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Freshman Biology Creative Projects!

I have found that students become involved, energized, and enthusiastic when I give them opportunities to explore topics in my classes using their own creative approaches and interests. So this semester, in my Biology 111 course at the University of Puget Sound, I found that students explored f... Read More

Small microbes almost killed all life on Earth, study suggests

Tiny microbes on the bottom of the ocean floor may have been responsible for the largest extinction event our planet has ever seen, according to a new study.

These microbes of death were so small, that 1 billion of them could fit in a thimble-full of ocean sediment, and yet, they were almost... Read More

Breastfeeding helps children grow friendly gut bacteria

The presence of lactic acid bacteria in intestinal flora is important for the healthy development of the immune system in children's early years. Now, a Danish study that tracked over 300 children in their first 3 years of life, found that longer breastfeeding encouraged lactic acid bacteria to ... Read More

TWiP 71 letters


Heather writes:


Hi Dr.s R&D,


I thought you might be interested in this news article about aquaculture in Hong Kong. Perhaps it's time for another fish parasite episode? I love the podcast, keep up the great work.


Heather


Bill writes: Read More

TWiP 71: Happy trails to you



Hosts: Vincent Racaniello and Dickson Despommier Read More

Where Biology and Art Work Together in the Classroom

In this blog entry, I describe how working with the artist Katie McKissick ("Beatrice the Biologist") helped improve my freshman biology course. The intersection of biology and art benefits both! Read More

Life on cheese: Scientists explore the cheese rind microbiome

Bacteria and moulds are vital to the ripening and aroma of many cheeses. Scientists from the Institute for Milk Hygiene, Milk Technology and Food Science at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna are working to identify the microorganisms that live on the rind of Vorarlberger Bergkäse, an... Read More

Ending the perfect storm: Protein key to beating flu pandemics

A protein called SOCS4 has been shown to act as a handbrake on the immune system's runaway reaction to flu infection, providing a possible means of minimizing the impact of flu pandemics. Scientists have found that without SOCS4 the immune response to influenza infection is slowed and there is a... Read More

Black Death May Have Improved European Health (video)

Researchers examined 600 skeletons in London and determined post-plague populations lived longer, healthier lives.

Click "source" to view video.

Video provided by Newsy. Read More

Antibiotic-Resistant Germs, Lying in Wait Everywhere

The Lechuguilla Cave in New Mexico is a network of chambers stretching 1,600 feet underground. The bacteria that grow on the walls of its most remote recesses have been living in complete isolation for more than four million years.

In 2010, Gerry Wright, a microbiologist at McMaster Universit... Read More

Scientists Add Letters to DNA’s Alphabet, Raising Hope and Fear

Scientists reported Wednesday that they had taken a significant step toward altering the fundamental alphabet of life — creating an organism with an expanded artificial genetic code in its DNA.

The accomplishment might eventually lead to organisms that can make medicines or industrial product... Read More

A Snippet: One Fungus, Two Bacteria

How often have you heard of two or more bacterial species coexisting within the same cell of a host? It’s known to happen with some frequency in some amebas, insects and other invertebrates (including the strange case of the mealybug bacteria, which have an endosymbiotic bacterium that carries a... Read More

Growth on Manital Salt Agar of Staphylococcus aureus and staphylococcus epidermis isolated from wounds

These clinical isolates are from Medinipur Medical College. Read More

Scientists Say Earth Bacteria Could Easily Colonize Mars

Researchers from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, in California, say bacteria from Earth could easily accompany astronauts to Mars, and could quickly colonize the planet.

Three different teams, researching how to sanitize the equipment going to other planets, discovered that some of the bact... Read More

asm2014: Five Things Not to Miss at ASM’s 114th General Session

You don’t want to miss asm2014. We’ve compiled a list of five things not to miss at the 114th American Society for Microbiology General Session.

Click the "source" link or copy/paste this URL into your browser: http://blog.puritanmedproducts.com/bid/383376/asm2014-Five-Things-Not-to-Miss-at-... Read More

Scientists add new letters to bacteria's genetic 'alphabet'

For possibly billions of years, the DNA blueprints for life on Earth have been written with just four genetic "letters" -- A, T, G and C. On Wednesday, scientists announced that that they added two more.

In a paper published in the journal Nature, bio-engineers at Scripps Research Institute i... Read More

Mass vaccination campaigns reduce the substantial burden of yellow fever in Africa

Yellow fever, an acute viral disease, is estimated to have been responsible for 78,000 deaths in Africa in 2013 according to new research. The research also estimates that recent mass vaccination campaigns against yellow fever have led to a 27 percent decrease in the burden of yellow fever acros... Read More

Study validates air sampling techniques to fight bioterrorism

Air and surface sampling techniques currently used by the US government are effective in fighting bioterrorism and potentially saving lives, a researcher finds. In 2005 and 2009, the Pentagon Force Protection Agency (PFPA) in order to simulate a deliberate attack, staged the release of a harmles... Read More

Native algae species to blame for 'rock snot' blooms in rivers worldwide

The recent blooms of the freshwater algae known as "rock snot" on river bottoms worldwide are caused by a native species responding to changing environmental conditions rather than by accidental introductions by fishermen or the emergence of a new genetic strain as widely believed, a Dartmouth C... Read More

EU worries over pig virus prompt new blood import rules

The EU Commission has agreed new rules to limit the spread of a deadly swine disease that has killed millions of piglets in the US.

Porcine Epidemic Diarrhoea virus (PEDv) has wiped out around 10% of the American herd in a year.

While the EU rejected an outright ban on live pig imports, it... Read More

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