Podcasts

MWVThumbVideoSmallWatch Latest Video Subscribe to Video Feed

ICAAC-Live-Banner

twiv_banner

twim_mwsite_badge

bacteriofilesbanner

isbadge

yellowstonelogo

Subscribe Learn More

mts_banner

This Week in Parasitism

a-radio

MicrobeWorld App

appsquarebannerad200x200

Microbes After Hours

MWbannerEbola

Click for more "Microbes After Hours" videos

Join MicrobeWorld

Subscribe via Email

subscribe

Featured Image

Featured Video

Ebola Virus explained

Supporters

ASM House 200X200

Getting Started with MicrobeWorld

More "How to" Videos:
| |
|

halorhodopsin microbial protein restores vision blind animals

Scientists from the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research (FMI)say they have restored vision in retinitis pigmentosa using an archaebacterial protein, halorhodopsin. Introducing light-sensitive halorhodopsin into the remaining but nonfunctional cone photoreceptors of the retina o... Read More

FDA Urges Limiting Antibiotics in Meat

The continued use of antimicrobial drugs to promote growth in chickens, cattle and other livestock is tied to antibiotic resistance and should be phased out for that purpose, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Monday.

The drugs in question include penicillin, tetracycline, macrolide... Read More

Reseachers predict larger-than-average Gulf 'dead zone'; impact of oil spill unclear

niversity of Michigan aquatic ecologist Donald Scavia and his colleagues say this year's Gulf of Mexico "dead zone" is expected to be larger than average, continuing a decades-long trend that threatens the health of a $659 million fishery.

The 2010 forecast, released today by the U.S. Nationa... Read More

Illinois Pumpkin Fields Face Cunning Opponent

Wet conditions have Illinois pumpkin growers on the alert for signs of Phytophthora blight in their fields. This disease nearly destroyed the pumpkin industry in 1999, causing up to 100 percent crop losses in parts of the state. While it's not a new disease to this industry, it is the most deva... Read More

Underwater sponges and worms may hold key to cure for malaria

Healing powers for one of the world's deadliest diseases may lie within sponges, sea worms and other underwater creatures.

University of Central Florida scientist Debopam Chakrabarti is analyzing more than 2,500 samples from marine organisms collected off deep sea near Florida's coast. Some o... Read More

Ever wondered why do people have bad breath in the morning?

It's a cozy Sunday morning as you sneak into your parents' bedroom for some snuggle time. You carefully slip between your mom and dad, feeling the warmth of their bodies. Then your mom turns over, smiles gently and pulls you close for a little kiss. However, instead of the inviting smell you nor... Read More

WSU breaks ground on school for global animal health building

Under a sunny sky, officials from Washington State University and the Gates Foundation broke ground on a 62,000-square-foot, three-story flagship research building for a new School for Global Animal Health. The first of its kind research facility will house a state-of-the-art infectious disease ... Read More

Microbe Colonies Show Sophisticated Learning Behaviors

Microbes may be smarter than we think, at least that's according to Princeton University researchers who have shown for the first time that bacteria don't just react to changes in their surroundings - they anticipate and prepare for them. The findings, reported in Science, challenge the prevaili... Read More

Virus plus gene mutation spurs Crohn's disease in mice

Mice with a gene variant linked to Crohn's disease only develop the inflammatory bowel disorder if they are infected by a common norovirus called MNV, finds a new study.
Read More

Blind mice see again

Researchers have restored sight to blind laboratory mice. Using a virus already approved for human gene therapy, the researchers inserted a gene from a light-sensitive bacterium, Natronomonas pharaonis, into cone-cell DNA. Read More

Scientists crack chemical code that controls bacterial swarms

Spanish researchers have discovered a key component of infectious bacteria's battle plan, identifying a protein that tells bacteria in a colony to halt their forward march when antibiotics are present, waiting until the coast is clear before resuming the infection.
Read More

TWiV 88 Letters

Sharon writes:


Hello fellow virus lovers,


I first want to comment about Vincent's pick of the week a few weeks back, the book "Polio" by David Oshinsky. I am currently studying poliovirus in Julie Pfeiffer's lab (as you revealed many moons ago with a previous ... Read More

TWiV 88: A bug fix, an AIDS treatment, and an undead retrovirus

Unable to embed Rapid1Pixelout audio player. Please double check that:  1)You have the latest version of Adobe Flash Player.  2)This web page does not have any fatal Javascript errors.  3)The audio-player.js file of Rapid1Pixelout has been included.

On episode #88 of the podcast This Week in Virology, Vincent, Alan, and Marc discuss using a virus for beetle control, RNA based gene therapy for AIDS, and reconstitution of a endogenous human retro... Read More

NASA's Des Marais Elected Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology

Cave exploring has its rewards. It led David Des Marais, a Chemistry major in college at the time, to pursue a career as a research scientist in astrobiology and space science
at NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif.

Des Marais explains that his interest in exploring caves in so... Read More

Free tests available during National HIV Testing Day

Health groups across the country are preparing for National HIV Testing Day this Sunday.

More than one million Americans are living with HIV, but one in five people don't even know they have it. That's why health officials say it's so important to get checked, and urge everyone to take an HIV... Read More

Bird flu: In the plumage the secret of virus spread success

International team of Italy-US scientists reports discovery of a new mechanism of avian influenza virus circulation and transmission in nature

A team of scientists, led by Mauro Delogu, virologist from the Veterinary Faculty of the Bologna University and researchers from the Istituto Superior... Read More

Soil-Borne Pathogens Drive Tree Diversity in Forests, Study Shows

What determines plant diversity in a forest? It's a question even Charles Darwin wanted to unravel. But most research into forest diversity demonstrates only patterns of species survival and abundance rather than the reason for them -- until now.

A team of researchers led by biologists at the... Read More

Companies Peddling Microbial Cures to Oil Spill Come Calling on Gulf Coast

Superbugs won't save the Gulf Coast. But that won't stop companies from selling them. As crude washes into marshes and beaches along the Gulf of Mexico, several small businesses have been barnstorming to sell local and state officials on what seems like a dream scenario. Douse the oil with our ... Read More

The Human Genome at 10: What It Did—and Didn’t—Deliver

Happy Birthday, human genome. On June 26, 2000 a group of scientists at the White House announced that they had a working draft of our genetic blueprints. They hadn’t sequenced all our genes; the Human Genome Project and its private-sector competitor Celera Genomics still had some gaps to fill i... Read More

Microbiota of the nose and throat: phylum-level similarities, species-level differences

There’s more than one way to skin a cat. The latest paper from mBio reveals that although the bacterial phyla in the nose and throat are somewhat consistent from person to person, the individual species vary a great deal, indicating there is more than one ideal community for these niches, and mo... Read More

American Society for Microbiology
2012 1752 N Street, N.W. • Washington, DC 20036-2904 • (202) 737-3600
American Society For Microbiology © 2014   |   Privacy Policy   |   Terms of Use