Podcasts

mwv89thumbWatch Latest Video Subscribe to Video Feed

ICAAC-Live-Banner

twiv_banner

twim_mwsite_badge

bacteriofilesbanner

isbadge

yellowstonelogo

Subscribe Learn More

mts_banner

This Week in Parasitism

a-radio

MicrobeWorld App

appsquarebannerad200x200

ASM Fellowships

Fellowship

Microbes After Hours

WaterSupplyYouTubeFrame

Click for more "Microbes After Hours" videos

Join MicrobeWorld

Subscribe via Email

subscribe

Featured Image

Featured Video

Ebola Virus explained

Supporters

ASM House 200X200

Getting Started with MicrobeWorld

More "How to" Videos:
| |
|

FBI closes anthrax case, says scientist was killer

Wrapping up one of its most vexing investigations, the FBI concluded that Army scientist Bruce Ivins acted alone in the 2001 anthrax mailings that killed five people and further unnerved a nation still reeling from the 9/11 attacks.

The agency formally closed the case Friday, ending the long... Read More

Corals Partner Up With Heat-Resistant Algae

Corals around the world, already threatened by pollution, destructive fishing practices and other problems, are also widely regarded as among the ecosystems likely to be first — and most — threatened with destruction as earth’s climate warms.

But there is reason to hope, researchers are repor... Read More

Fight HIV with HIV: 'safe' virus proposed as vaccine

A company is planning to inject people with an HIV vaccine made of the deadly virus itself, albeit a deactivated version.

Vaccines against many viruses, including flu, are made from deactivated versions of those viruses, but such an approach was previously dismissed as too risky in the case o... Read More

A Prophage Masquerade

Small Things Considered blogger Merry Youle has authored a post on the sequencing of Roseovarius nubinhibens. a bacterium that recently joined the group of about a thousand bacteria whose genomes have been sequenced. Researcher José González and colleagues in Mary Ann Moran's lab at the Universi... Read More

New vaccine storage technology could revolutionize immunization in the developing world

British researchers have devised a way to capture vaccines in a glass-like membrane composed of sugar, a feat that could eliminate the need for refrigeration of vaccines and revolutionize their distribution in the developing world. Tests have shown that the technique can preserve vaccines for as... Read More

Biologists discover how biological clock controls cell division in bacteria

A team of biologists has unraveled the biochemistry of how bacteria so precisely time cell division, a key element in understanding how all organisms from bacteria to humans use their biological clocks to control basic cellular functions.

The discovery, detailed in the February 19 issue of th... Read More

Roundworm Bacteria Research Shows Promise for Development of New Antibiotics

In a finding that bodes well for the development of new human antibiotics, Harvard researchers have determined the identity of the trigger that causes roundworm bacteria to excrete virulent substances.

Harvard Medical School Professor Jon Clardy teamed with researchers in the department of bi... Read More

Fighting Back Against a Superbug

When a bacterium evolves resistance to a particular antibiotic, it's problematic. When it evolves defenses against antibiotics in general, as Pseudomonas aeruginosa has done, it's terrifying. But now researchers have devised an antibiotic that attacks the germ in a completely new way that appear... Read More

DNA Precipitation: Ethanol vs. Isopropanol - a discussion of best practices

Since our most popular article of all time (“The Basics: How Ethanol Precipitation of DNA and RNA Works”) was published, many Bitesize Bio readers have asked us to further explain the difference between precipitating DNA with ethanol vs. isopropanol and which is the better choice. This article d... Read More

Higher Pneumococcal Disease Vaccination Rates Needed to Protect More At-Risk US Adults

The American Society for Microbiology, the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID), and other leading medical and health organizations agree that pneumococcal immunization rates among adults need to be improved to reduce the impact of pneumococcal illness and death in this population.... Read More

Flu virus sometimes fights secondary infections

Influenza doesn't kill, though it can damage the lungs. Instead, it's the secondary infections that come in its wake, things like bacterial pneumonia and pneumococcal infections, that take lives.

Now researchers at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven have discovered that the pr... Read More

MSU awarded $25 million for NSF center to study evolution in action

Michigan State University announced today that it was awarded a $25 million grant from the National Science Foundation to establish a center, bringing together scientists from across the nation to study evolution in action in both natural and virtual settings.

MSU has been awarded one of five... Read More

MTS44 Michael Worobey - In Search of the Origin of HIV and H1N1's Hidden History

Unable to embed Rapid1Pixelout audio player. Please double check that:  1)You have the latest version of Adobe Flash Player.  2)This web page does not have any fatal Javascript errors.  3)The audio-player.js file of Rapid1Pixelout has been included.


Read More

'Secret Weapon' of Retroviruses That Cause Cancer

Oncogenic retroviruses are a particular family of viruses that can cause some types of cancer. Thierry Heidmann and his colleagues in the CNRS-Institut Gustave Roussy-Université Paris Sud 11 "Rétrovirus endogènes et éléments rétroïdes des eucaryotes supérieurs" Laboratory have studied these viru... Read More

Attacking Implant Infections

Nearly 1 million people undergo a hip, knee or shoulder replacement every year, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, and in about 1 to 2 percent of those cases, an implant gets infected. The most common cause of these infections is a type of bacteria Staphylococcus epidermi... Read More

Detachable needles on syringes promote hepatitis C transmission, study says

The high incidence of hepatitis C infections among drug abusers may be due in part to the use of syringes with detachable needles, which are more likely to transfer viable viruses from one user to the next, Yale University researchers will report Friday. Their study is reputed to be the first th... Read More

Natural Selection acts on gene networks

Natural selection – the force that drives evolution – acts not only on whole organisms and individual genes, but also on gene networks, according to a new study appearing in Nature this week.The finding suggests that natural selection is both more powerful and more complex than scientists recogn... Read More

Popular Misconceptions about DNA Isolation and Quantification

Problems achieving high yield and purity DNA are exaggerated in environmental samples because of the added complexity of microorganism lysis and inhibitor removal. Quantifying the nucleic acids in these samples is the easy part. But if you don’t know what to look for, you can easily make mista... Read More

Further Doubt Cast on Virus Link to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Researchers investigating UK samples have found no association between the controversial xenotropic murine leukaemia virus-related virus (XMRV) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Their study, published in BioMed Central's open access journal Retrovirology, calls into question a potential link d... Read More

Monitoring H1N1 with Twitter--interview with Philip Polgreen of the University of Iowa

Micro-blogging via Twitter is being evaluated as a means for tracking infectious diseases. The 2009 outbreak of H1N1 provided them an opportunity for testing Twitter as an approach for tracking disease outbreaks. From the end of April, researchers at the University of Iowa began collecting Twitt... Read More

American Society for Microbiology
2012 1752 N Street, N.W. • Washington, DC 20036-2904 • (202) 737-3600
American Society For Microbiology © 2014   |   Privacy Policy   |   Terms of Use