Podcasts

MWVThumbVideoSmallWatch Latest Video Subscribe to Video Feed

ICAAC-Live-Banner

twiv_banner

twim_mwsite_badge

bacteriofilesbanner

isbadge

yellowstonelogo

Subscribe Learn More

mts_banner

This Week in Parasitism

a-radio

MicrobeWorld App

appsquarebannerad200x200

Microbes After Hours

MWbannerEbola

Click for more "Microbes After Hours" videos

Join MicrobeWorld

Subscribe via Email

subscribe

Featured Image

Featured Video

Ebola Virus explained

Supporters

ASM House 200X200

Getting Started with MicrobeWorld

More "How to" Videos:
| |
|

Breakdown in gut barriers to bacteria may promote inflammation and craving in alcoholics

Bacteria in the GI tract fulfill many vital functions and are critical for digestion. Yet, these same bacteria can induce strong inflammatory responses by the immune system if they penetrate the gut and enter the bloodstream. Prior research has established the involvement of inflammatory process... Read More

Nobel Laureates and Ebola virus quarantine

After the governors of New York and New Jersey decided that health workers who have returned from the Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa should be subject to a 21-day quarantine, two Nobel laureates entered the fray. Bruce Beutler feels that the quarantine is the right thing to do, while Peter ... Read More

Researchers identify DNA of algae virus in humans

The DNA of a virus once thought confined to the cells of algae may in fact invade the biological kingdom of mice and men, according to a new study from researchers at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

The researchers, whose paper appeared Oct. 27 in... Read More

Curiosity is the currency of science (a Nature blog article featuring Antonie van Leeuwenhoek and Robert Hooke!)

Enough doom and gloom articles about science funding and jobs! This very microbiology centered new three part series at blogs.nature.com looks back at the history of funding and argues that there is much more reason for optimism than pessimism for the future of science. Read More

Contaminomics: Why Some Microbiome Studies May Be Wrong

You’ve got a group of people with a mysterious disease, and you suspect that some microbe might be responsible. You collect blood and tissue samples, you extract the DNA from them using a commonly used kit of chemicals, and you sequence the lot. Eureka! You find that every patient has the same m... Read More

New Tools in Fight Against Virus that Attacks the Brain

Researchers have developed new insight into a rare but deadly brain infection, called progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). This disease – which is caused by the JC virus – is most frequently found in people with suppressed immune systems and, until now, scientists have had no effect... Read More

How Bacteria In The Gut Help Fight Off Viruses

If it was a snake, it would have bitten us.

The secret to stopping a deadly stomach virus may be sitting right there in our guts, scientists reported Thursday in the journal Science. Or more specifically, the treatment is in our microbiome — the trillions of bacteria that inconspicuously hang... Read More

Single-dose, needle-free Ebola vaccine provides long-term protection in macaques

Scientists have demonstrated for the first time that a single-dose, needleless Ebola vaccine given to primates through their noses and lungs protected them against infection for at least 21 weeks. A vaccine that doesn’t require an injection could help prevent passing along infections through uni... Read More

Facets of the flu

Ebola has captured the attention of the world since the outbreak in West Africa began months ago, so far claiming more than 5,000 lives.

Closer to home, seasonal influenza is on its way. Aside from bringing brief misery to many, the flu leads to serious complications or even death for tens of... Read More

New influenza virus affects cattle, pigs

A new influenza virus, discovered in pigs and later found in cows, shares common ancestry with known influenza viruses, but is distinct enough that researchers have proposed calling it Type D Influenza.

Click "source" to read more. Read More

How cells defend themselves against antibiotics, cytostatic agents

ABC Transporters are proteins that are embedded in the cell membrane and facilitate the transport across cellular barriers not only of an almost unlimited variety of toxic substances, but also of substances that are essential for life. They also play a role in the development of antibiotic resis... Read More

Our wine owes a debt to ancient viruses

Next time you pour a glass of wine, raise a toast to the 30-milion-year-old viruses that have contributed to the genetic make-up of modern grapes.

A team of UQ-led plant scientists has discovered that the Pinot Noir grape variety owes a significant part of its genetic heritage to ancient plan... Read More

Complex Life Owes Its Existence To Parasites?

Is complex life rare in the cosmos? The idea that it could be rests on the observation that the existence of life like us – with large, energy hungry, complicated cells – may be contingent on a number of very specific and unlikely factors in the history of the Earth. Added together they suggest ... Read More

Scripps Research Institute Scientists Reveal Weak Spots in Ebola’s Defenses

New Study Exposes How ZMapp Therapy Attacks Virus and Suggests Strategies to Improve It.

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have identified weak spots on the surface of Ebola virus that are targeted by the antibodies in ZMapp, the experimental drug cocktail administered to se... Read More

UCI team develops test to rapidly diagnose bloodstream infection

New technology can detect bacterial invaders with unprecedented speed, sensitivity.

A new bloodstream infection test created by UC Irvine researchers can speed up diagnosis times with unprecedented accuracy, allowing physicians to treat patients with potentially deadly ailments more promptly... Read More

How Cells Know Which Way To Go

Two new studies shed light on how cells sense and respond to chemical trails. Amoebas aren’t the only cells that crawl: Movement is crucial to development, wound healing and immune response in animals, not to mention cancer metastasis. In two new studies from Johns Hopkins, researchers answer lo... Read More

New drug could make vaccines more effective in the elderly

Oxford University scientists have developed a new method of boosting the ageing immune system using a naturally occurring chemical compound.

Early tests in mice carried out by the research team have shown that the compound restores the immune system's inbuilt 'memory', enabling the body to mo... Read More

Genetic tweak gave yellow fever mosquitoes a nose for human odor

One of the world’s deadliest mosquitoes sustains its taste for human blood thanks in part to a genetic tweak that makes it more sensitive to human odor, according to new research.

Researchers report in the journal Nature that the yellow fever mosquito contains a version of an odor-detecting g... Read More

New Tool Could Help Reshape the Limits of Synthetic Biology

Developed at NYU Langone Medical Center, the “telomerator” reshapes synthetic yeast chromosome into more flexible, realistic form, redefining what geneticists can build.

NYU Langone yeast geneticists report they have developed a novel tool — dubbed “the telomerator” — that could redefine the ... Read More

Team discovers how microbes build a powerful antibiotic

Researchers have made a breakthrough in understanding how a powerful antibiotic agent is made in nature. Their discovery solves a decades-old mystery, and opens up new avenues of research into thousands of similar molecules, many of which are likely to be medically useful.

Click "source" to r... Read More
Page 3 of 7

American Society for Microbiology
2012 1752 N Street, N.W. • Washington, DC 20036-2904 • (202) 737-3600
American Society For Microbiology © 2014   |   Privacy Policy   |   Terms of Use