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E.coli on MacConkey Agar (Mac)

Streak plate isolation of E. coli on MacConkey Agar grown for 24 hrs at 37 degrees. E. coli demonstrates strong lactose fermentation indicated by the bright pink halo, bile precipitant around the colonies, and pink colony growth. Read More

TWiV 286: Boston TWiV party

Vincent and Alan meet up with Julie and Paul at the General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology in Boston, to talk about their work on the pathogenesis of poliovirus and measles virus.


Hosts: V... Read More

MWV Episode 85 - This Week in Virology #286: Boston TWiV Party

The Americ... Read More

ASM Live - The Live Internet Talk Show

Participate in ASM Live at ASM 2014 in Boston where we will be live streaming video interviews of select presenters with host Stan Maloy, Chair of the ... Read More

Gene discovery may halt a deep-rooted pepper disease

For more than a century, the global hot pepper industry has been dealing with a problem. A funguslike pathogen, known as Phytophthora capsici, has spread a root rot disease that severely diminishes crop yields. Despite highly adaptive management practices and the availability of wild pepper vari... Read More

Soil bacteria may provide clues to curbing antibiotic resistance

Drug-resistant bacteria annually sicken 2 million Americans and kill at least 23,000. A driving force behind this growing public health threat is the ability of bacteria to share genes that provide antibiotic resistance.

Bacteria that naturally live in the soil have a vast collection of gene... Read More

Fungi clean oil-polluted soil

Fungi can be harnessed to clean polluted soil which cannot be cleaned using traditional composting. This was the finding of Erica Winquist, M.Sc. (Tech.), in her dissertation for Aalto University.

Soil that has been polluted by organic pollutants such as oils can be treated by composting. How... Read More

Nasal bacteria may be predictor of skin infections

Bacteria found in the nose may be a key indicator for future development of skin and soft-tissue infections in remote areas of the body, researchers say. The nose is the primary S. aureus reservoir in humans and nearly 80% of the time, an individual's colonizing strain is the same strain that ca... Read More

Bird flu experiments pose risk of accidental release

Research in mammals that aims to prevent future influenza pandemics raises ethical, public health concerns. Experiments creating dangerous flu strains that are transmissible between mammals pose too great a risk to human life from potential release, according to an editorial by researchers from... Read More

Pictures Considered #17. The Meselson-Stahl Experiment

Described as the “Most Beautiful Experiment In Biology” the demonstration by Meselson and Stahl that DNA replicates semiconservatively is one of the major landmarks in the genesis of modern biology. And indeed it is most pleasing, both visually and cerebrally.

By semiconservative is meant tha... Read More

Microbe, enzyme or mineral? A riddle in the soil.

When you look at soil, you probably see dirt. When I look at soil, I see billions of microorganisms, crawling atop one another, consuming the dead in a feasting frenzy that stops for nothing save a deep freeze. I see microbes and their enzymes, the digestive juices that break down, transform and... Read More

Therapeutic teamwork: Coupling oncolytic viruses with immunotherapy to destroy tumor cells

A recent study by scientists at the Ludwig Center for Cancer Immunotherapy offers a new, multifaceted therapy for destroying tumors. A team of researchers led by Dmitriy Zamarin combined checkpoint blockade, a technique aimed at enhancing antitumor immune responses, with oncolytic viral therapy,... Read More

White House: CIA has ended use of vaccine programmes

The CIA has ended the use of vaccine programmes in its spying operations amid concerns for the safety of health workers, the White House has said.

In a letter to US public health schools, a White House aide said the CIA stopped such practices in August.

The CIA reportedly used a fake vacci... Read More

No, your urine is not sterile, new research finds

Bear Grylls, that intrepid survival expert from "Man vs. Wild," might want to rethink his penchant for drinking his own urine. Contrary to popular belief, new research shows that urine from an otherwise healthy person may not be as germ-free as we were led to believe.

“For years, actually for... Read More

Urine Is Not So Sterile After All, Bacteria Found In Urine Of Women With Overactive Bladder

Although urine has long-been thought to be sterile, a new study has found that not only can bacteria survive in urine – they are relatively prolific in women with overactive bladder (OAB).

“Doctors have been trained to believe that urine is germ-free,” said Linda Brubaker, dean of Loyola Univ... Read More

Germs in the Gut May Affect Autism, Study Finds

Bacteria living in the intestines and colon may affect symptoms of autism by breaking down important message-carrying chemicals, researchers reported Monday.

They found that children with autism have a very different make-up when it comes to gut germs, compared to children without autism. Mor... Read More

ASM GM 2014 - Microbes and Cancer

Until recently cancers were seen as lifestyle and genetic diseases, brought on by exposure to carcinogens or a mutated gene. Recent studies are linking microbes to many diffe... Read More

ASM GM 2014 - Fossilized Feces Help Anthropologists Understand Pre-Columbian Cultures

By evaluating the bacteria and fungi found in fossilized feces, microbiologists are providing evidence to help support archeologists' hypotheses regarding cultures living in the Caribbean over 1,500 years ago. Researchers discuss how the analysis of 1,500-year-old coprolites from archeologica... Read More

ASM GM 2014 - Where Pathogens Can Linger on Airplanes

Many air travelers are concerned about the risks of catching a disease from other passengers given the long time spent in crowded air cabins. New research shows disease-causing bacteria can linger on surfaces commonly found in airplane cabins for days, even up to a week. Participants discuss ... Read More

BacterioFiles 167 - Gut Grows Gluten Gluttons

This episode: Some bacteria in the guts of healthy volunteers are able to break down gluten!


(9.7 MB, 10.5 minutes)


Show notes: 
Jour... Read More

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