Podcasts

TWiV ASV 2014-157x88Watch Latest Video Subscribe to Video Feed

ICAAC-Live-Banner

twiv_banner

twim_mwsite_badge

bacteriofilesbanner

isbadge

yellowstonelogo

Subscribe Learn More

mts_banner

This Week in Parasitism

a-radio

MicrobeWorld App

appsquarebannerad200x200

Join MicrobeWorld

Subscribe via Email

subscribe

Microbes After Hours

MW-Site-Banner-200x200

Click for more "Microbes After Hours" videos

Featured Image

Featured Video

Crowdsourced Microbes Heading to Station

Supporters

ASM House 200X200

Getting Started with MicrobeWorld

More "How to" Videos:
| |
|

Bacterial antibiotic resistance genes discovered

Antibacterial soap, hand sanitizer and antibiotics are all substances that we use in an attempt to kill bacteria that might make us sick.Whether we are concerned about getting strep throat, bacterial meningitis or something else, these prevention methods can offer protection.

However, some ba... Read More

How Bacteria Get Past Our Defenses

Mucus is more than gross--it's a critical barrier against disease, trapping many of the germs that want to invade your body. A wet mesh of proteins, antiseptic enzymes and salts, mucus is what keeps all but a few microbes from wreaking havoc on many of our most exposed tissues.

Helicobacter p... Read More

Survey of Academic Life Scientists Suggests 10-Year Drop in Industry Funding

Direct industry funding for academic life science research appears to have decreased in the last decade, according to the results of a 2007 survey published this week.

The survey also found that academic life scientists with industry support withheld data or delayed publication due to commerc... Read More

Plants and Bacteria 'Talk' to Thwart Disease

In plant and animal innate immunity, like many of the dances of life, it takes two to tango. A receptor molecule in the plant pairs up with a specific molecule on the invading bacteria and, presto, the immune system swings into action to defend against the invasion of the disease-causing microbe... Read More

Human microbes are picky about neighbourhoods on body

Your body is home to 10 times as many microbes as its own cells. But they can be quite picky about where they will settle – and what other bacteria they'll share fences with.

That's the conclusion of the most comprehensive map ever of the microbial communities flourishing in the human body.
... Read More

Can Pets Get Swine Flu?

A short Q&A session that regularly runs in the New York Times. This week, pets and H1N1 are discussed by Dr. Louise Murray, director of medicine at the A.S.P.C.A. Bergh Memorial Animal Hospital in New York City. Read More

Bacteria mix it up at the microscopic level

Many hands—or many flagella—make light work.

In studies of the motion of tiny swimming bacteria, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory found that the microscopic organisms can stir fluids remarkably quickly and effectively. As a result, the bacterial flagel... Read More

Flu outrunning vaccine, experts say

H1N1 in the news. Read More

Cat 'doing well' after world-first swine flu case

Vets in the US state of Iowa said a household cat had tested positive for swine flu - the first known case in the world of the new pandemic strain spreading to the feline population.

The domestic shorthair, a 13-year-old castrated male, apparently caught A(H1N1) off its owners - two of the th... Read More

Home Researchers study bacteria’s use in solar energy

n the future, bacteria could harness solar energy to provide power for automobiles if an ASU project recently granted $5.2 million by the U.S. Department of Energy succeeds.

A program in the energy department chose only 37 of 3,500 initial applicants to receive grants.

ASU professor Willem... Read More

Restarting Regeneration One Step at a Time

Planarians may be lowly flatworms, but the tiny crawlers possess powers that even superheroes would envy. Cut off the worm’s head or tail, and a new one sprouts to replace it. In the flatworm’s body, nerves, muscles, connective tissues, and whole organs regenerate when damaged or removed.

“T... Read More

MTS38 - Jonathan Eisen - An Embarrassment of Genomes



Read More

BGI-Led Team Sequences Cucumber Genome

An international research team led by investigators at the Beijing Genomics Institute-Shenzhen reported online in Nature Genetics yesterday that they have sequenced the draft genome of the domestic cucumber plant, Cucumis sativus.

The team used a combination of Sanger and Illumina methods to ... Read More

Why fat angers the immune system

Overweight people get heart disease and diabetes – and more severe swine flu – because their fat triggers inflammation, an immune response meant to fight infection. Now the protein responsible for this sequence of events may have been found.

Jerrold Olefsky and colleagues at the University of... Read More

Theme Parks Confront Flu Jitters

For many Americans, the fear of swine flu has made everyday acts like going to work, going to school or getting on a plane feel fraught with danger — even more so since President Obama recently declared swine flu a national emergency.

Now, even Mickey Mouse is being looked at with suspicion.
... Read More

A Genetically Engineered Rainbow of Bacteria

Bioengineering students from around the world converged on MIT this weekend in what has become an annual ritual in synthetic biology--iGEM, the international genetically engineered machines competition. Among the finalists this year were "GluColi", a new generation of glue made by bacteria, a bi... Read More

Bacteria 'Invest' Wisely To Survive Uncertain Times, Scientists Report

Like savvy Wall Street money managers, bacteria hedge their bets to increase their chances of survival in uncertain times, strategically investing their biological resources to weather unpredictable environments.

In a new study available online and featured on the cover of today's issue of Ce... Read More

The Entwined Destinies Of Humankind And Leprosy Bacteria

For thousands of years an undesirable and persistent companion has been travelling with man wherever he goes. Mycobacterium leprae, the bacterium that causes leprosy, has only one known natural host -- humankind. And because of man's many travels, this bacillus has colonized the entire earth. It... Read More

Upcoming Fall ASM Teleconferences

ASM's Fall Teleconferences Program will keep you current about the developments in your field.

Without ever leaving your laboratory or office, you can learn from expert scientists and key decision-makers hundreds of miles away. Each teleconference is an interactive live broadcast i... Read More

Mining for Algae: Could Abandoned Mines Help Grow Biofuel?

Backers of algae-based biofuels tout the simplicity of their feedstock. Sunlight and water are all that's needed to convert carbon dioxide into fuel.

Now, some scientists are testing the notion that sunlight might be optional.

Researchers at the Missouri University of Science and Technolog... Read More

American Society for Microbiology
2012 1752 N Street, N.W. • Washington, DC 20036-2904 • (202) 737-3600
American Society For Microbiology © 2014   |   Privacy Policy   |   Terms of Use