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Bacteria May Predict Chances of Colon Cancer

Researchers report that germs living in your gut could affect your risk of developing colon cancer.

The findings suggest that signs of the existence of some germs "are more frequently detected in subjects with polyps, early lesions that can develop into cancer, while other bacterial signature... Read More

Do Hand Sanitizer and Liquid Hand Soap Remove Viruses?

While reading my back issues of Applied and Environmental Microbiology (AEM), I came across an interesting paper that detailed an in-depth study on the effectiveness of hand cleaners to remove Norwalk virus (NV) from intentionally contaminated hands.

Yes that’s right – intentionally contamina... Read More

Vertex hep C drug achieves 75 pct cure rate: study

A closely watched experimental hepatitis C treatment being developed by Vertex Pharmaceuticals Inc led to a 75 percent cure rate in a pivotal late-stage trial of previously untreated patients, the company said on Tuesday.

The results from the first Phase III study of telaprevir were roughly i... Read More

Futures in Biotech 60: Do you come to this cave often?

I joined Marc Pelletier on episode 60 of Futures in Biotech for a conversation with Dave Brodbeck, George Farr, and Andre Nantel. We talked about primate face recognition, discovery of a new antiviral compound to treat hepatitis C virus infection, changing the length of a codon from three to fou... Read More

Delaying childhood vaccinations does not improve children's health, study finds

Now that the thimerosal-autism link has been thoroughly discredited, some autism advocates argue that neurodevelopmental problems are caused by overloading children's immune systems with too many vaccines too early in life. As a result, a growing number of parents are asking pediatricians to use... Read More

"By golly, Jim... I'm beginning to think I can cure a rainy day!" - McCoy

While Bones might be overestimating his skills there a mite bit, I think the simple "old country Doc" would see the potential for this therapy to move us more towards the sort of medicine he's accustomed to practicing. However, if he does work that rainy day cure out, I have need of him in subu... Read More

Outbreak of Dengue Fever Is Reported in Florida, Health Officials Say

Dengue fever, a growing scourge in the tropics, has established itself in a popular American tourist destination, federal health officials reported last week.

Last August, an alert doctor in upstate New York realized that one of his patients, whose only recent travel had been to Key West, Fl... Read More

New Threats to U.S. Blood Supply

Public health officials are battling a host of new infectious threats to the nation's blood supply.

Blood centers, which have long tested for risks like hepatitis C and AIDS, have added a number of new tests on donated blood in recent years, including checks for West Nile virus and Chagas, a... Read More

Soil Bacteria Might Increase Learning

Studies have shown time spent in nature does us all good. Specifically a recent study done with 1,200 people, published in the journal Environmental Health and Technology found that even just five minutes in a leafy park can significantly boost our mood. Well it might be because we inhaled some ... Read More

From Trees and Grass, Bacteria That Cause Snow and Rain

Walking across the campus of Montana State University here, David Sands, a plant pathologist, says the blanket of snow draped over the mountains around town contains a surprise.

The cause of most of it, he said, is a living organism, a bacterium, called pseudomonas syringae.

In the last ... Read More

Viral Infection Could Be Marker for Type 1 Diabetes

Researchers have discovered a link between infection with enteroviruses -- which can cause viral meningitis -- and diagnoses of type 1 diabetes in children.

It's not clear how the two might be linked, but the findings suggest that the existence of the virus could be a biomarker for diabetes i... Read More

FDA approves swine flu test for permanent use

The Food and Drug Administration says it has approved the first diagnostic test for 2009 swine flu under its traditional approval system.

The FDA previously cleared several tests on a limited basis for use during the declared public health emergency related to swine flu.

The new Simplexa I... Read More

Microbicides That Do More Than Gel: Vaginal Rings, Tablets and Films

A flexible ring containing two anti-HIV drugs showed in laboratory tests that it can deliver therapeutic levels of both drugs for up to 30 days, researchers reported at the International Microbicides Conference (M2010) in Pittsburgh, adding that they consider the ring near ready for testing of i... Read More

Antibacterial Silver Nanoparticles Are a Blast

Writing in the International Journal of Nanoparticles, Rani Pattabi and colleagues at Mangalore University, explain how blasting silver nitrate solution with an electron beam can generate nanoparticles that are more effective at killing all kinds of bacteria, including gram-negative species that... Read More

Pentagon to Troop-Killing Superbugs: Resistance is Futile


A super-germ that’s become a lethal threat to troops in Iraq and Afghanistan may have met its match in a novel technique that kills entire bacterial colonies within hours.

Today’s troops have a 9 in 10 chance of surviving their battle injuries. But wounds and amputation sites leave them vul... Read More

Science Is Sexy: What’s The Big Deal About Synthetic Life?

If you follow the science (and probably Sci-Fi) news at all, you’ve probably heard about Craig Venter’s successful creation of the first synthetic organism. Just so we’re all on the same page, the new organism is much like any other bacterium, except it has a custom-made genome with not only ge... Read More

Experimental Ebola Vaccine Also Works On New Virus

No virus is more feared than Ebola. So scientists were alarmed when a new species of Ebola emerged in Uganda in 2007.

They worried that the Bundibugyo ebolavirus, as it's called after the township in western Uganda where it was discovered, wouldn't be thwarted by the promising experimental v... Read More

Snake Oil in Your Snacks

ProBugs, a yogurtlike beverage for kids, is tasty, fun and good for your child's digestive system, if claims from its maker, Lifeway Foods, near Chicago, are to be believed. Sold at high-end stores like Whole Foods, it comes in flavors like Sublime Slime Lime and contains a hefty dose of 7 billi... Read More

Disease May Derail Space Travel

Researchers at Nancy University in Lorraine, France have raised concerns that disease will make it impossible to support long-term space travel such as manned missions to Mars. Space travel both weakens the immune system and promotes more virulent growth of bacteria, a potentially deadly combina... Read More

Study Uncovers Optimal Ecology of Bioinsecticide

BBSRC-funded researchers at the University of Oxford and Royal Holloway University of London have discovered that the commonly used and naturally occurring bacterial insecticide Bt works best if applied to young plants and is enhanced by the presence of the insect pests.

The research is publi... Read More

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