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Bacteria Converted Into ‘mini-Factories’ For Biofuels and Vaccines

Scientists at the University of Kent and University College Cork have manipulated simple bacteria into constructing internal compartments where biofuels and vaccines can be produced.

These micro-compartments eventually occupy almost 70 percent of the available space in a bacteria cell, enabli... Read More

Insight into structure of HIV protein could aid drug design

A University of Iowa and University of Nebraska study has revealed the structure of an important HIV protein attached to the human protein that the virus hijacks during infection. The structural information might help researchers develop drugs that disrupt HIV replication. Image shows structure ... Read More

Why Patients Aren’t Getting the Shingles Vaccine

Four years ago at age 78, R., a retired professional known as much for her small-town Minnesotan resilience as her commitment to public service, developed a fleeting rash over her left chest. The rash, which turned out to be shingles, or herpes zoster, was hardly noticeable.

But the complica... Read More

Regulators urged to help develop antibiotics

U.S. regulators need to provide a clear path for drug companies to develop new antibiotics and should consider offering financial incentives, experts told a Congressional panel on Wednesday.

They said doctors are running out of effective antibiotics, yet inconsistent regulatory guidelines at ... Read More

Unraveling how bacteria motor along

Analysis of the protein structure of the 'motor' of motile bacteria at high resolution by Saori Maki-Yonekura and Koji Yonekura of the RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima, and Keiichi Namba of Osaka University has revealed the mechanism for transitioning between different movements.

The flagellum h... Read More

A new target for hepatitis C virus

When infection with hepatitis C virus goes from acute to chronic, severe liver disease may occur which requires organ transplantation. Nearly 200 million people are chronically infected with HCV, necessitating approaches to preventing and treating infections. No HCV vaccine is available, and cur... Read More

New strain behind meningitis cases in France

Medical scientists in France have seen a recent rise in cases of meningitis C caused by a virulent substrain of bacteria whose emergence in other European countries led health authorities to introduce routine vaccination against the disease. Reporting this month online in The Journal of Infectio... Read More

WVU Tech Selenium Process May Help Coal Industry

The selenium clock is ticking for mountaintop mining companies, as the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection prepares to crack down with water quality standards that producers have argued in the past are too expensive to meet.

But scientists at the West Virginia University Inst... Read More

Canadians track infectious disease threats at World Cup

Two Canadian researchers will be keeping a close eye on what hundreds of thousands of soccer fans take to the World Cup in South Africa _ and what they potentially bring home.

Dr. Kamran Khan, an infectious disease physician and scientist at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, and Dr. John Bro... Read More

Flu's Evolution Strategy Strikes Perfect Balance

Better understanding how the flu virus replicates and evolves to infect new hosts will help scientists find new ways to fight the flu. One option is the development of therapies that take advantage of the new findings by promoting mutagenesis -- treatments designed to generate increased mutation... Read More

Neck cancers are less likely to be fatal if caused by HPV, studies find

Cancers of the neck and throat are much less likely to be fatal if they are caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV) rather than alcohol and smoking, researchers reported Monday. But if the tumor is caused by HPV and the patient also smokes, survival is significantly impaired, they found.

Th... Read More

SALMONELLOSIS, SEROTYPE HVITTINGFOSS - USA: (ILLINOIS) RESTAURANT CHAIN

Salmonellosis linked to Subway restaurants continues to plague the
state line with 2 cases now reported in Winnebago County. Those who
got sick ate at a Subway in Machesney Park. That now brings the total
to 60 cases of salmonellosis related to this outbreak in Illinois.
Normally thi... Read More

BBC Podcast: Artificial Life

Synthetic biology hit the headlines when Craig Venter recently announced the creation of Synthia – the first organism with a computer as a parent.

JCVI-syn1.0, as the artificial microbe is officially known, will become a poster child for synthetic biology. But it was created from known geneti... Read More

Deep, dark secrets: Research goes underground

This is spelunking with a twist. This is academic spelunking that is uncovering answers to questions. It is cave exploration that is helping sharpen the skills of tomorrow’s microbiologists.

Welcome to Todd Sandrin’s classroom. The associate director of the New College Division of Mathematica... Read More

Gulf oil spill could widen, worsen ‘dead zone’

While an out-of-control gusher deep in the Gulf of Mexico fouls beaches and chokes marshland habitat, another threat could be growing below the oil-slicked surface.

The nation’s worst oil spill could worsen and expand the oxygen-starved region of the Gulf labeled “the dead zone” for its inhos... Read More

Plastic Antibody Works in First Tests in Living Animals

Scientists are reporting the first evidence that a plastic antibody -- an artificial version of the proteins produced by the body's immune system to recognize and fight infections and foreign substances -- works in the bloodstream of a living animal. The discovery, they suggest in a report in th... Read More

Q and A with Amy Gutmann of Presidential Commission for Study of Bioethical Issues

President Obama has appointed a new Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, replacing his predecessor's President's Council on Bioethics. Like the previous entity and similar ones before it, the group will advise the president on a wide range of difficult, controversial scien... Read More

Silent but Not Deadly: Muting Gene Quashes Ebola Infection

In fall 1976 the first recorded Ebola outbreak ravaged a small village in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (formerly Zaire). The virus, named for the river valley where it was found, causes a deadly hemorrhagic fever. It spread quickly via contact with blood and contaminated needles killing... Read More

Infection Control Lacking at Surgical Centers

Lapses in procedures aimed at fighting infections are common in ambulatory surgical centers, a study shows. The lapses include safe hygiene methods and improper handling of medications and equipment.

The study by the CDC is published in the June 9 issue of The Journal of the American Medical ... Read More

How Mast Cells Set Immune Defense on the Right Track

In the event of an infection, the immune system releases messenger substances. These molecules can either activate immune cells to defeat invading pathogens, or inhibit them to prevent an excessive immune reaction. For this, the immune system has to decide very quickly what mixture of activating... Read More

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