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TWiM 13 Letters

Robin writes:

As a retired diagnostic radiologist, I have recently discovered twiv, twip, & twim, I greatly enjoy your discussions.

Don’t know how many students and graduate students who listen are aware of Layhe Bread, but all should be. The bread is better tasting than any bakery bread, incredible easy to make, doesn’t require a bread machine, and costs less than $0.50 a loaf. Because the dough doesn’t require kneading, my super-duper Zojirushi bread machine sits unused.

For most breads, the most expensive ingredient is the yeast, but Layhe Bread requires only a half teaspoon of yeast per loaf. The only other ingredients are 4 cups of flour, 2 cups of water, and 1 teaspoon of salt. Nothing else!

Believe it or not, the secret to making perfect loaves of bread every time is neglect and patience. Unlike other bread recipes, anaerobic bacteria begin working on the dough, imparting a slightly sour-dough flavor to the bread. The yeast are activated later. Don’t have clue what specific bacteria are involved. If one were asked to describe Layhe Bread in one sentence a good description would be cave-man bread.

It seems that there are many modifications and further simplifications of the Layhe technique. One of my own simplifications was doing away with wrapping the dough in a towel.

At any rate, Layhe is a baker who has a recipe book on how to make his bread. It would be probably a worthwhile investment for a group of students to go together to buy and to share one of his books.

Warm regards,

Robin

Suzanne writes:

Very interesting podcast! I loved the last one, too. I re-started the last one 5 times when I realized I was being too distracted by kids and life to pay close enough attention. It took me all week to find a quiet enough time to listen but I didn't give up.

When my oldest daughter was a baby and I was reading everything parent related I could find I ran across several articles mentioning that western countries tended to deal more with colic than some other societies. Mostly they tended to come to the conclusion that this was caused by parenting styles. I wondered at the time if there was a connection between colic and our microbe populations. I'd bet that if someone could show that inoculation with H pylori was correlated with a decrease in colic you'd have parents begging for a way to give it to their infants :-)

Thanks for the podcasts!

Suzanne

Raihan writes:

Hey guys, Imma avid listener to TWIV, TWIP and TWIM, and i would suggest a possible collaboration with another podcast i subscribe to: Star Talk Radio.

Its an astrophysics podcast hosted by Neil deGrasse Tyson himself. The topics covered in this podcast are vast but they often touch on the topic of life on other planets. They have suggested that if we do find life in the planets nearby, it'll most probably be microbial life.

That's when i thought of you guys! and i thought you guys are the experts on this and could possibly conjure up a magical conversation that will excite and stimulate biologists and astrophysicists alike. I know the tag line of your show is "the podcast that explores unseen life on EARTH' but i'm sure your listeners wouldn't mind an intergalactic detour.

I'm also gonna write a similar email to Star Talk Radio to tell them of your awesome podcast and lets all hope to benefit from a possible love child between biology and astrophysics.

Just a thought, keep up the amazing work

Raihan

 

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