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Platypus Technologies Wins $2.2M DoD Contract for Nano Sensing Tech

Platypus Technologies has been awarded a $2.2 million federal contract from the US Department of Defense to further develop molecular sensing technology, the company said this week.

The one-year contract with the Edgewood Chemical and Biological Center in Maryland expands on work completed ea... Read More

Flu vaccine doesn't work in arthritis patients treated with rituximab

Arthritis patients being treated with the drug rituximab should be given flu vaccinations immediately before treatment begins or several months later, but not in the first two months after treatment, Dutch researchers have found. The vaccine is not dangerous when given after treatment with the d... Read More

Papillomavirus silences innate immune response

In the 1980s, Harald zur Hausen and his co-workers discovered that specific types of human papillomavirus (HPV) cause cervical cancer. Scientists soon found out how these pathogens cause cells to degenerate. It is known today that the main culprits are viral proteins E6 and E7. Both proteins swi... Read More

H1N1 Virus Spreads Easily by Plane

Scientists already know that smallpox, measles, tuberculosis, seasonal influenza and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) can be transmitted during commercial flights. Now, in the first study to predict the number of H1N1 flu infections that could occur during a flight, UCLA researchers foun... Read More

XMRV not detected in UK chronic fatigue syndrome patients

A new retrovirus, xenotropic murine leukaemia virus-related virus (XMRV), first identified in tumor tissue of individuals with prostate cancer, was subsequently found in 68 of 101 US patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). This observation raised the possibility that XMRV is the etiologic ... Read More

3-D bio-printer makes human tissue and organs

Invetech has announced that it has delivered the world's first production model 3D bio-printer to Organovo, developers of the proprietary NovoGen bioprinting technology. Organovo will supply the units to research institutions investigating human tissue repair and organ replacement.

According ... Read More

For this microbe, cousins not particularly welcome

The scientists' report, which appears in a recent issue of Current Biology, also provides further evidence that cooperation in nature is not always a festival of peace and love. Rather, cooperation may be more of a grudging necessity, in which partners continually compete and undermine one anoth... Read More

Giving Cells a Fresh Start

Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) researchers and their colleagues have identified an enzyme that can effectively wipe a cell’s developmental slate clean, essentially giving a fresh start. The enzyme, which is thought to help genetically reprogram fertilized eggs as part of normal developme... Read More

Get ready for China's domination of science

Since its economic reform began in 1978, China has gone from being a poor developing country to the second-largest economy in the world. China has also emerged from isolation to become a political superpower. Its meteoric rise has been one of the most important global changes of recent years: th... Read More

Another Reason to Save Coral? Reefs Are Responsible for Ocean Biodiversity

The Great Barrier Reef is the largest living structure on Earth. It might also represent the most prolific cradle for new types of animals on the planet, according to new research published in the January 8 edition of Science.

"In the oceans, new species and genera tend to originate in the tr... Read More

Researchers Discover Antibody Receptor Identity, Propose Renaming Immune-System Gene

Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) have uncovered the genetic identity of a cellular receptor for the immune system's first-response antibody, a discovery that sheds new light on infection control and immune disorders. The discovery is such a crucial part of immunology ... Read More

Gallery of science tattoos (revisted)

We've previously posted this gallery of science tattoos here at MicrobeWorld.org but with a new write up on BoingBoing.net and an ever-growing collection of tattoos, we thought it was worth another look.

Carl Zimmer, now the host of Meet The Scientist found here on MicrobeWorld, "once wondere... Read More

Viral phenomenon: Ancient microbe invaded human DNA

Humans carry in their genome the relics of an animal virus that infected their forerunners at least 40 million years ago, according to research published Wednesday by the British science journal Nature.

The invader is called bornavirus, a brain-infecting pathogen that was first identified in ... Read More

Mundo de los Microbios - Episodio 35



A la búsqueda de los patógenos de los cultivos


Algunos temen que los terroristas fijen su objetivo en los alimentos e infecten deliberadamente cultivos tales como el maíz y e... Read More

Cuts to science are creating the perfect storm

(Ed. note - this article is from the UK, but I imagine researchers around the world are facing similar challenges)

Scientists like me work in laboratories and teach students. Our skills and expertise are grounded in the extensive training in the laboratory practical classes we received as stu... Read More

How Clean Are Your New Clothes? Find Out

When you buy new clothes, you expect them to be new, not already worn by someone else. But that's not always the case.

Consider what happens after you return a pair of pants or a blouse. Often it goes right back on the rack, to be resold instead of staying in the back room, retail experts to... Read More

Stomach-Cancer Bug Linked to Cancer-Promoting Factor

Researchers report that Helicobacter pylori, the only bacterium known to survive in the harsh environment of the human stomach, directly activates an enzyme in host cells that has been associated with several types of cancer, including gastric cancer.

Chronic infection with H. pylori is a wel... Read More

Thirsty? Bacteria linked to feces found on soda fountains

If you're chugging a soda from a fast food joint, you may want to put it down and read this.

A team of microbiologists from Hollins University found that 48% of the sodas they tested from fast food soda fountains had coliform bacteria, according to Tom Laskawy, a media and technology professi... Read More

Hospitals Could Stop Infections by Tackling Bacteria Patients Bring In, Studies Find

Hundreds of thousands of patients each year suffer from infections after surgery, and experts say more than half of those infections stem from bacteria the patients themselves are carrying in their nose or on their skin. Otherwise harmless bacteria can enter the body through surgical incisions a... Read More

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

Shortly after I wrote about my years of experience with HeLa cells, I was contacted by author Rebecca Skloot. One of her many questions was how I knew that I had produced 800 billion HeLa cells in my laboratory over 26 years. I learned that she was writing a book about Henrietta Lacks, whose tum... Read More

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