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Archaea: The Third Domain of Life - (Do They Live on Comets?)

The biodiversity of the Earth never ceases to astonish. One example that has radically changed the face of biology is the discovery of a group of organisms called archaea (pronounced “ar-kee-ah”). It was thought that all creatures on Earth were divided into two main evolutionary categories, but ... Read More

‘Roach Motels’ for Bacteria

In the age-old battle between man and microbe, people have tried in countless ways to keep their surroundings germ-free, ranging from plain old scrubbing, heat sterilization and chemical disinfectants to high-tech solutions like irradiation or drug-eluting coatings.

Now a new approach could m... Read More

Bacteria under SOS evolve anticancer phenotypes (abstract)

The anticancer drugs, such as DNA replication inhibitors, stimulate bacterial adhesion and induce the bacterial SOS response. As a variety of bacterial mutants can be generated during SOS, novel phenotypes are likely to be selected under the drug pressure.Presentation of the hypothesisBacteria g... Read More

Did Bacteria Developed Into More Complex Cells Much Earlier in Evolution Than Thought?

Monash University biochemists have found a critical piece in the evolutionary puzzle that explains how life on Earth evolved millions of centuries ago.

The team, from the School of Biomedical Sciences, has described the process by which bacteria developed into more complex cells and found thi... Read More

Compound LJ001 Acts Like Antibiotic Against Viruses

Unlike antibiotics, which kill many different types of bacteria, antiviral drugs for the most part need to target individual, specific viruses. A drug that attacks a multitude of viruses -- an antibiotic for viruses, effectively -- would be a significant boon for medicine. And a group of researc... Read More

Smart coating opens door to safer hip, knee and dental implants

Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed a "smart coating" that helps surgical implants bond more closely with bone and ward off infection.

When patients have hip, knee or dental replacement surgery, they run the risk of having their bodies reject the implant. But the sma... Read More

Vaccine to Protect Pregnant Women from Contracting Malaria?

Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have become the first in the world to synthesize the entire protein that is responsible for life-threatening malaria in pregnant women and their unborn children. The protein known as VAR2CSA enables malaria parasites to accumulate in the placenta and c... Read More

Australians On Guard against Acinetobacter

Australian researchers are scrambling to develop drugs to fight off Acinetobacter baumanii, a new "superbug" that is causing fatalities overseas.

Experts say Acinetobacter is far worse than superbugs such as MRSA, which are already in Australian hospitals.

Australian health authorities sa... Read More

Origin of the cell nucleus, mitosis and sex: roles of intracellular coevolution

Thomas Cavalier-Smith, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, has published a paper in which he identifies some of the key elements to understanding eukaryogenesis.

"Here I paint an integrated picture of how the nucleus, sex, and the eukaryotic cell cycle originated and congealed into ... Read More

Fecal Odor May Yield Faster Test for Diarrhea Bug

A new device that sniffs out malodorous bacteria in stool samples may yield the first rapid test for a potentially lethal diarrheal disease spreading across North America and Europe.

The OdoReader can detect the bacterium Clostridium difficile in about 10 minutes with 96 percent accuracy, sai... Read More

Scientists create artificial honey bee silk

Using genetically modified bacteria, a team of Australian researchers has created artificially produced honey bee silk.

"The silks would be good for tough, lightweight textiles, and high-strength applications like advanced aviation and marine composites," ABC Science quoted CSIRO entomologis... Read More

Bacteria Toxic to Wound-Treating Maggots

Bacteria that infect chronic wounds can be deadly to maggot 'biosurgeons' used to treat the lesions, show researchers writing in the journal Microbiology. The findings could lead to more effective treatment of wounds and the development of novel antibiotics.

Scientists from the Copenhagen Wou... Read More

NSF & Microsoft team up to bring cloud computing to U.S. scientists

The new three-year program from the National Science Foundation and Microsoft announced on Thursday at a news conference in Washington offers scientists the computing power to cope with exploding amounts of research data. It uses Microsoft’s Windows Azure computing system, which the company rece... Read More

President Obama Announces Three Steps to Boost Biofuels

President Barack Obama announced on February 3 three actions that the federal government is taking to boost U.S. biofuels production. The measures include: the final rule from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to implement the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS) of 36 billion gallons by ... Read More

Immune Protein Fends Off Exotic Virus

A study published online on February 1 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine shows that antiviral proteins called type I interferons (IFNs) are needed to fend off infection with an exotic mosquito-borne virus called Chikungunya virus.

This pathogen, which causes high fevers and severe joint... Read More

Too many seniors not immunized against pneumonia, report says

Pneumonia is by far the leading killer of seniors who contract either seasonal or pandemic H1N1 influenza, but far too many of the elderly are not immunized against it, according to a report issued Thursday by the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the... Read More

New virus-detecting lab on a chip gets even better

A team of engineers and chemists at Brigham Young University has created a silicon microchip they say can reliably detect specific proteins or viruses from even small samples at low concentrations. Their invention, which is forthcoming in the paper version of the journal Lab on a Chip, work... Read More

Toxicology of the Tiny

Already incorporated into consumer products ranging from baseball bats and clothing to sunscreens and toothpaste, engineered nanoparticles — ENPs — hold great promise in such areas as energy, pollution remediation, medicine and materials science. The nanotechnology industry is projected to be wo... Read More

Detecting disease with a little TLC

A simple, low cost method to detect toxins from the organism causing the wasting disease Buruli ulcer has been developed by US scientists.

Buruli ulcer is a wasting disease caused by organisms called Mycobacterium Ulcerans, which are in the same group as the organisms causing leprosy and tub... Read More

Chemists Discover How Antiviral Drugs Bind to and Block Flu Virus

Antiviral drugs block influenza A viruses from reproducing and spreading by attaching to a site within a proton channel necessary for the virus to infect healthy cells, according to a research project led by Iowa State University's Mei Hong and published in the Feb. 4 issue of the journal Nature... Read More

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