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Soda fountain machines could make you sick,

"Drinking a beverage from a restaurant's soda fountain machine could make you sick, claims a research team at Hollins University.

Water, Coke, Pepsi and these soda's diet versions, when dispensed through fountain machines, contained bacteria that have the potential to cause gastrointestinal i... Read More

The WHO says swine flu pandemic is milder than expected, may be nearing peak

The outbreak of pandemic H1N1 influenza appears to be waning in the United States and Canada and may be nearing a peak in the rest of the world, but it is impossible to predict what will happen with influenza viruses, the World Health Organization said today. "It's too early to say whether activ... Read More

Stopping MRSA before it becomes virulent now possible

Methicillin-resistant Staphyloccocus aureus (MRSA) is a bacterium that is responsible for many hard-to-treat infections. MRSA bacteria are by definition any strain of S. aureas resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics, such as methicillin and dicloxacillin.

Most scientists believe that staph infe... Read More

China protects pandas from possible H1N1 pandemic

Cats can get the H1N1 virus. So can dogs, ferrets and (obviously) pigs. But what about endangered species like giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)?

China isn't waiting around for an answer. Last week, the panda section of the Shaanxi Wild Animal Rescue and Research Center was closed to visi... Read More

Computer model reveals where food pathogens grow

An outbreak of food-related illness, such as E. coli-tainted spinach, often leaves food safety experts scratching their heads over the source of the contamination.

Thanks to a new computer model developed by researchers at the University of Florida, Wageningen University and the University of... Read More

Newly Explored Bacteria Reveal Some Huge RNA Surprises

Yale University researchers have found very large RNA structures within previously unstudied bacteria that appear crucial to basic biological functions such as helping viruses infect cells or allowing genes to "jump" to different parts of the chromosome.

These exceptionally large RNA molecule... Read More

Jekyll-and-Hyde factor makes marine bacteria cause 'coral bleaching'

Scientists are reporting the first identification of substances involved in the Jekyll-and-Hyde transformation that changes harmless marine bacteria into killers that cause "coral bleaching."

Researcher Dan Bearden and colleagues note that bleaching already has destroyed up to 30 percent of t... Read More

'Ich' Discovery Could Yield New Ways to Treat Devastating Freshwater Fish Parasite

Researchers from the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine have made an "unexpected" dual discovery that could open new avenues for treating Ichthyophthirius multifiliis, or "Ich," a devastating single-celled protozoan parasite that commonly attacks freshwater fish.

With the ai... Read More

13 New Stem Cell Lines Open to Research

The National Institutes of Health said Wednesday that it had approved 13 new human embryonic stem cell lines for use by federally financed researchers, with another 96 lines under review.

The action followed President Obama’s decision in March to expand the number of such cell lines beyond th... Read More

Symbiosis: Bacterial Gut Symbionts Are Tightly Linked With the Evolution of Herbivory in Ants

Multiple independent associations between rhizobiales and herbivorous ants provides strong evidence that symbiotic bacteria have facilitated the evolution of nectar and exudate-feeding life histories in ants and their radiation into otherwise inhospitable rainforest canopy habitats, providing a ... Read More

Nasa: compelling evidence of life on Mars

(editor's note - this is an update to a story we featured at http://www.microbeworld.org/index.php?option=com_jlibrary&view=article&id=2038)

A research team at Johnson Space Centre in Houston has been re-examining a meteorite that hit Antarctica 13,000 years ago, and found the most compelling... Read More

WHO's New Guidelines on HIV Care Call for Earlier Treatment

The World Health Organization is now advising health care professionals to start patients with HIV on antiretroviral drugs earlier in the course of their infection, as part of new agency guidelines announced Monday.

The new recommendations will likely result in more patients worldwide obtaini... Read More

Will Copper Keep Us Safe from the Superbugs?

Three papers scheduled for publication in the January issue of the Journal of Hospital Infection suggest that copper might have a role in the fight against healthcare-associated infections.

In a busy Birmingham teaching hospital, researchers swapped a conventional toilet seat, tap-handles and... Read More

Researchers Track Hammerhead Shark Fins To Source Using DNA Barcodes

For the first time, DNA tools have successfully pinpointed the geographic origin of shark fins sold dried in markets to satisfy the demand for shark fin soup, a Chinese delicacy.

Using CSI-like genetic methods, scientists have traced scalloped hammerhead shark fins from a burgeoning Hong Kong... Read More

Fall Wave of Swine Flu Has Peaked, Data Confirm

New swine flu infections continue to drop across the United States, confirmation that the pandemic’s fall wave has peaked, according to figures posted online Monday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

But the number of children and teenagers killed by swine flu is still rising.... Read More

Study pits bacteria against salmonella in tomatoes

Federal food safety scientists are waging biological warfare to combat salmonella in tomatoes.

Scientists with the Food and Drug Administration's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition are studying naturally occurring bacteria that can fight the bacteria that causes salmonella and to ke... Read More

Molecular Architecture of Treponema Pallidum, Bacterium That Causes Syphilis

A team of scientists from The Forsyth Institute, the University of Connecticut Health Center, the CDC and the Wadsworth Center, have used state-of-the-art technology to elucidate the molecular architecture of Treponema pallidum, the bacterium which causes syphilis. The previously unknown detaile... Read More

Evolutionary Arms Race Between Bacteria and Their Viruses in Soil

Viruses of soil bacteria (phages) evolve to improve their ability to infect the bacterial hosts that surround them. This is shown in a new study by Dutch researcher Michiel Vos, published in the journal Science. Phages appear to be better able to infect bacteria from the same small soil sample t... Read More

One Microbe as a Group of 200 Protein Machines

Molecular biology for years meant breaking down living cells to their smallest component parts, the genes and proteins that govern what a cell does. But a list of parts tells only so much. To understand how living cells really work, biologists are now trying to visualize how the parts are assemb... Read More

Salmonella: Drug-Resistant Strain of Bacteria Gains in Africa, With High Death Rates

A new drug-resistant strain of bacteria has emerged in the last decade in Africa and is causing unusual numbers of deaths there, British and African researchers said on Monday.

The strain, a variant of Salmonella typhimurium, is named ST313. Its genome was decoded by researchers from the Wel... Read More

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