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Apply Now! ASM Communications and Marketing Fellowship for 2015

 


Are you an early career scientist who is interested in public outreach? Do you want to share your love of microbiology with the world?  Consider applying to the American Society for Microbiology’s Headquarter Communications Fellowship.  This 6-month fellowship in Wash... Read More

Guinea Worm Said to Infect Few in 2013

Only 148 cases of Guinea worm disease were found in the world in 2013, a 73 percent drop from the 542 cases found one year earlier, the Carter Center announced Thursday.

Along with polio, Guinea worm is one of two diseases hovering on the brink of extinction, with fewer than 1,000 cases annua... Read More

ICAAC 2014 - Emerging Answers on the Ebola Outbreak

Recognizing the importance of the public health emergency of the Ebola outbreak in western Africa, the organizers of the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial ... Read More

TWiV 285: Hokies go viral

Vincent meets up with XJ Meng and Sarah McDonald at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg to talk about their work on viruses of swine and rotaviruses.


Host: Vincent Racaniello


Guests: Read More

Celebrity portraits grown out stars' own bacteria

Well-known faces including Stephen Fry and Carol Vorderman are helping make art out of science by taking part in an experiment to grow portraits using their own bacteria.

The celebrities teamed up with American microbiologist and photographer Zachary Copfer to make the images by contributing ... Read More

The Microbes Living in Our Bodies Were Probably Once Evil Pathogens

Like pretty much all multi-cellular organisms, humans enjoy the benefits of helpful bacteria. (As you may have heard, there are more bacteria in the human body than cells.) These mutualistic microbes live within the body of a larger organism, and, like any good long-term houseguest, help out the... Read More

TWiV 305: Rhymes with shinola

Vincent, Alan, and Kathy continue their coverage of the Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa, with a discussion of case fatality ratio, reproductive index, a conspiracy theory, and spread of the virus to the United States.


Hosts:  Read More

TWiV 297: Ebola! Don't panic

The TWiVites present an all-ebolavirus episode, tackling virology, epidemiology, and approaches to prevention and cure that are in the pipeline.


Hosts: Vincent Racaniello Read More

TWiP 67 letters


CN writes:


Greetings Profs,


After having listened to your discussions on Plasmodium (TWiP 64), I explored papers on treatment options that are actually available. After having read some papers, I realized that one of the main roadblocks are the hypnozoite... Read More

BacterioFiles 172 - Sunlight-Snackers Seize Sparks

This episode: Some photosynthetic bacteria can use electricity for their metabolism to make useful stuff too!


(9.2 MB, 10 minutes)


Show notes: 
News item 1... Read More

Rare bacteria outbreak linked to Chicago hospital

CHICAGO, Jan. 6 (UPI) -- The largest outbreak ever of a rare but potentially deadly bacteria has been tied to equipment in a Chicago-area hospital, health officials said.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said 44 cases of infection by the bacteria carbapenem-resistant enterobacteri... Read More

TWiV 267: Snow in the headlights

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Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Alan Dove, Read More

TWiV 276: Ramblers go viral

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 Host: Vincent Racaniello


Guests: Read More

The Science of Cheese Is Weirder Than You Think

The science behind the transformation from plants to milk to cheese is amazing. In fact, cheese has much in common with wine and beer: They result from fermentation by microorganisms; they are “value-added” products where processing greatly increases the value; and they reflect local climate and... Read More

TWiV 308: The Running Mad Professor

Tom talks with Vincent about viral central nervous system infections of global importance, Ebola virus, and running the fastest marathon dressed as a doctor.


Host: Vincent Racaniello Read More

Death toll from H1N1 rises as strain returns, with ‘young invincibles’ most affected

The H1N1 virus responsible for the 2009 global pandemic is back. State health officials from across the country say the resurgence is resulting in a dramatic rise in flu deaths in young and middle-aged adults and in children this season.

While the reported death tolls so far are only a fracti... Read More

TWiM #87: Avogadro, archaeal fossils, and ICAAC

Hosts: Vincent RacanielloMichael Schmidt, ... Read More

BacterioFiles 166 - Metamorphosis Microbes Mapped

This episode: Discovering how butterflies' bacteria change from caterpillar to adult!


(7.5 MB, 8.1 minutes)


Show notes: 
News item/ Read More

TWiP 77: Mixed messages

Vincent and Dickson discuss the exchange of messenger RNAs between a parasitic plant and its hosts.


Hosts: Vincent Racaniello and Dickson Despommier Read More

Ten years of virology blog

Ten years ago this month I wrote the first post at virology blog, entitled Are viruses living? Thanks to EE Giorgi for pointing out the ten year anniversary, and also for publishing an interview with me at her blog, Chimeras. Here is how this blog got started. Read More

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