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Germ-hunting antibodies suppress HIV-like virus in monkeys; may hold key to new treatment

Doctors may one day be able to control a patient’s HIV infection in a new way: injecting swarms of germ-fighting antibodies, two new studies suggest. In monkeys, that strategy sharply reduced blood levels of a cousin of HIV. The results also gave tantalizing hints that someday the tactic might h... Read More

Arthronema Gygaxiana: The Bacterial Dungeon Master

Dungeons & Dragons co-creator Gary Gygax touched the lives of the people who loved his games. So when the legendary Dungeon Master died in March 2008, players around the world showed their thanks with heartfelt tributes –including naming a species of bacteria after him.

Arthronema gygaxiana i... Read More

John Holland, 83

Virologist John Holland passed away on 11 October 2013. I asked former members of his laboratory for their thoughts on his career and what he meant to them. Read More

Scientists Capture Most Detailed Picture Yet of Key AIDS Protein

Collaborating scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and Weill Cornell Medical College have determined the first atomic-level structure of the tripartite HIV envelope protein—long considered one of the most difficult targets in structural biology and of great value for medical scien... Read More

Are Farm Veterinarians Pushing Too Many Antibiotics?

In a barn outside Manhattan, Kan., researchers from Kansas State University are trying to solve the riddle of bovine respiratory disease. They're sticking plastic rods down the noses of six-month old calves, collecting samples of bacteria.

"This bacteria, Mannheimia haemolytica, lives in most... Read More

New Look at Old Test May Provide Earlier Detection of Meningitis

Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have found a more accurate method to screen for bacterial meningococcal infection in its early stages, when it's hardest to detect. According to the researchers, the method for diagnosis could save lives by getting patients treatment... Read More

Scientists raise alarm over today's measures against Legionellosis

According to the textbooks, both high doses of chlorine and hot water are lethal to legionella bacteria. But now Norwegian scientists are sounding the alarm that the bacteria can survive these treatments, by hiding in amoebae.

Legionella bacteria can cause deadly pneumonia via our shower wate... Read More

Biotransformation of Enniatins from Fusarium Fungi in a Food Safety Perspective

Mould species of the genera Fusarium and Altenaria are considered the most important threats to Norwegian grain cereals because they produce toxins which can be a potential risk to food safety. F. avenaceum, the fungi most frequently isolated from Norwegian grain, produces enniatins which have b... Read More

Syria polio outbreak confirmed by WHO

The World Health Organization (WHO) has confirmed 10 cases of polio in war-torn Syria - the first outbreak in the country in 14 years. The UN body says a further 12 cases are still being investigated. Most of the 22 people who have been tested are babies and toddlers. Before Syria's civil war be... Read More

Influenza virus activity in the world

Based on FluNet reporting (as of 18 October 2013, 11:35 UTC), during weeks 40 to 41 (29 September 2013 to 12 October 2013), National Influenza Centres (NICs) and other national influenza laboratories from 81 countries, areas or territories reported data. The WHO GISRS laboratories tested more th... Read More

Glowing Antibiotics Reveal Bacterial Infections

Despite surgeons’ best efforts, bacteria often manage to sneak onto medical implants such as bone screws, where they can cause severe infections. Research published today in Nature Communications suggests that using fluorescent antibiotics could reveal such infections before they become too seve... Read More

NDSU Researchers Find a Key That May Help Combat E. coli

The NDSU Department of Veterinary and Microbiological Sciences researchers discovered that B-phenylethylamine, or PEA, reduced the number of cells of Escherichia coli in a beef broth. PEA is a substance found in chocolate in trace amounts. Health food stores sell it in pill form to improve peopl... Read More

New bacteria species in purple mat in cave

In a hot, steamy lava cave on the Kilauea Caldera in Hawai’i, microbiologists collecting samples from a dripping purple mat on the cave floor have found a new species that could reveal how bacteria that spit oxygen into the atmosphere millions of years ago evolved.

Click on 'source' to read m... Read More

Research identifies how bacteria produce hydrogen

Making hydrogen easily and cheaply is a dream goal for clean, sustainable energy. Bacteria have been doing exactly that for billions of years, and now chemists at the University of California, Davis, and Stanford University are revealing how they do it, and perhaps opening ways to imitate them.
... Read More

Paper device spots antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Scientists in Canada have developed a paper-based device that checks if bacteria are resistant to certain antibiotics. The simple system could help users in remote areas pick the most appropriate treatment for bacterial infections.

Click on 'source' to read more Read More

Get dangerous germs out of your home

(upwave.com) -- Even if you're one of the many people who believe that exposing yourself to day-to-day germs is healthy for your immune system, it's still wise to take steps to protect yourself from the most infectious germs in your home. "Bugs like Escherichia coli (E.coli), salmonella and camp... Read More

Model Virus Structure Shows Why There's No Cure for the Common Cold

Rhinovirus C is believed to be responsible for up to half of all childhood colds, and is a serious complicating factor for respiratory conditions such as asthma. Together with rhinoviruses A and B, the recently discovered virus is responsible for millions of illnesses yearly at an estimated annu... Read More

Scientists discover why newborns get sick so often

If you think cold and flu season is tough, trying being an infant. A new research finding published in the November 2013 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology sheds new light on why newborns appear to be so prone to getting sick with viruses—they are born without one of the key proteins need... Read More

Malaria cases in US at highest count since 1971; nearly all cases brought in by travelers

U.S. malaria cases are at their highest level in four decades, mostly from Americans bringing home an unwelcome souvenir from their travels.

Malaria is not a big problem in the U.S. — there were only 1,925 cases in 2011, including five deaths. But cases were up 14 percent from the previous ye... Read More

Staph infections and eczema: What’s the connection?

For the millions of people suffering from the intensely red, horribly itchy skin condition known as eczema, the only thing more maddening than their disease is the lack of understanding of what causes it, or makes it flare up from time to time.

In a paper published online in Nature, the team ... Read More

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