MicrobeWorld App

appsquarebannerad200x200

Join MicrobeWorld

Subscribe via Email

subscribe

Microbes After Hours

cheese-thumb-small

Click for more "Microbes After Hours" videos

Featured Image

Featured Video

Crowdsourced Microbes Heading to Station

Supporters

ASM House 200X200

Malaria-carrying mosquitoes might be splitting into new species

Image
By any other name, the Anopheles gambiae mosquito would still bear—with its tiny buzzing wingbeats—the deadly threat of malaria, which can be passed to humans in a single blood-sucking bite. But what if this species were to split in twain?

Two new studies, published online October 21 in Science, have found evidence that A. gambiae, which is one of the major carriers of the malaria parasite in sub-Saharan Africa, is evolving in two directions. The species has long been known to consist of several different subtypes of closely related mosquitoes. After careful genetic analysis, it appears that the Mopti (M) and Savanna (S) varieties of this insect might be on a path to become distinct species.

The two types are physically and developmentally "indistinguishable"—they have been observed "even flying in the same mating swarms," noted the researchers of one study. Only genetic differences reveal a difference between them.

"We can see that mosquitoes are evolving more quickly than we thought," Mara Lawniczak, of the Division of Cell and Molecular Biology at the Imperial College London and co-author of the first study, said in a prepared statement. She and her colleagues studied the genomes of the two varieties and detected more genetic differences between the two strains than would have been expected given their frequent geographical overlap.

The second group of researchers compared key genetic differences between these two A. gambiae types (in addition to the Bamako strain, which falls into the S subtype). Their study found that, based on genetic sites that seemed to have changed the most, the mosquitoes might be diverging in part due to habitat differences.
 
 

Comments (0)

Collections (0)

 

American Society for Microbiology
2012 1752 N Street, N.W. • Washington, DC 20036-2904 • (202) 737-3600
American Society For Microbiology © 2014   |   Privacy Policy   |   Terms of Use