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A Non-Coding RNA Promotes Bacterial Persistence and Decreases Virulence by Regulating a Regulator in Staphylococcus aureus

Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal and an opportunistic pathogen that causes a large range of community and hospital-acquired infections. The bacteria produce an array of virulence factors, the expression of which is regulated by a set of regulators including proteins and RNAs. In recent years... Read More

Mycobacteriophages: Windows into Tuberculosis

Mycobacteriophages are viruses that infect mycobacterial hosts, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis. Mycobacteriophages display a remarkable genetic diversity. About 30 distinct types (called clusters, or singletons if they have no relatives) that share little or no nu... Read More

8 unusual uses for probiotics

Most of us are familiar with taking our daily probiotic supplement in the conventional way, either in capsule or powder form. It is however becoming increasingly apparent that people are discovering some weird and wonderful ways to use their probiotics, and here nutritional therapist Jo Saunders... Read More

Interview of Dr. Tim Sandle

Q) Dr. Tim Sandle, the well known researcher, professor, author and science communicator. It is much interesting for me to take an interview of an eminent person who is well known for the communicating science. Starting from your early childhood life, how you used to take science as that time?
... Read More

Fossil viruses preserved in hot spring bacteria

Fossilized microbes have provided scientists many clues about origins of life. By comparison, little attention is given to viruses in the fossil record. Although technically non-living, there is no question these tiny packets of protein-sheathed DNA have shaped the evolution of most life on eart... Read More

HIV gets the zinc finger

Because all animal viruses initiate infection by binding to a receptor on the cell surface, this step has long been considered a prime target for antiviral therapy. Unfortunately, drugs that block virus attachment to cells have never shown much promise. Another approach, which is to ablate the r... Read More

Frozen bacteria repair their DNA at -15ºC

Bacteria encased in ice can be resuscitated after thousands, perhaps even millions of years. How these hardy bugs manage to survive deep freeze is something of a mystery. If nothing else, the low levels of radiation hitting Earth’s surface should cause any ice-bound bacterium’s DNA to break apa... Read More

Thank Your Gut Bacteria For Making Chocolate 'Healthy'

Boy, it's a good time to be a dark chocolate lover.

We've noted before the growing evidence that a daily dose of the bitter bean may help reduce blood pressure. There also seems to be a link between a regular chocolate habit and lower body weight.

Now scientists are offering an explanation... Read More

Bacterial Reporters Get the Scoop - Engineered bacteria pave the way to living diagnostics and therapeutics

It’s a jungle in there. In the tightly woven ecosystem of the human gut, trillions of bacteria compete with one another on a daily basis while they sense and react to signals from the immune system, ingested food and other bacteria.

Problems arise when bad gut bugs overtake friendly ones, or... Read More

Turning Food Waste Into Fuel Takes Gumption And Trillions Of Bacteria

Every year, Americans send millions of tons of food to the landfill. What if you could use all of those pizza crusts and rotten vegetables to heat your home? That's already happening in one unlikely laboratory: the Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant in Brooklyn.

The plant's longtime sup... Read More

Hepatitis C Remains Major Problem for HIV Patients Despite Antiretroviral Therapy

A new study led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has found that the risk of hepatitis C-associated serious liver disease persists in HIV patients otherwise benefitting from antiretroviral therapy (ART) to treat HIV.

It has been suggested that... Read More

Laser Tags Salmonella in Less Than a Day

A new laser sensor identifies Salmonella bacteria grown from food samples in less than 24 hours, about three times faster than conventional methods.

“BARDOT allows us to detect Salmonella much earlier and more easily than current methods,” says Arun Bhunia, professor of food science at Purdue... Read More

Fighting antibiotic resistance with ‘molecular drill bits’

In response to drug-resistant “superbugs” that send millions of people to hospitals around the world, scientists are building tiny, “molecular drill bits” that kill bacteria by bursting through their protective cell walls. They presented some of the latest developments on these drill bits, bette... Read More

Three quarters of people with seasonal, pandemic flu have no symptoms

Around 1 in 5 of the population were infected in both recent outbreaks of seasonal flu and the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, but just 23% of these infections caused symptoms, and only 17% of people were ill enough to consult their doctor. These findings come from a major new community-based stud... Read More

The Surprising Way Bacteria 'Talks' To Each Other

Amidst the myriad of political mechanisms, resistance is the most known. From grassroots picketing to national boycotts to a mass of millions congregating in a country's capital, the practice of protest is as old as civilization. Venturing into the resistance world brings an entirely unique expe... Read More

The Bacterial Chromosome: A Physical Biologist's Apology. A Perspective.

I entered the bacterial chromosome field in 2004 as a fresh Ph.D. trained in theoretical physics. Ten years is not long enough for one to gain the depth and breadth of a scientific discipline of long history, certainly not for an early career scientist to write an essay of the status of A Mathem... Read More

Scientists Study What to Do If You Drop a Cookie on the Floor

Once again, you've dropped your snack. You bend down, snatch it up, and gently blow off any dust—and, you hope, deadly germs. You're about to put it in your mouth because, after all, you've got the "five-second rule" on your side: Food that's been dropped is safe to consume if it's been on the f... Read More

TWiV 276: Ramblers go viral



 Host: Vincent Racaniello


Guests: Sus... Read More

Fighting for oral dominance: Good fungi keep bad ones in check in healthy mouths

Human mouths contain a balanced mix of microbes which, when disrupted, can lead to oral diseases. A study published on March 13th in PLOS Pathogens compares the bacteria and fungi present in the mouths of healthy individuals with those from patients infected with HIV, and illustrates why oral ca... Read More

Immune Cells Need Each Other to Combat Deadly Lung-Invading Fungus

Although long recognized as an essential defense against the lung-invading fungus Asperfillus fumigatus, Neutrophils actually require a little help from fellow immune cells, according to a study by Amariliz Rivera, her colleagues at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School and scientists at the Fred Hu... Read More

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