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Slime molds and the future of artificial intelligence

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Justin Mullins, a consultant editor, for The New Scientist has published a very interesting read that ties research by Japanese scientists on the "cognitive" abilities of the slime mold Physarum polycephalum to memristors, "a class of passive two-terminal circuit elements that maintain a functional relationship between the time integrals of current and voltage" (Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memristor).

Why is is this interesting? As Mullins states:

"Within the past couple of years, memristors have morphed from obscure jargon into one of the hottest properties in physics. They've not only been made, but their unique capabilities might revolutionize consumer electronics. More than that, though, along with completing the jigsaw of electronics, they might solve the puzzle of how nature makes that most delicate and powerful of computers - the brain."

DARPA, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, also finds the possibilities of harnessing memristors intriguing. "In April last year, it announced the Systems of Neuromorphic Adaptive Plastic Scalable Electronics Program, SyNAPSE for short, to create "electronic neuromorphic machine technology that is scalable to biological levels".

Click "source" to read the article.
 
 

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