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Gold nanorods deliver antiviral punch

Future pandemics of seasonal flu, H1N1 and other drug-resistant viruses may be thwarted by a potent, immune-boosting payload that is effectively delivered to cells by gold nanorods, report scientists at the University at Buffalo and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Via Fu... Read More

Glowing Bacteria Light Up Ocean

This photo shows a petri dish swabbed with a culture of bioluminescent marine bacteria. The bacteria give off light using a process known as quorum sensing that is controlled by four small RNA molecules within each of them.

When only one bacterium is present it has the ability to produce li... Read More

Vaccination key to preventing childhood pneumonia in sub-Saharan Africa

Researchers at the University of Warwick, and the Kenya Medical Research Institute, Kilifi, Kenya, have found that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) appears to be the predominant virus detected among infants and children hospitalized in Kenya with severe pneumonia, according to a study in the Ma... Read More

NPR's Science Friday: Cleaning Up the Oil

(featuring former ASM President Dr. Ronald Atlas)

Efforts to implement a 'top kill,' pumping heavy mud into the broken riser pipe coming from the Deepwater Horizon oil well, are in progress, with hopeful signs. As oil experts continue to work to seal the gushing leak from the Deepwater Horizo... Read More

New Ebola Drug 100 Percent Effective In Monkeys

The Ebola virus first emerged in 1976, striking fear with the uncontrollable bleeding it causes and mortality rates up to 90 percent. Ever since then, scientists have been struggling to find a way to treat the infection or protect against it.

There has been progress, but nothing quite like t... Read More

Honeybee Death Mystery Deepens

A one-two punch by a gut parasite and viruses may help explain the mysterious decline in U.S. honeybees seen over the last four years.

Bees infected with both the fungal parasite Nosema ceranae and with any one of a handful of RNA viruses were much more likely to have come from hives on the d... Read More

El podcast del Microbio Nº 113 y 114: Ancestros comunes

The Nº 113 and 114 of "El podcast del microbio" summarize the Nature's article: "A formal test of the theory of universal common ancestry". En "El podcast del microbio" Nº 113 y 114 se resume el artículo aparecido en la revista Nature: "A formal test of the theory of universal common ancestry... Read More

Headless HA: Universal influenza vaccine?

A serious shortcoming of current influenza virus vaccines is the need to reformulate them every year or two as the virus undergoes antigenic drift. Many virologists have been captivated by the idea of a more universal vaccine that would endure longer, perhaps a decade or more. The identification... Read More

Ebola in the News

"Tests in four rhesus monkeys showed that seven daily injections cured 100 percent of them. And Geisbert said the researchers gave the monkeys an extremely high dose of Ebola."

The antivirus injections were given within an hour or so after infection. They are testing to see if they can extend... Read More

Novel Therapeutic Approach Shows Promise Against Multiple Bacterial Pathogens

A team of scientists from government, academia and private industry has developed a novel treatment that protects mice from infection with the bacterium that causes tularemia, a highly infectious disease of rodents, sometimes transmitted to people, and also known as rabbit fever. In additional e... Read More

Beach bacteria battle goes high-tech

So much for the old warning flag on a stick.

Confronting an almost unwinnable battle against E. coli and other bacteria on public beaches, Chicago and some of its suburbs have taken the fight into the digital age.

From computer models that can predict conditions where bacteria will thrive,... Read More

H1N1 outbreak in Alabama declared over

The H1N1 virus outbreak appears to be contained and conquered in Alabama, according to a report by WAFF.

Alabama State Health Department Spokesman Dr. Jim McVay told the news station that officials have gone three-plus weeks without seeing a confirmed H1N1 specimen brought into the lab.

"I... Read More

Modified measles virus may help treat childhood brain tumours

In a new study, a modified measles virus has shown potential for treating childhood brain tumour known as medulloblastoma.

Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant central nervous system tumour of childhood, accounting for about 20 percent of paediatric brain tumours.

These tumours ar... Read More

Bacteria Living in 'Cloud Cities' May Control Rain and Snow Patterns

Some bacteria can influence the weather. Up high in the sky where clouds form, water droplets condense and ice crystal grow around tiny particles. Typically these particles are dust, pollen, or even soot from a wildfire.

But recently scientists have begun to realize that some of these little ... Read More

In E. Coli Fight, Some Strains Are Largely Ignored

For nearly two decades, Public Enemy No. 1 for the food industry and its government regulators has been a virulent strain of E. coli bacteria that has killed hundreds of people, sickened thousands and prompted the recall of millions of pounds of hamburger, spinach and other foods.

But as eve... Read More

Eat bacteria to boost brain power

(note - this article comes from ASM's 2010 Public Communications Award winner Debora MacKenzie)

Could playing in the dirt make you smarter? Studies in mice suggest that it could.

Mice given peanut butter laced with a common, harmless soil bacterium ran through mazes twice as fast and enjoy... Read More

Jeffrey Fox of Microbe interviews Jian Ku Shang.

Jeffrey Fox of Microbe interviews Jian Ku Shang,materials scientist from the University of Illinois for the May 2010 issue.

























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Q and A: Could the Bacteria in Your Gut Predispose You to Obesity?

The search for factors contributing to obesity has turned inward — all the way to the middle of the gut, where as many as 100 trillion bacteria hang out. The mix of microbes in a given person’s innards may — emphasize “may” — play some role in determining his tendency to put on pounds by governi... Read More

Antibiotics useful for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease occasionally have flare-ups of their symptoms that require hospitalization. A study published Tuesday shows patients who received antibiotics within the first two days of hospitalization had better outcomes.

This is the second study in two da... Read More

Microbial Team May Be Culprit in Colony Collapse Disorder

New research from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) identifies a new potential cause for "Colony Collapse Disorder" in honeybees. A group of pathogens including a fungus and family of viruses may be working together to cause the decline. Scientists report their results May 25 at... Read More

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