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'Natural' Nitrogen-fixing Bacteria Protect Soybeans From Aphids

An invasion of soybean aphids poses a problem for soybean farmers requiring application of pesticides, but a team of Penn State entomologists thinks a careful choice of nitrogen-fixing bacteria may provide protection against the sucking insects. Soybeans are legumes, plants that can have a symbi... Read More

Vinegar may aid in groundwater cleanup

A University of Leeds research team found adding dilute acetic acid - vinegar - to groundwater sites contaminated with harmful chromium compounds boosts the growth of naturally-occurring bacteria by providing an attractive food source. This is turn halps the bacteria to biodegrade the harmful co... Read More

Bill on drug-resistant infections advances in Washington state

A bill in Washington State's legislature designed to cut the spread of drug-resistant staph infections passed the Senate Monday. It requires health professionals to note on death certificates when the deadly bacteria played a role in a patient's demise. The bill is designed to aid the state in m... Read More

Bacteria protect soybeans from aphids

U.S. entomologists claim a careful choice of nitrogen-fixing bacteria might provide soybean farmers protection against an invasion of soybean aphids.

"Our results demonstrate that plant-rhizobia interactions influence plant resistance to insect herbivores and that some rhizobia strains confer... Read More

Gene Targeting Discovery Opens Door For Vaccines And Drugs

In a genetic leap that could help fast track vaccine and drug development to prevent or tame serious global diseases, DMS researchers have discovered how to destroy a key DNA pathway in a wily and widespread human parasite. The feat surmounts a major hurdle for targeting genes in Toxoplasma gond... Read More

Cure For Honey Bee Colony Collapse?

For the first time, scientists have isolated the parasite Nosema ceranae (Microsporidia) from professional apiaries suffering from honey bee colony depopulation syndrome. They then went on to treat the infection with complete success. In a study published in the new journal from the Society for ... Read More

Fracas Erupts Over Climate Change and Potential for Disease Spread

A fray has broken out among ecologists over a study suggesting that climate change might not spread tropical diseases far and wide after all. When the paper triggered an uproar, editors at the journal Ecology decided to publish not one but six responses alongside the original research. The colle... Read More

In Georgia, Rain Increases the Risks of Salmonella in Waterways

Researchers at the University of Georgia in Athens (U.G.A.) have found that rain ups the risk of salmonella in rivers and streams—and, in turn, in products nourished by and washed in tainted runoff waters. The scientists report in Applied and Environmental Microbiology that 79 percent of water s... Read More

Foodborne illnesses hold steady in U.S.

Cases of food-borne illnesses, including infections such as salmonella and Escherichia coli that have been at the center of recent outbreaks, have held steady for the past four years, federal health officials said today. The good news is that this is after several years of falling case numbers. Read More

Long-term care facilities harbor reservoirs of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria

The prevalence of a certain form of drug-resistant bacteria, called multidrug-resistant gram-negative (MDRGN) organisms, far surpassed that of two other common antimicrobial-resistant infections in long-term care facilities, according to a study conducted by researchers at Hebrew SeniorLife's In... Read More

Evolutionary theory may help to fight a fatal disease

LIKE many other activities, global health has fashions. For the past couple of decades AIDS has captured both the imagination and the research dollars. Recently, though, the focus has shifted towards malaria, which kills a million people a year, most of them children, and debilitates hundreds of... Read More

Salmonella peanut company hit with huge fine

The company whose salmonella-tainted peanut products made 691 people sick and may have killed nine others has been fined $14.6 million.

The Texas Department of State Health Services yesterday fined Plainview Peanut Corp. — a plant owned by the Peanut Corporation of America (PCA), the company ... Read More

Novel Method Predicts Impact Of A Covert Anthrax Release

A new statistical method that can estimate the origin and time of an aerosolized release of the pathogen causing anthrax, following detection of the first few cases has been developed by researchers from the Medical Research Council (MRC) Centre for Outbreak Analysis and Modelling at Imperial Co... Read More

MTS23 - Jo Handelsman - The Science of Bug Guts

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Smoking HIV Meds to Get High?!?! What will the Kids Think of Next?

This is crazy. People South Africa have found a new use for efavirenz , an antiretroviral drug that prevents HIV from making copies of itself in the body, by crushing it up and smoking it to get high. "When taken as prescribed, efavirenz can cause side effects, including drowsiness and vivid, co... Read More

PEPFAR Efforts May Prevent Death from AIDS, But Hasn't Halted Spread of HIV

According to an evaluation study of the The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief in Africa released in the May 19, 2009 edition of the Annals of Medicine, the difference in the annual change in the number of HIV-related deaths was 10.5% lower in the focus countries than the control countr... Read More

Easter Chocolate in Peril!!!

The Easter bunny may not be bringing chocolate to the tots this year according to an article in the New Scientist that say a viral infection is impacting cacao trees on the Ivory Coast and a fungal infection called Witches Broom is doing the same for the cacao tree in Brazil. Thumbnail by Lexng... Read More

Researchers Believe HIV is Becoming more Virulent

A press release from the Infectious Disease Society states "damage to patients’ immune systems is happening sooner now than it did at the beginning of the HIV epidemic, suggesting the virus has become more virulent," according to a new study in the May 1, 2009 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseas... Read More

Ebola accident puts vaccine to the test

Did an experimental vaccine save a scientist in Germany from Ebola? The lives of others who work with the deadly virus might ride on the answer. On 12 March a woman working at the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine (BNI) in Hamburg accidentally pricked her finger with a needle carryi... Read More

Spring Fishing Season Arrives... And With It, Amphibian Diseases

Waterdogs, they're called, these larvae of tiger salamanders used as live bait for freshwater fishing. With tiger salamander larvae, anglers hope to catch largemouth bass, channel catfish and other freshwater fishes. They may be in for more than they bargained for: salamanders in bait shops in A... Read More

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