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Despite countless changes, original HIV infection lurks within

Scientists have been surprised to learn that, despite thousands of changes that viruses like HIV undergo in rapid fashion to evade the body's immune system, the original version that caused the infection is still present in the body months later.

The finding, published in the June issue of th... Read More

DOE drops $24 million to spur commercialization of algae-based biofuels

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today the investment of up to $24 million for three research groups to tackle key hurdles in the commercialization of algae-based biofuels. The selections will support the development of a clean, sustainable transportation sector—a goal of the Depart... Read More

Virus 'explorers' probe inner workings of the brain

Lynn Enquist, a professor in Princeton's Department of Molecular Biology and in the Princeton Neuroscience Institute, is leading an effort to use genetically engineered viruses as explorers that travel throughout the nervous system, tracing the connections between neurons and reporting on their ... Read More

The perils of summer

Summer means the arrival of certain illnesses and infections caused by bacteria, viruses and bugs that thrive in the warm, moist environment. Although the risk of catching these diseases is low, there are some precautions to take to stay healthy.

BACTERIA

Bacterial meningitis

• What it ... Read More

Curbing Domestic Violence Key to Reducing HIV Infection Among South African Women

Women in South Africa who are victims of domestic violence are more likely to become infected with HIV compared to women who do not experience such behavior, according to a study published June 16, 2010 in The Lancet'‘s Online First.

Nearly one in seven new HIV infections could be prevented i... Read More

Inspectors find safety flaws where airline food is prepared

Six months ago, Food and Drug Administration inspectors say, they found live roaches and dead roach carcasses "too numerous to count" inside the Denver facility of the world's largest airline caterer, LSG Sky Chefs.

They also reported finding ants, flies and debris, and employees handling foo... Read More

Biologically Inspired Technology Produces Sugar from Photosynthetic Bacteria

Researchers from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard and Harvard Medical School have engineered photosynthetic bacteria to produce simple sugars and lactic acid.

This innovation could lead to new, environmentally friendly methods for producing commodity chemic... Read More

Search expands in illegal sale of raw milk in Minnesota

State investigators searched a second Minnesota farm that may have illegally sold raw milk as health officials investigate an E. coli outbreak that sickened several people, officials confirmed Monday.

The state's investigation began after E. coli traced to unpasteurized milk products sickened... Read More

Scientists claim method to kill C diff bug found

Professor Colin Hill and Professor Paul Ross of UCC teamed up with scientists at the University of Alberta in Canada and with experts led by Mary Rea at the Teagasc Moorpark Food Research Centre to form the compound which they believe can eliminate the Clostridium difficile bug without harming o... Read More

FDA: Antibiotics in Livestock Affects Human Health

Giving animals antibiotics in order to increase food production is a threat to public health and should be stopped, the FDA said today.

The federal agency says it has the power to ban the practice, but it's starting by issuing "draft guidance" in hopes the food industry will make voluntary ch... Read More

Four Injured In Explosion On Mizzou Campus

Four people were injured when a 2,200-pound hydrogen tank exploded Monday afternoon on the University of Missouri campus.

Columbia Fire Capt. Eric Hartman said the people were working in the biochemistry lab on an experiment involving bacteria growth in hydrogen gas. He said they placed gas i... Read More

halorhodopsin microbial protein restores vision blind animals

Scientists from the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research (FMI)say they have restored vision in retinitis pigmentosa using an archaebacterial protein, halorhodopsin. Introducing light-sensitive halorhodopsin into the remaining but nonfunctional cone photoreceptors of the retina o... Read More

FDA Urges Limiting Antibiotics in Meat

The continued use of antimicrobial drugs to promote growth in chickens, cattle and other livestock is tied to antibiotic resistance and should be phased out for that purpose, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Monday.

The drugs in question include penicillin, tetracycline, macrolide... Read More

Reseachers predict larger-than-average Gulf 'dead zone'; impact of oil spill unclear

niversity of Michigan aquatic ecologist Donald Scavia and his colleagues say this year's Gulf of Mexico "dead zone" is expected to be larger than average, continuing a decades-long trend that threatens the health of a $659 million fishery.

The 2010 forecast, released today by the U.S. Nationa... Read More

Illinois Pumpkin Fields Face Cunning Opponent

Wet conditions have Illinois pumpkin growers on the alert for signs of Phytophthora blight in their fields. This disease nearly destroyed the pumpkin industry in 1999, causing up to 100 percent crop losses in parts of the state. While it's not a new disease to this industry, it is the most deva... Read More

Underwater sponges and worms may hold key to cure for malaria

Healing powers for one of the world's deadliest diseases may lie within sponges, sea worms and other underwater creatures.

University of Central Florida scientist Debopam Chakrabarti is analyzing more than 2,500 samples from marine organisms collected off deep sea near Florida's coast. Some o... Read More

Ever wondered why do people have bad breath in the morning?

It's a cozy Sunday morning as you sneak into your parents' bedroom for some snuggle time. You carefully slip between your mom and dad, feeling the warmth of their bodies. Then your mom turns over, smiles gently and pulls you close for a little kiss. However, instead of the inviting smell you nor... Read More

WSU breaks ground on school for global animal health building

Under a sunny sky, officials from Washington State University and the Gates Foundation broke ground on a 62,000-square-foot, three-story flagship research building for a new School for Global Animal Health. The first of its kind research facility will house a state-of-the-art infectious disease ... Read More

Microbe Colonies Show Sophisticated Learning Behaviors

Microbes may be smarter than we think, at least that's according to Princeton University researchers who have shown for the first time that bacteria don't just react to changes in their surroundings - they anticipate and prepare for them. The findings, reported in Science, challenge the prevaili... Read More

Virus plus gene mutation spurs Crohn's disease in mice

Mice with a gene variant linked to Crohn's disease only develop the inflammatory bowel disorder if they are infected by a common norovirus called MNV, finds a new study.
Read More

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