PM
ASM Headquarters | 1752 N Street NW
Cost: FREE
Space is limited/RSVP is required
Must be 21+ w/ valid ID

My Microbes, Myself (Video)

Did you know that your body is home to 10 times more microbes than human cells? Learn about the human microbiome and its fascinating practical applications. Speakers include Dr. Lita Proctor, Human Microbiome Project at NIH, Dr. Liliana Losada, J Craig Venter Institute, Rockville, MD, Dr. Jacques Ravel, University of Maryland School of Medicine, and Dr. Vincent Young, University of Michigan Medical School. Filmed live at the American Society for Microbiology in Washington, D.C., on July 19, 2012.

My Microbes, Myself from microbeworld on Vimeo.

American Society for Microbiology
2012 1752 N Street, N.W. • Washington, DC 20036-2904 • (202) 737-3600
American Society For Microbiology © 2014   |   Privacy Policy   |   Terms of Use