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TWiM #135: Unruly individuals and their unruly friends

How critical illness alters the microbiome, and the consequences of a sewage spill into an aquatic environment, from the TWiM team.


Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Elio... Read More

TWiM 135 Letters

Reed writes:


Dear Vincent, Elio, Michael, and Michelle,


I've just recently finished TWiM number 133 and wanted to comment about the use of the term "secondary metabolite" throughout the episode and often in the primary literature. Michael pointed out that a se... Read More

TWiV 407: Tar Heels go viral, part two

In the second of two shows recorded at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, Vincent meets up with faculty members to talk about how they got into science, their research on RNA viruses, and what they would be doing if they were not scientists.


Host:  Read More

Microbes help plants survive in severe drought

With California in its fifth year of severe drought and many western states experiencing another year of unusually dry conditions, plants are stressed.

Agricultural crops, grasses and garden plants alike can get sick and die when factors such as drought and excess sun force them to work harde... Read More

Earliest Signs Of Animal Life May Be From Microbes

Evidence suggests that microbes existed on Earth as far back as 3.7 billion years ago, a billion years after the planet formed. Animal remains, however, don't appear in the fossil record until 600 million years ago during the Ediacaran period, though there are indirect signs that animal life may... Read More

To understand the oceans' microbes, follow function, not form

A University of British Columbia mathematician may have discovered a key to understanding the constantly changing distribution of microbial species in the world's oceans—classify microorganisms by their biochemical function, rather than by their taxonomy.

Researchers have struggled to underst... Read More

Scientists triple known types of viruses in world's oceans

The world's oceans teem with scientific mystery, unknowns that could prove to be tools that will one day protect the planet from global warming.

An international research team now reports they've tripled the known types of viruses living in waters around the globe and have a better idea what ... Read More

New Hope in the Fight against Antimicrobial Resistance

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a chilling reality that my patients and I face every day. As an infectious diseases physician, I see increasing numbers of patients with serious or life-threatening infections, and I am running out of antibiotics to treat them. The emergence of MCR-1 and MCR-2—n... Read More

Tardigrade protein helps human DNA withstand radiation

Tardigrades, or water bears, are pudgy, microscopic animals that look like a cross between a caterpillar and a naked mole rat. These aquatic invertebrates are consummate survivors, capable of withstanding a host of extremes, including near total dehydration and the insults of space.

Now, a pa... Read More

ASM Members Deliver a Landslide Endorsement for Governance Change - Part 2

In my previous posting (Part 1), I reflected on the historical change of the new ASM governance. Here I would like to highlight some key issues that I see facing ASM and its new governance structure. This is not a prescriptive list, but rather a list of goals or, if you prefer, a straw man for ... Read More

ASM Announces Tools to Help Authors and Reviewers Alike

Communication of experimental results via publishing is one of the most important steps of the scientific method; if you don’t share your results, how will knowledge within a field grow? A well-written article contextualizes the author’s data into a broader scientific landscape, which allows rea... Read More

BacterioFiles 268 - Sophisticated Cyanobacterium Sight

This episode: Spherical cyanobacterium Synechocystis acts like a tiny eyeball in sensing light, allowing cells to move closer to light sources!


(9.7 MB, 10.6 minutes)


Show notes: synSEM Read More

TWiV 407: Tar Heels go viral, part one

In the first of two shows recorded at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, Vincent meets up with faculty members to talk about how they got into science, their research on DNA viruses, and what they would be doing if they were not scientists.


Host:  Read More

One antibody to neutralize them all: a human IgG1 is effective against multiple subtypes of influenza A virus

The changing weather reminds us that influenza season is around the corner, which means it’s nearly time to get your annual vaccine. This year’s vaccine is updated to protect against influenza A viruses H1N1 + H3N2 and influenza B virus Victoria lineage. These strains are included in vaccine pro... Read More

MMP #16: Insights into Toxoplasma gondii parasites

Host: Jeff Fox with special guest, Emma Wilson.


Emma H. Wilson of the University of California, Riverside, talks with Jeff Fox about efforts, with her collaborators to determine more precisely how Toxoplasma gondii parasites disrupt the mammalian brain—in this case, the brains of mice... Read More

A role for siderophores in Klebsiella pneumoniae pathogenesis

Despite increasing awareness of Klebsiella pneumoniae as a public health risk, there has been relatively little understood about its mechanisms of pathogenesis.

The bacterium, estimated to be the third most common cause of hospital-acquired infections in the United States in a recent study, c... Read More

BacterioFiles 267 - Crust Color Cooks Communities

This episode: Cyanobacteria in biocrusts produce pigments that heat their surroundings up to 10 degrees hotter!


(7 MB, 7.6 minutes)


Show notes: 
Read More

TWiV 406: Pow, right in the enteroids!

The TWiV team discusses eye infections caused by Zika virus, failure of Culex mosquitoes to transmit the virus, and replication of norovirus in stem cell derived enteroids.


Hosts:  Read More

Getting the hologenome concept right

Given the complexity of host-microbiota symbioses, scientists and philosophers are asking questions at new biological levels of hierarchical organization—what is a holobiont and hologenome? When should this vocabulary be applied? Are these concepts a null hypothesis for host-microbe systems or l... Read More

TWiP 116: One drug to rule them all

The TWiPtoids solve the case of the Thai Fisherman with Chronic Diarrhea, and reveal a potential new drug for treatment of leishmaniasis, Chagas diseases, and sleeping sickness.


Hosts: Vincent Racaniel... Read More

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