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BacterioFiles Episode 14

In this show, I report on four exciting stories: microbial electrosynthesis, desert dust that affects ocean microbes, bacteria dividing unequally, and bacteria that can make you smarter.




























(13.2 MB, 14.5 minut... Read More

TWiV 86 letters

Stann writes:


I found your podcast through the Microbe World website. Thanks to Microbe World, I've been unable to sate my thirst for knowledge about the microscopic organisms that act as the foundation for our planet. So, I stumble across a podcast about viruses? Hel... Read More

TWiV 86: Dark matter with Dr. Eric Delwart

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On episode #86 of the podcast This Week in Virology, Vincent and Rich travel to the Blood Systems Research Institute in San Francisco to speak wi... Read More

Fungus Among Us Could Become Non-Food Source for Biodiesel Production

In the quest for alternatives to soybeans, palm, and other edible oilseed plants as sources for biodiesel production, enter an unlikely new candidate: A fungus, or mold, that produces and socks away large amounts of oils that are suitable for low-cost, eco-friendly biodiesel.

That's the topic... Read More

World Health Organization Scientists Linked to Swine Flu Vaccine Makers

Scientists who advised the World Health Organization on its influenza policies and recommendations—including the decision to proclaim the so-called swine flu a "pandemic" had close ties to companies that manufacture vaccines and antiviral medicines like Tamiflu, a fact that WHO did not publicly ... Read More

Treatment with Naturally Occuring Protein Prevents and Reverses Brain Damage Caused by Meningitis

A team of researchers at Childrens Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA), along with colleagues from the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California and the Universite Auvergne, France, have discovered an important role for a small, naturally occurring protein called interleukin-10 (I... Read More

Rotavirus Vaccine Contraindicated in Infants With Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

Rotavirus vaccine should not be administered to infants with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved prescribing information and patient safety labeling.

Both monovalent (RV1)... Read More

Mutant Gene Link to West Nile Virus in Horses

The same mutated gene that makes humans more susceptible to the potentially fatal West Nile virus is also responsible for the virus affecting horses, according to scientists at the University of Adelaide, Australia.

A naturally occurring mutation of the OAS1 gene has now been confirmed as inc... Read More

What's Eating You? 8 Terrible Parasites (Video)

A year and a half after traveling abroad, one might think he's free and clear of infection.

But a 25-year-old man in California headed to the emergency room last year with a burning feeling and something squiggling under the white of his eye.

Doctors at the Highland General Hospital Depa... Read More

How Bacteria Boost the Immune System

Scientists have long known that certain types of bacteria boost the immune system. Now, Loyola University Health System researchers have discovered how bacteria perform this essential task.

Senior author Katherine L. Knight, PhD. and colleagues report their discovery in a featured article in ... Read More

New Strain of Bacteria Discovered That Could Aid in Oil Spill, Other Environmental Cleanup

Researchers have discovered a new strain of bacteria that can produce non-toxic, comparatively inexpensive "rhamnolipids," and effectively help degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs -- environmental pollutants that are one of the most harmful aspects of oil spills.

Because of its ... Read More

Virus infection may trigger unusual immune cells to attack the brain and spinal cord in multiple sclerosis

A virus infection can incite the body to attack its own nerve tissue by activating rare, disease-fighting cells with receptors for both viral and nerve proteins. The dual-receptor observation suggests a way nerve damage might be triggered in susceptible young adults afflicted with multiple scler... Read More

Bacteria Converted Into ‘mini-Factories’ For Biofuels and Vaccines

Scientists at the University of Kent and University College Cork have manipulated simple bacteria into constructing internal compartments where biofuels and vaccines can be produced.

These micro-compartments eventually occupy almost 70 percent of the available space in a bacteria cell, enabli... Read More

Insight into structure of HIV protein could aid drug design

A University of Iowa and University of Nebraska study has revealed the structure of an important HIV protein attached to the human protein that the virus hijacks during infection. The structural information might help researchers develop drugs that disrupt HIV replication. Image shows structure ... Read More

Why Patients Aren’t Getting the Shingles Vaccine

Four years ago at age 78, R., a retired professional known as much for her small-town Minnesotan resilience as her commitment to public service, developed a fleeting rash over her left chest. The rash, which turned out to be shingles, or herpes zoster, was hardly noticeable.

But the complica... Read More

Regulators urged to help develop antibiotics

U.S. regulators need to provide a clear path for drug companies to develop new antibiotics and should consider offering financial incentives, experts told a Congressional panel on Wednesday.

They said doctors are running out of effective antibiotics, yet inconsistent regulatory guidelines at ... Read More

Unraveling how bacteria motor along

Analysis of the protein structure of the 'motor' of motile bacteria at high resolution by Saori Maki-Yonekura and Koji Yonekura of the RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima, and Keiichi Namba of Osaka University has revealed the mechanism for transitioning between different movements.

The flagellum h... Read More

A new target for hepatitis C virus

When infection with hepatitis C virus goes from acute to chronic, severe liver disease may occur which requires organ transplantation. Nearly 200 million people are chronically infected with HCV, necessitating approaches to preventing and treating infections. No HCV vaccine is available, and cur... Read More

New strain behind meningitis cases in France

Medical scientists in France have seen a recent rise in cases of meningitis C caused by a virulent substrain of bacteria whose emergence in other European countries led health authorities to introduce routine vaccination against the disease. Reporting this month online in The Journal of Infectio... Read More

WVU Tech Selenium Process May Help Coal Industry

The selenium clock is ticking for mountaintop mining companies, as the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection prepares to crack down with water quality standards that producers have argued in the past are too expensive to meet.

But scientists at the West Virginia University Inst... Read More

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