Podcasts

mwv89thumbWatch Latest Video Subscribe to Video Feed

ICAAC-Live-Banner

twiv_banner

twim_mwsite_badge

bacteriofilesbanner

isbadge

yellowstonelogo

Subscribe Learn More

mts_banner

This Week in Parasitism

a-radio

MicrobeWorld App

appsquarebannerad200x200

Microbes After Hours

WaterSupplyYouTubeFrame

Click for more "Microbes After Hours" videos

Join MicrobeWorld

Subscribe via Email

subscribe

Featured Image

Featured Video

Ebola Virus explained

Supporters

ASM House 200X200

Getting Started with MicrobeWorld

More "How to" Videos:
| |
|

MTS38 - Jonathan Eisen - An Embarrassment of Genomes

Unable to embed Rapid1Pixelout audio player. Please double check that:  1)You have the latest version of Adobe Flash Player.  2)This web page does not have any fatal Javascript errors.  3)The audio-player.js file of Rapid1Pixelout has been included.


Read More

BGI-Led Team Sequences Cucumber Genome

An international research team led by investigators at the Beijing Genomics Institute-Shenzhen reported online in Nature Genetics yesterday that they have sequenced the draft genome of the domestic cucumber plant, Cucumis sativus.

The team used a combination of Sanger and Illumina methods to ... Read More

Why fat angers the immune system

Overweight people get heart disease and diabetes – and more severe swine flu – because their fat triggers inflammation, an immune response meant to fight infection. Now the protein responsible for this sequence of events may have been found.

Jerrold Olefsky and colleagues at the University of... Read More

Theme Parks Confront Flu Jitters

For many Americans, the fear of swine flu has made everyday acts like going to work, going to school or getting on a plane feel fraught with danger — even more so since President Obama recently declared swine flu a national emergency.

Now, even Mickey Mouse is being looked at with suspicion.
... Read More

A Genetically Engineered Rainbow of Bacteria

Bioengineering students from around the world converged on MIT this weekend in what has become an annual ritual in synthetic biology--iGEM, the international genetically engineered machines competition. Among the finalists this year were "GluColi", a new generation of glue made by bacteria, a bi... Read More

Bacteria 'Invest' Wisely To Survive Uncertain Times, Scientists Report

Like savvy Wall Street money managers, bacteria hedge their bets to increase their chances of survival in uncertain times, strategically investing their biological resources to weather unpredictable environments.

In a new study available online and featured on the cover of today's issue of Ce... Read More

The Entwined Destinies Of Humankind And Leprosy Bacteria

For thousands of years an undesirable and persistent companion has been travelling with man wherever he goes. Mycobacterium leprae, the bacterium that causes leprosy, has only one known natural host -- humankind. And because of man's many travels, this bacillus has colonized the entire earth. It... Read More

Upcoming Fall ASM Teleconferences

ASM's Fall Teleconferences Program will keep you current about the developments in your field.

Without ever leaving your laboratory or office, you can learn from expert scientists and key decision-makers hundreds of miles away. Each teleconference is an interactive live broadcast i... Read More

Mining for Algae: Could Abandoned Mines Help Grow Biofuel?

Backers of algae-based biofuels tout the simplicity of their feedstock. Sunlight and water are all that's needed to convert carbon dioxide into fuel.

Now, some scientists are testing the notion that sunlight might be optional.

Researchers at the Missouri University of Science and Technolog... Read More

Could We Be On the Verge of a New Drug to Treat Lupus?

Systemic lupus is the most common form of the autoimmune disease, lupus, which afflicts about 5 million people worldwide and causes a slew of symptoms including fever, pain and swelling. Now, sufferers of systemic lupus may be closer to a new drug to treat their symptoms, according to the result... Read More

Is There a Case of the Flu in Your Future?

Imagine that a simple test could tell whether you were going to come down with the flu or a cold even before you get hit by a sore throat, runny nose or fever.

Scientists at Duke University here and at other research centers have been working to develop such a predictive test by delving deep ... Read More

Bacteria 'Launch A Shield' To Resist Attack

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen and the Technical University of Denmark along with other collaborators in Denmark and the US found that the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa can 'switch on' production of molecules that kill white blood cells -- preventing the bacteria being eliminat... Read More

Hand Sanitizers: What You Don't Know

"We all know that having clean hands is one way to prevent seasonal cold and flu viruses, including H1N1 swine flu. But should you wash with soap and water, or coat your hands with disinfecting gel from one of those dispensers that seem to be appearing in more and more restrooms, offices, hallwa... Read More

'Stormy' the ferret dies from H1N1 infection in Nebraska

A news station in Hastings, Nebraska (KHAS) has reported that Stormy the ferret, one of four ferrets in a family of humans sick with the flu, has died from the H1N1 virus.

Ferrets have respiratory systems similar to humans and are known to be susceptible to human flu viruses.

{flvremote}h... Read More

FDA to ban sale of raw oysters from Gulf of Mexico

"Federal officials plan to ban sales of raw oysters harvested from the Gulf of Mexico unless the shellfish are treated to destroy potentially deadly bacteria _ a requirement that opponents say could deprive diners of a delicacy cherished for generations.

The plan has also raised concern among... Read More

When science is lacking, good leadership is critical

Laura Kahn, research scholar at Princeton University's Program on Science and Global Security, has written a column on how leaders' decisions on infectious disease policy can impact world health for better or worse.

"Since the middle of the twentieth century, more than 330 novel infectious d... Read More

CDC: Contaminated beef may be linked to 2 deaths

"Two deaths and 26 other illnesses may be linked to fresh ground beef that has been recalled because it might be contaminated with E. coli bacteria, a federal health official said Monday.

One of the deaths involved a New York adult with several underlying health conditions, said Lola Scott Ru... Read More

A MRSA strain five times more lethal than other strains

A strain of MRSA that causes bloodstream infections is five times more lethal than other strains and has shown to have some resistance to the potent antibiotic drug vancomycin used to treat MRSA, according to a Henry Ford Hospital study.

The study found that 50 percent of the patients infecte... Read More

Critics blast Kellogg's claim that cereals can boost immunity

Kellogg, the nation's largest cereal maker, is being called to task by critics who object to the swine flu-conscious claim now bannered in bold lettering on the front of Cocoa Krispies cereal boxes: "Now helps support your child's IMMUNITY."

Of all claims on cereal boxes, "this one belongs in... Read More

P. aeruginosa and its antibiotic and host immune response shield

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen and the Technical University of Denmark along with other collaborators in Denmark and the US found that the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa can 'switch on' production of molecules that kill white blood cells – preventing the bacteria being eliminate... Read More

American Society for Microbiology
2012 1752 N Street, N.W. • Washington, DC 20036-2904 • (202) 737-3600
American Society For Microbiology © 2014   |   Privacy Policy   |   Terms of Use