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In Shaping Our Immune Systems, Some 'Friendly' Bacteria May Play Inordinate Role

Out of the trillions of "friendly" bacteria -- representing hundreds of species -- that make our intestines their home, new evidence in mice suggests that it may be a very select few that shape our immune responses. The findings detailed in two October 16th reports appearing in the journals Cell... Read More

Antibiotic research: the kryptonite of superbugs

HOSPITAL-ACQUIRED infections are a scourge that kill and injure patients and impose a heavy cost burden on the nation’s health care system, so much so that policy makers are debating the idea of rewarding hospitals that reduce their infection rate and punishing those that don’t. This makes sense... Read More

E. coli could be used to plug holes in pipes

Students in Aberdeen are developing a revolutionary technique that could see E. coli being used to plumb leaks in pipes.

Students in Aberdeen are developing a revolutionary technique that could see E. coli being used to plumb leaks in pipes.

Certain strains of the bacteria, which are not h... Read More

The differences between adaptive and random genetic changes during the evolution of E. coli

After Twenty-one years and 40,000 generations of bacteria later, Richard Lenski, professor of microbial ecology at Michigan State University, reveals new details about the differences between adaptive and random genetic changes during evolution in E. coli.

"Sequencing genomes of various gene... Read More

Three Hogs in Minnesota test positive for H1N1

In late August of this year, three hogs at the Minnesota State Fair tested positive for H1N1, aka Swine Flu, according to the Department of Agriculture's veterinary lab in Ames, Iowa.

"The department said the test results were preliminary and would not be confirmed for a few days. But if the ... Read More

Have your rotten food or dead bugs scanned with a benchtop SEM for free!

The ASPEX Corporation, a leader in scanning electron microscopes and microanalysis software, is offering a free benchtop SEM scan of anything you can think to send them! Past submissions have included mold, cat hair, a penny and an assortment of other random objects. This is a unique opportunity... Read More

HAART treatment protects against HIV transmission to newborns, study says

Mothers receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) to treat HIV-1 infection are less likely than untreated mothers to transmit the virus to their newborns through breastfeeding, according to a new study. The findings, now available online in the Nov. 15 issue of The Journal of Infect... Read More

Scientists call for paradigm shift in how we approach infectious disease and population mobility

When people travel, pathogens often hitch a ride with them. As about a billion people cross international borders each year, microbes are being spread farther and wider than ever before.

In a paper published in Emerging Infectious Diseases (EID), a journal of the U.S. Centers for Disease Cont... Read More

2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccine Supply Status

In an era of transparency, the CDC is doing it's part by posting every Friday the H1N1 vaccine supply status for all states and U.S. territories. Click "source" to view the status of allocations, orders and shipments. Read More

Obscure gut microbe keeps mice immune systems in check

Medical researchers have long suspected that obscure bacteria living within the intestinal tract may help keep the human immune system in balance. An international collaboration co-led by scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center has now identified a bizarre-looking microbial species that can sin... Read More

Student research raises hope for future

Here's a nice story from the Rider News, the student newspaper of Rider University in Lawrenceville, NJ, on how the American Society for Microbiology supports undergraduate research.

"The research of two senior biology majors may have an effect on the medicines of the future, and they have t... Read More

New AAM Report out Now - Antibiotic Resistance: An Ecological Perspective on an Old Problem

The American Academy of Microbiology has just published a colloquium report entitled "Antibiotic Resistance: An Ecological Perspective on an Old Problem."

According to the report, it is possible to co-exist with resistance by- developing new strategies to prevent resistance from spreading and... Read More

Industry Built From Scratch

A business profile on the biofuels industry, noting how it is getting very close to becoming economically viable. Read More

Earlier exposure to influenza may provide some immunity to current H1N1 strains

University of California, Davis, researchers studying the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus have identified a group of immunologically important sites on the virus that are also present in seasonal flu viruses that have been circulating for years. These molecular sites appear to result in some level of ... Read More

Don't be quick to blame the whiskey and smokes for throat cancer, HPV may be the new culprit

Oncologist Maura Gillison at Ohio State University and researchers from the National Cancer Institute estimate that 4,000 people, 75% of them men, develop a new form of tonsil cancer each year caused by the human papillomavirus.

"The old cigarettes-and-alcohol form of the disease is being ecl... Read More

Is the person next to you washing their hands with soap?

People are more likely to wash their hands when they have been shamed into it, according to a study by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

The study, published in the American Journal of Public Health, looked at responses to electronic hygiene messages displayed in UK service st... Read More

Earlier Flu Viruses Provided Some Immunity To Current H1N1 Influenza, Study Shows

"University of California, Davis, researchers studying the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus, formerly referred to as "swine flu," have identified a group of immunologically important sites on the virus that are also present in seasonal flu viruses that have been circulating for years. These molecular s... Read More

Bug Barcode Readers Hold Out Promise Of Universal Vaccines

"Veterinary scientists have made a discovery that promises to deliver a new approach to fast development of cheap vaccines that are effective in all mammals – not just humans or another particular species. They propose that by harnessing the system that reads the biological ‘barcodes’ of infecti... Read More

UMD's Center for Vaccine Development chart genetic variability in malaria parasite

Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine Center for Vaccine Development (CVD) have charted the extreme genetic differences that occur over time in the most dangerous malaria parasite in the world. While there is no approved vaccine for malaria, various experimental vaccines a... Read More

Canadian Government Invests $2.4 million in H1N1 Research

The Government of Canada through the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) today announced support for five new research projects designed to help further understand and address the H1N1 flu virus.

"Canada is a global leader in H1N1 flu virus research, including research with our inte... Read More

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