MicrobeWorld App

appsquarebannerad200x200

Microbes After Hours

MWbannerEbola

Click for more "Microbes After Hours" videos

Join MicrobeWorld

Subscribe via Email

subscribe

Featured Image

Featured Video

Cohabitating-microbes

Supporters

ASM House 200X200

Dangerous enterohemorrhagic bacteria E. coli

Most Escherichia coli (E.coli) strains are harmless.But some, like enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), are a hazard to human health and life. Read More

More Evidence Shows Whooping Cough Evolving In Response To Its Vaccine

Researchers have found evolved pertussis, as whooping cough is scientifically known, in Finland, France, Italy, Japan and the U.S. As we previously reported, the evolved bacteria don't seem to be more dangerous than their predecessors. Nevertheless, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Preve... Read More

Apply Now! ASM Communications and Marketing Fellowship for 2015

 


Are you an early career scientist who is interested in public outreach? Do you want to share your love of microbiology with the world?  Consider applying to the American Society for Microbiology’s Headquarter Communications Fellowship.  This 6-month fellowship in Wash... Read More

TWiP 77: Mixed messages

Vincent and Dickson discuss the exchange of messenger RNAs between a parasitic plant and its hosts.


Hosts: Vincent Racaniello and Dickson Despommier Read More

TWiP 74 letters


voxsciurorum writes:


Dear water-based life forms:


It is 24 degrees in Overland Park, Kansas and I am looking at a slide labeled "Giardia lamblia", part of a museum exhibit on water and human (over) use of water.


I see a greenish lump. I don't know... Read More

New vaccines against an old disease: brucellosis

Brucellosis is a worldwide extended infectious disease of livestock (sheep, goats, cattle, cows, pigs, …) and remains one of the most common zoonotic infections, with more tan 500,000 new human cases worldwide every year. Control and eradication of brucellosis requires the use of animal vaccines... Read More

TWiM 75 Letters

 


Timothy writes:


Hello TWiMsters! I recently discovered the trifecta that is the TWi series, and now I can’t get enough of your discussions of all things micro. For graduate students like myself, keeping up with the scientific literature can all too easi... Read More

Scientists Study What to Do If You Drop a Cookie on the Floor

Once again, you've dropped your snack. You bend down, snatch it up, and gently blow off any dust—and, you hope, deadly germs. You're about to put it in your mouth because, after all, you've got the "five-second rule" on your side: Food that's been dropped is safe to consume if it's been on the f... Read More

SIM Media

Sulfur-indole-motility test (SIM media) results for:
(A) Escherichia coli: Motile***, hydrogen sulfide (-), indole (+)*
(B) Staphylococcus aureus: Non-motile, hydrogen sulfide (-), indole (-)
(C) Salmonella arizonae: Motile, hydrogen sulfide (+)**, indole (-)
(D) Enterobacter aerogenes: Mot... Read More

fluorescent from Chicago River!

A group of students (Adrienne Linzemann, Jose Aveja, Elsa quintero), staff (William Thompson), and faculty (Farahnaz Movahedzadeh) from Harold Washington College participated in Chicago River interdisciplinary project with the leadership of VP Margie Martyn, and isolated Pseudomonas fluorescens ... Read More

Gut bacteria may be best defense against nasty germs

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are on the rise, making it more and more difficult to treat infections. But research suggests that the best defense against harmful bugs could be a healthy population of “good” gut bacteria. The human relationship with microbial life is complicated. At almost any su... Read More

Fossil viruses preserved in hot spring bacteria

Fossilized microbes have provided scientists many clues about origins of life. By comparison, little attention is given to viruses in the fossil record. Although technically non-living, there is no question these tiny packets of protein-sheathed DNA have shaped the evolution of most life on eart... Read More

BacterioFiles 172 - Sunlight-Snackers Seize Sparks

This episode: Some photosynthetic bacteria can use electricity for their metabolism to make useful stuff too!


(9.2 MB, 10 minutes)


Show notes: 
News item 1... Read More

TWiM 73 Letters

Mark writes:


Hello Team TWiM,


I’ve followed with interest your coverage of Michael’s research into use of copper to fight hospital infection. Of all the interesting papers covered in 2013, I think the one most actionable is episode 55, The Copper Room. His res... Read More

TWiV 297: Ebola! Don't panic

The TWiVites present an all-ebolavirus episode, tackling virology, epidemiology, and approaches to prevention and cure that are in the pipeline.


Hosts: Vincent Racaniello Read More

At least 59 people dead in Guinea Ebola outbreak

An Ebola outbreak has killed at least 59 people in Guinea, UNICEF said, as the deadly hemorrhagic fever has quickly spread from southern communities in the West African nation.

Experts in the country had been unable to identify the disease, whose symptoms -- diarrhea, vomiting and fever -- we... Read More

TWiV 285: Hokies go viral

Vincent meets up with XJ Meng and Sarah McDonald at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg to talk about their work on viruses of swine and rotaviruses.


Host: Vincent Racaniello


Guests: Read More

Endospore Stain Bacillus cereus

B. cereus was grown on urea agar for 6 days at 37 degrees C to induce spore formation.
The endospore stain was done using malachite green as the primary stain and safranin as counter the stain. Malachite green was applied to the smear and set over a steaming water bath for 10 min (stain was no... Read More

BacterioFiles 180 - Phage Functions Fight Fortifications

This episode: Some phages can fight back against bacterial defenses with recently discovered genes!


(8.3 MB, 9 minutes)


Show notes: 
Journal Paper Read More

Scientists find coronavirus inhibitor blocking MERS and SARS

A team of European scientists say they have discovered a compound that can prevent the spreading of coronaviruses, responsible for the SARS and MERS outbreaks that have killed about 1,000 people worldwide.

A team of scientists led by Edward Trybala from the University of Gothenburg in Sweden,... Read More

American Society for Microbiology
2012 1752 N Street, N.W. • Washington, DC 20036-2904 • (202) 737-3600
American Society For Microbiology © 2014   |   Privacy Policy   |   Terms of Use