MTS44 Michael Worobey - In Search of the Origin of HIV and H1N1's Hidden History

In this episode, I talk to Michael Worobey, an associate professor at the University of Arizona.

Worobey is virus detective, gathering clues about how some of the world's deadliest pathogens have emerged and spread across the globe. Worobey and I talked about the harrowing journeys he has made in search of the origin of HIV, as well as the round-the-clock data-processing he and his colleagues used to discover the hidden history of the new H1N1 flu strain.

Download: mp3 (42.5 min | 19.5 megs)
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Photos taken in January 2000 in the forest about 60km south of Kisangani DRC during an expedition to collect samples from wild chimpanzee.

 

Comments (2)

  1. Dr. Worobey mentioned routine male neonatal circumcision "overall reduces the transmission of the virus quite a lot." I think his information was mixed with promoting safer sex practices; like condom use which squash ANY insignificant benefit that routinely mutilating either sex before an age of conscious consent would bring. If not having a foreskin had ANY benefit to mammals of ANY kind we would see more then two species of mammals without them.
  2. I completely agree with Troy's rational arguments against genital mutilation in infants.

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