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Negative stain smallpox virus

Magnification 65,000X.

Smallpox is a serious, highly contagious, and sometimes fatal infectious viral disease. There is no specific treatment for smallpox disease, and the only prevention is a smallpox vaccination. Read More

Streptococcal bacteria

This image depicts the quantitative difference in hemolytic reactivity seen in a trypticase soy agar culture plate containing 5% sheep’s blood growing group-D Streptococci (left wedge), group-B Streptococci (middle wedge), and group-A Streptococci (right wedge) bacteria. This plate was grown u... Read More

Blastomyces dermatitidis

Blastomyces dermatitidis in giant cells. Fungi are usually numerous and below average size in these giant cells Read More

Histoplasma capsulatum

Histoplasma capsulatum in gingival tissue. GMS stain. (400X) Read More

Intestinal anthrax

Intestinal anthrax. Human case. Note edema of mucosa Read More

"The Unseen World"

Philadelphia artist Kate Kaman (www.katekaman.com) has designed a dynamic larger-than-life sculptural depiction of the most plentiful and ancient microscopic life forms -- bacteria. Suspended throughout an area measuring approximately 130 feet long, 27 feet wide and 41 feet tall, “The Unseen Wor... Read More

A dangerous bridge for Serratia.

Serratia spp. are widely distributed in nature. Serratia marcescens is the most common Serratia sp. associated with human disease, followed by strains of the S. liquefaciens complex: S. liquefaciens, S. grimesii and S. proteamaculans. The clinical significance of these species is largely unknown... Read More

Mycobacterium smegmatis Acid Fast Stain

Acid Fast stain done on a mix of Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium smegmatis. Carbol fuchsin was applied to the smear and set over a steaming water bath for 10 min to help penetrate the mycolic acid in the cell wall, then rinsed with acid alcohol which washes the carbol fuchsin out of al... Read More

Plasmodium vivax

Plasmodium vivax mature schizont (1000X) Read More

Salmonella

A photomicrograph of Salmonella bacteria. Courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Read More

Craterium minutum

Fluorescent image of the sporangium, an enclosure in which spores are formed, of the slime mold Craterium minutum. Honorable Mention, 2011 Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition®. Credit: Dr. Dalibor Matýsek, Mining University - Technical University of Ostrava, Ostrava, Czech Republic Read More

HELICOBACTER

Helicobacter pylori (yellow), a common bacterium that lives in the stomach lining, increases the risk of stomach cancer (brown cells) and peptic ulcers. But over time H. pylori can reduce stomach acid and acid reflux, which may help fend off esophageal cancer. The microbe also appears to help pr... Read More

Illustration of sites of embryonated egg inoculation

Illustration of sites of embryonated egg inoculation Read More

Arsenic Tolerant Plant

The sporophyte of the fern Pteris vittata, which tolerates and accumulates very high levels of the deadly toxin arsenic. Researchers from Purdue University have identified a gene (ACR3) from P. vittata that is necessary for the plant's tolerance to arsenic.

Jody Banks, professor of botany an... Read More

Quantitative precipitin test

Quantitative precipitin test. Constant antibody with 2-fold increase in antigen concentration. Note inhibition in antigen excess and precipitation in equivalence zone. Read More

Sebaldella termitidis bacteria

This digitally-colorized scanning electron micrograph (SEM) depicted a small grouping of Gram-negative Sebaldella termitidis bacteria.
Recently, “the genome of ATCC 33386 S. termitidis was recently sequenced as part of the U.S. Department of Energy - Joint Genome Institute’s (DOE-JGI) Genomic E... Read More

Zoonotic villains #6 - Streptococcus group C

Mmmmm, kinda looks like couscous right?
Well, though it might resemble a tasty side dish that's beloved in the Maghreb, it's actually a gnarly bacteria that causes URI's (upper respiratory infections) in both humans & animals.
Humans can prevent it by refraining from drinking unpasteurized mil... Read More

A Spotter's Guide to Human Viruses

The New Scientist has published a nifty gallery of "psychedelic"-like images of human viruses. Many of them are from Government agencies so they are public domain. Click "source" to view the entire collection.


Read More

Syncephalastrum sp

Syncephalastrum sp. Interference phase microscopy (1000X) Read More

Varicella lesions

Varicella lesions. Nine year old male (1X) Read More
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