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CDC issues new guidelines on detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections

Today the United States (U.S.) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued new and important guidelines on the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB).

In these landmark guidelines, CDC advises that Interferon Gamma Release A... Read More

Researchers Identify What Makes MRSA Lethal

Scientists studying the so-called "superbug" MRSA have identified one of the components responsible for making it so deadly.

Staphylococcus aureus is a type of bacteria commonly found on the skin that is relatively harmless unless it gets into the bloodstream, where it can cause blood poisoni... Read More

BacterioFiles Episode 15

In this show, I report on three exciting stories: how viral invasions might've shaped human evolution, how bacteria are good for the immune system, and using viruses for medicine. Plus, biofuels special extravaganza!

{mp3remote}http://blip.tv/file/get/Bacteriofiles-015_2010_06_27_366.mp3{/mp3... Read More

MTS53 - Bonnie Bassler - The Bacterial Wiretap

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Will Oil-Eating Bacteria Plague the Gulf?

As though the Gulf Coast states don't have enough to worry about with crude oil spewing into the water at an estimated rate of 5,000 barrels a day, they soon may also have to worry about bacterial plumes. A microbe called Vibrio parahaemolyticus, common in warm coastal waters like the Gulf, thr... Read More

2-Billion-Year-Old Fossils May Be Earliest Known Multicellular Life

A newly discovered group of 2.1-billion-year-old fossil organisms may be the earliest known example of complex life on Earth. They could help scientists understand not just when higher life forms evolved, but why.

The fossils — flat discs almost 5 inches across, with scalloped edges and radia... Read More

Intelligence Averages Linked To Regional Infectious Disease Burden

Over the years, people have put forth a lot of theories to explain why intelligence differs, from person to person and even around the world. Health, wealth, schooling, nutrition, and even climate have all come up. Now, researchers at the University of New Mexico suggest that parasites might pla... Read More

The E.P.A. on Dispersants: Cure Is Not Worse Than the Disease

Initial tests of Corexit, the oil dispersant that BP is using in the Gulf of Mexico, and of competing products finds that the dispersants range from “practically nontoxic’’ to “slightly toxic,’’ the Environmental Protection Agency says.

In a conference call with reporters Wednesday afternoon,... Read More

Stem-cell therapy may provide new approach to fight infection

A new study shows that treatment with mesenchymal stem cells can triple survival rates in mice with sepsis, a deadly condition that can occur when an infection spreads throughout the body. The treatment reduced the damaging effects of inflammation and increased the body's ability to clear the in... Read More

Lack of sufficient iron may be a significant factor in controlling massive algae blooms

Lack of sufficient iron may be a significant factor in controlling massive blooms of Emiliania huxleyi, a globally important species of marine algae or phytoplankton, according to research led by researchers at the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) in Southampton.

Emiliania huxleyi is a spec... Read More

How clean are 3D movie glasses?

Click "source" to see a video report.

Many of the top grossing movies these days are in 3D. The Good Housekeeping Research Institute wanted to know just how clean those 3D glasses might be.

"Here at the Good Housekeeping Research Institute we just tested seven pairs of 3D glasses. We sent ... Read More

Deaths in the family cause bacteria to flee

Indiana University Bloomington biologists report in an upcoming issue of Molecular Microbiology that exposure to the extracellular DNA (eDNA) released by dying neighbors stops the sticky holdfasts of living Caulobacter from adhering to surfaces, preventing cells from joining bacterial biofilms. ... Read More

Listening to Bacteria - Bonnie Bassler

As Princeton microbiologist Bonnie Bassler assumes the presidency of the American Society of Microbiology, Natalie Angier of Smithsonian Magazine has written up a lengthy biographical piece on Bassler's career as a scientist and her focus on bacterial communication.

Here's a snippet from the ... Read More

Missouri VA hospital may have infected 1,800 veterans with HIV, hepatitis

A Missouri VA hospital is under fire because it may have exposed more than 1,800 veterans to life-threatening diseases such as hepatitis and HIV.

John Cochran VA Medical Center in St. Louis has recently mailed letters to 1,812 veterans telling them they could contract hepatitis B, hepatitis C... Read More

Riling up the immune system: P. aeruginosa polysaccharide facilitates inflammation

Being wrong isn’t always a bad thing. Take Christopher Columbus: he set out on his voyage expecting to find a shortcut to India, but landed an extended vacation in the Bahamas instead. The authors of an Observation piece just released in mBio were wrong about their assumptions, too, and although... Read More

Honey as an antibiotic: Scientists identify a secret ingredient in honey that kills bacteria

New research published in the July 2010 print edition of the FASEB Journal (http://www.fasebj.org) explains for the first time how honey kills bacteria. Specifically, the research shows that bees make a protein that they add to the honey, called defensin-1, which could one day be used to treat b... Read More

Indoor Mold Growth Is Influenced More by Location Than Building Type

In the first-ever global survey of indoor fungi scientists report that geography rather than building design and function has the greatest effect on the fungal species likely to be found indoors. The study suggests that the types of mold and other fungi most likely to be found in a dwelling may ... Read More

H1N1 deaths increase in India after onset of monsoon

Swine flu deaths continued their upwards surge since the onset of monsoon with 17 fatalities reported due to the disease in India since June 21, the maximum of which were from Kerala and Maharashtra.

Both the states reported seven deaths each while Andhra Pradesh reported two and Uttar Prades... Read More

NYU-Poly Professor Proposes Plan to Optimize Biosurfactants to Aid Gulf Cleanup

What if cleaning up the Gulf of Mexico wasn’t a matter of choosing between harsh chemical dispersants, labor-intensive skimming and potentially dangerous burns? Dr. Richard Gross, professor of chemical and biological science and Herman F. Mark chair at the Polytechnic Institute of New York Unive... Read More

Discovery of Controlled Swarm in Bacteria: Could Help Design New Strategies to Increase Sensitivity to Antibiotics

A study led by researchers from Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) describes one of the mechanisms in which pathogenic bacteria populations control the way they spread over the surface of the organs they infect and stop when they detect the presence of an antibiotic, only to resume again wh... Read More

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