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TWiM 44 Letters

Jeff writes:

Hi All - I am getting to the part of my Micro class where I have students analyze antibiograms and noticed a blog pointing to the attached paper. Forgive me if this topic (antibiogram data changing as a function of when samples are taken from a patient) has already been covered or commented on, but just in case, take a look. I particulary enjoy data tables showing "time to unreliability" and boy, things sure change fast in the ICU! I would be interested to hear a program about the "ecology of antibiotic resistance" in hospitals/clinics. I can think of reasons why resistance might vary depending on location within a hospital, but not being a clinical person I have no idea what the real reasons are. Forgive me if this too has been already featured.... teaching 5 classes and then coming home two young children keeps me chronically behind.

Love the program, thank you so much!

Here is the link - I don't know if it is copyright protected or not....

http://www.ccih.med.br/m/aluno/mod/biblioteca_virtual/revistas_2012/ICHE/Junho/0589.pdf

Jeff
Georgia Perimeter College

Katie writes:

Dear TWIM Doctors,

Thank you so much for your wonderful podcast.  I enjoy the entire TWI series, and I am thrilled that I finally have something to contribute!

In TWIM #43, a really interesting paper on bacterial caveolae was discussed. While this was amazing work, I do have to point out that being chock full of membrane vesicles is not unheard of in bacteria.  The photosynthetic purple nonsulfur bacteria (PNSB) Rhodobacter sphaeroides forms membrane vesicles in the cytoplasm to house its photosynthetic apparatus.  I have attached a paper with EM images (see Fig. 2 of the Adams and Hunter paper) showing how full these bacteria are with vesicles.  Beautiful studies by investigators such as Dr. Neil Hunter are beginning to uncover how these vesicles are formed, but there is still a lot that is not understood including what happens to these vesicles during division.  Another PNSB, Rhodopseudomonas palustris doesn’t form vesicles, but it does form lamellar membranes in the cytoplasm. If you look at the EM images in the second paper I attached, you can see that they have just a splash of cytoplasm. Considering how crowded the bacterial cytoplasm is already, it is really amazing!

Keep up the great work, and I look forward to the next podcast.

Cheers,
Katie

[she sent:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0005272812001703

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6343353 ]

Ayush writes:

Hello TWiM team,

I enjoy listening to you all every week. I apologize that my comment here is about not-so-recent TWiM (#30) about Burkholderia pseudomallei.  Some of you may know that that Melioidosis was perhaps described (Tapanuli fever) as a bioterror agent by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 'The Dying Detective'.  In this story, Sherlock Holmes was sent an unknown bacterium in mail to get him killed. Here is a paper describing Holmes' encounter with the bioweapon.

Please keep up the great work. I would strongly recommend TWiM as a must-listen for every microbiologist.

Alice writes:

Soil bacteria as source of drug resistance genes - does this have implications for nosocomial infection via contamination followed by gene swapping?

Glenn writes:

TWim podcast #11

I am wondering about the comment that was mentioned about the cutting board being the most dangerous tool in the kitchen. What is the best way to clean the cutting board? Also if one was to only use quick frozen chicken and cook it without pre-thawing. Will this keep one from acquiring the transfer of microbes from chickens to human by touch. I am assuming that by cooking all meats it kills all microbes.

Thanks,

Glenn

Glenn writes:

first I am really enjoying listening to TWiM and as a non-scientist you make the information about the micro world understandable. My question is related to TWiM podcast #16. I have several health issues that require me to take ibuprofen for pain and inflammation. How much concern should I have about the depletion of change in my gut and its ability to function properly.

thank you,

Glenn
 

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