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TWiM 65 Letters

Alexandra writes:


Dear TWIM-ers,


When I began listening to TWIV almost a year ago, I had just switched majors from philosophy to biology. I am now writing to you good people at TWIM at the end of my first undergraduate summer research gig, where I have had qui... Read More

Prototype iPhone biosensor detects viruses, bacteria, toxins, allergens

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a versatile iPhone-based biosensor that, with about $200 worth of parts, is just as accurate as a $50,000 laboratory spectrophotometer.

The system, consisting of an iPhone cradle and an app, can detect viruses, bacte... Read More

TWiV 252: Who read the last email?



Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Read More

Scientists Study What to Do If You Drop a Cookie on the Floor

Once again, you've dropped your snack. You bend down, snatch it up, and gently blow off any dust—and, you hope, deadly germs. You're about to put it in your mouth because, after all, you've got the "five-second rule" on your side: Food that's been dropped is safe to consume if it's been on the f... Read More

TWiP 59 letters

Allan writes:


You have the best podcast on the web, hands down. I use your TWiP episodes in both my undergraduate and graduate classes.
Thanks.


I've recently seen a family in Hawaii with recurrent pathogenic Blastocystis hominis and Dientamoeba fragilis a... Read More

TWiM 57 Letters

Wink writes:


Great HAI work! I'm not through it yet. I want to question, though, whether fomites are really important in influenza transmission. I don't think so.
Wink Weinberg (ID)


[flu can transmit by fomites in guinea pigs: Read More

TWiV 245: Writing Principles of Virology



Host: Vincent Racaniello


Read More

Death toll from H1N1 rises as strain returns, with ‘young invincibles’ most affected

The H1N1 virus responsible for the 2009 global pandemic is back. State health officials from across the country say the resurgence is resulting in a dramatic rise in flu deaths in young and middle-aged adults and in children this season.

While the reported death tolls so far are only a fracti... Read More

Rare bacteria outbreak linked to Chicago hospital

CHICAGO, Jan. 6 (UPI) -- The largest outbreak ever of a rare but potentially deadly bacteria has been tied to equipment in a Chicago-area hospital, health officials said.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said 44 cases of infection by the bacteria carbapenem-resistant enterobacteri... Read More

TWiV 275: Virocentricity with Eugene Koonin



 Hosts: Vincent Racaniello and Rich Condit Read More

At least 59 people dead in Guinea Ebola outbreak

An Ebola outbreak has killed at least 59 people in Guinea, UNICEF said, as the deadly hemorrhagic fever has quickly spread from southern communities in the West African nation.

Experts in the country had been unable to identify the disease, whose symptoms -- diarrhea, vomiting and fever -- we... Read More

BacterioFiles Micro Edition 158 - Partners Provide Protein

This episode: Different bacteria working together can thrive better than when working alone!


(9.9 MB, 10.75 minutes)


Show notes: 
News item/ Read More

Chinese scientists slammed for creating mutant influenza virus in laboratory

Chinese scientists are being criticized for their “appalling irresponsibility” after they intentionally developed a new mutant influenza strain in a veterinary laboratory, the Independent reported.

Experts have warned that the new virus strains could potentially escape the lab, which could c... Read More

TWiV 237: Paleovirology with Michael Emerman



Hosts: Vincent Racaniello and Rich Condit Read More

The Science of Cheese Is Weirder Than You Think

The science behind the transformation from plants to milk to cheese is amazing. In fact, cheese has much in common with wine and beer: They result from fermentation by microorganisms; they are “value-added” products where processing greatly increases the value; and they reflect local climate and... Read More

Ground Turkey Study Finds More Than Half Of Samples Contaminated With Fecal Bacteria

More than half of ground turkey samples are contaminated with fecal bacteria, according to a new study from Consumer Reports. In addition, the magazine found that more than 90 percent of the ground turkey samples it tested contained at least one of the five bacteria the test was looking for -- s... Read More

TWiM 69 Letters

Gian writes:


Beloved TWiMers,


Did you see this paper in PLoS Computational Biology? It's mind-blowing. U. Maryland researchers found evidence for Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas nucleic acid integrated into human chromosomes and mitochondria, po... Read More

MRSA Strain in Humans Originally Came from Cattle

A strain of bacteria that causes skin and soft tissue infections in humans originally came from cattle, according to a study to be published in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. The researchers who conducted the genetic analysis of strains of Staphyl... Read More

BacterioFiles Micro Edition 144 - Copper Chelator Calms Quicksilver

This episode: Bacteria could reduce mercury's toxicity in their environment!


(6.5 MB, 7 minutes)


Methanotrophs (bacteria that use methane for their carbon and energy) secrete siderophore-like compounds that are usually used to chelate copper and make it more bioavailable, but ... Read More

BacterioFiles Micro Edition 131 - Stacking Sucker Symbionts

This episode: Some insects have bacterial symbionts with super-small genomes inside their cells, and some of these symbionts have their own internal bacterial symbionts!


{joomp3_ext} Read More

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