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Oral Bacteria Linked to Intrauterine Infections and Pre-term Birth

Bacteria in the mouths of pregnant women can contribute to pre-term birth according to researchs from Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, and Hathaway Brown School, Shaker Heights. The findings are published in the April 2010 issue of the journal Infection and Immunity. Read More

Microbes set on a mission to fight groundwater pollution

In most people's minds, microbes and drinking water don't go well together. Think cholera, or typhoid — serious diseases caused by waterborne bacteria. But research at Idaho National Laboratory is showcasing the potential of microbes to cleanse our water rather than foul it.

For the past deca... Read More

What does Harley Davidson and Lactococcus lactis have in common?

Harley-Davidson motorcycles and the bacterium that converts milk into cheese are slated to be honored by the Wisconsin state Assembly. Read More

HAART has potential to diminish mother-to-child HIV transmission in cost-effective manner

A new paper publish in PLoS One concludes that programs that optimize adherence to highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) through direct observation in pregnancy have the potential to diminish mother-to-child HIV transmission in a highly cost-effective manner. Read More

Could a plant virus have found a way to infect humans?

It has always been assumed that plant viruses cannot infect animals, and vice versa, but plant viruses are known to be abundant in human faeces.

Now Didier Raoult at the University of the Mediterranean in Marseille, France, and his team think a pepper virus is making people sick, too.

They... Read More

Did seasonal flu vaccination increase the risk of infection with pandemic H1N1 flu?

In September 2009, news stories reported that researchers in Canada had found an increased risk of pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza in people who had previously been vaccinated against seasonal influenza. Their research, consisting of four different studies, has now undergone further scientific p... Read More

Tapeworm brain infections on the increase in Mexico

Tapeworm infections of the brain, which can cause epileptic seizures, appear to be increasing in Mexico and bordering southwestern states, Loyola University Health System researchers report.

In Mexico, up to 10 percent of the population may have the infection, neurocysticercosis. While many p... Read More

Guillain-Barré Syndrome cases low after 2009 H1N1 vaccine

A new study finds that reports of a neurologic disease called Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) have been low after 2009 H1N1 vaccination, according to a research study that will be presented as part of the late-breaking science program at the American Academy of Neurology's 62nd Annual Meeting in T... Read More

Scientists hope to harness parasitic worms' immune-regulating effects.

"As blossoming spring trees spew pollen, many allergy sufferers would be grateful for a more effective way to alleviate their itchy misery. How about swallowing a batch of pig whipworm eggs, or deliberately infecting oneself with the fecal-dwelling hookworm? Yucky as these options sound, mountin... Read More

'Black Box' Plankton Found to Have Huge Role in Ocean Carbon Fixation

Blue-green algae, or cyanobacteria, grow in vast numbers in the sunlit surface waters of the oceans, the photic zone. They use sunlight to 'fix' carbon by converting carbon dioxide into sugars and other organic compounds through photosynthesis.

Cyanobacteria belong to the 'picophytoplankton',... Read More

More good news from the world of dog saliva

Fetching our newspaper & slippers, guarding the homestead from intruders, alerting us that Timmy has fallen into the old well - and now this. if we could determine which of our cave-person ancestors had the brilliant notion to domesticate these critters, that knuckle-dragger deserves an award f... Read More

A Campaign Shows Signs of Progress Against Polio

A decade after the world’s original deadline for eradicating polio, the most tenacious bastions of the crippling virus — Nigeria and India — have recently shown remarkable progress in halting its spread, giving even some of the antipolio campaign’s severest doubters hope that it may yet largel... Read More

Health worries over antibacterial soap additive

The safety of antimicrobial soaps and toothpastes is under review following concerns that they could interfere with hormones in the body.

Last week, the US Food and Drug Administration said it will re-evaluate the safety of triclosan, which is added to plastics, soaps and toothpastes to kill ... Read More

Bushmeat Presents Latest Food Scare

Researchers testing bushmeat smuggled into the U.S. have found strains of a virus in the same family as HIV, according to preliminary findings to be released Wednesday.

For years, authorities have tried to crack down on the smuggling of meat from certain animals, such as bats, monkeys and rod... Read More

Schabaker: Bioterror sleuth

Biochemist Daniel Schabacker of DOE's Argonne National Laboratory could be considered a Sherlock Holmes of bioterrorism. Although he doesn’t carry around a pipe and magnifying glass as he attempts to nab the culprit, he has a far more powerful deductive tool: the biochip.
The biochip offers Sch... Read More

Heel-stick test not good for identifying cytomegalovirus in newborns, study says

The heel-stick test commonly used for screening newborns for a variety of genetic disorders is not a good way to test for cytomegalovirus infections, the most common nongenetic cause of hearing loss, researchers reported Tuesday. About 20,000 to 30,000 infants in the U.S. are born with cytomegal... Read More

Bacterial Cells Engineered to Blink in Synch

Fluorescence-tagged Escherichia coli cells can be made to "blink" in unison by means of a constructed network of genes and proteins that coordinates oscillations within the growing cell population, according to Jeff Hasty and colleagues from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) in La J... Read More

Bad company: Mixed Infections of Cryptococcus neoformans

Bad company: Cryptococcus neoformans is responsible for an estimated 1 million cases of cryptococcal disease every year, predominantly meningoencephalitis. These cases are often fatal. So, what’s worse than an infection with one kind of Cryptococcus? A new paper selected for the inaugural iss... Read More

New online map can forecast the location and intensity of global disease outbreaks

A new online global map could soon help scientists better track and predict outbreaks of infectious diseases like H1N1 much the same way meteorologists can study and forecast the weather. The "Supramap" application illustrates the spread of pathogens and key mutations across time, space and vari... Read More

Facebook for Scientists

Indiana University has received more than $1.8 million from the National Institutes of Health to collaborate on a $12.2 million, seven-university project designed to network researchers around the country.

While the proposed new networking system will contain authentication mechanisms to prot... Read More

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