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Touch Surfaces and how microbes spread

With the advent of the rapid spread of H1N1 it is often a challenge to explain the need to be vigilant about hand hygiene. CNN's Randi Kaye reporting on Anderson Cooper 360 reports on how germs from one sneeze can spread to hundreds, maybe thousands. The video has a great animation and illustr... Read More

Swine flu virus starting to look less threatening

The swine flu virus that has frightened the world is beginning to look a little less ominous. New York City officials reported Friday that the swine flu still has not spread beyond a few schools. In Mexico, very few relatives of flu victims seem to have caught the virus.

One flu expert says t... Read More

American Society for Microbiology Emphasizes Hand Hygiene As Flu Protective Measure

As H1N1 influenza A (swine flu) spreads, keeping hands clean is one of the most important ways to prevent infection and illness. “Frequent handwashing is probably the single most effective and simplest intervention you can do to protect yourself and your family,” according to Dr. Judy Daly, spok... Read More

THE NUCLEOTIDAL WAVE - The Front Line of Mutant Food

For 50 bucks an hour, the UC Davis Plant Transformation Facility, one of the premier genetic-modification labs in the US, will offer its services to anyone with a dish of DNA, a vegetable, and a mutated dream. It is a place where ordinary supermarket fruits and vegetables are converted into new ... Read More

What If Scientists Didn’t Compete?

What if scientists, instead of rushing to publish or perish, chose to cooperate? Sean Cutler decided to do “a little experiment,” as he calls it, and you can see the results in the forthcoming issue of Science.

The journal carries an article by Dr. Cutler and 20 other researchers in the Unite... Read More

Sponge larvae: Your unlikely ancestors

Precambrian. About 700 million years ago, one of the most significant - and most mysterious - events in the history of life on Earth occurred. Suddenly, there was more to life than just single-celled microbes. Within a few tens of millions of years, an extraordinary array of large animals appear... Read More

Report Says Bank’s AIDS Efforts Are Failing

A vast majority of the World Bank’s projects to combat AIDS failed to perform satisfactorily over the past decade, with the ones in Africa, the region at the epicenter of the pandemic, registering the worst record, according to a new internal evaluation.

Seven of 10 AIDS projects that the ban... Read More

Virus’s Tangled Genes Straddle Continents, Raising a Mystery About Its Origins

The flu that is moving through humans appears to have a combination of genes from two normally separate sets of pigs, those from the Americas and from Eurasia, scientists say.

However, it is unknown how those pigs met, and there is not yet any genetic proof that this particular flu was ever i... Read More

W.H.O. Gives Virus a Name That’s More Scientific and Less Loaded

On Wednesday, the new disease affecting thousands of people in Mexico and more than 100 in the United States and other countries was called swine influenza. By Thursday, the “S word” had been banned: A sentence in a box at the very top of the home page of the World Health Organization said, “Fro... Read More

Multi-drug strategy could slow pandemic spread

How individual countries deploy their flu drugs may be key to determining the size of any pandemic that emerges from the current H1N1 outbreak. That's the conclusion of a mathematical model of flu transmission by an international team of researchers.

The findings also suggest that countries ... Read More

First Flu Death Provides Clues to Mexico Toll

Adela María Gutiérrez fell ill in the beginning of April with what she thought was a bad cold. She tried aspirin and antibiotics, bed rest and moist towels, but nothing brought down her soaring fever, reduced her aches and pains, or boosted her energy level.

It would be more than a week befo... Read More

Study: DNA damage does not kill bacteria

U.S. scientists say they've determined immune cells don't kill bacteria by damaging their DNA, reversing a widespread assumption in the scientific community.

The University of Illinois researchers said they discovered macrophages -- the immune cells that engulf and kill bacteria -- direct the... Read More

Dr. Michael Schmidt from MUSC on Swine Flu

MUSC clinicians and researchers are actively monitoring the swine flu epidemic, linking their efforts to others at a state and national level. While concerned, we are prepared to respond to cases arising in the local area.

{mp3remote}http://medicaluniversc.http.internapcdn.net/medicalunivers... Read More

UCLA Researchers Develop New Method to Induce Immunity Against STDs

Researchers at the California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI) at UCLA and the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA have now designed a unique method for inducing immunity to the infection. The findings could accelerate progress toward the development of a vaccine against Chlamydia trachomatis in... Read More

Mexico's Government Closes Doors May 1-5

From the Washington Post: "Health Secretary Jose Cordova says nonessential federal government offices will be closed from May 1-5. He said all nonessential private businesses must also close for that period but essential services like transport, supermarkets, trash collection, hospital will rema... Read More

Aporkalypse Now!

This blog post culls together a bunch of interesting articles on how swine flu has impacted the pork industry, the media, new media & more. Read More

NASA micro-satellite eyes space bacteria

NASA is preparing to launch a tiny satellite loaded with yeast and anti-fungal drugs early next month in order to better understand how bacteria becomes nastier in space.

The nanosatellite, known as PharmaSat, is only about the size of a loaf of bread and will hitch a ride as a secondary payl... Read More

Containing Flu Is Not Feasible, Specialists Say

“Containment is no longer a feasible option,” Dr. Keiji Fukuda, deputy director general of the World Health Organization, announced Monday night in Geneva after a meeting of the agency’s emergency committee on the spreading swine flu virus. “The world should focus on mitigation. We recommend not... Read More

Matrix Protein Key To Fighting Viruses

Researchers from Durham University’s Centre for Bioactive Chemistry are developing methods that show how proteins interact with cell membranes when a virus strikes. Using their approach, the team hopes to find new ways to disrupt and disarm ‘enveloped viruses’ before they spread in our bodies.
... Read More

Outbreak focuses attention on flu treatments

There is no vaccine for the current strain of swine flu - at least not yet. However, federal health authorities said two antiviral drugs, Tamiflu and Relenza, may play a key role in the response to the outbreak because they are in wide supply and, based on laboratory tests, appear to be effectiv... Read More

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