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Plasmodium gallinaceum

This is a scanning electron micrograph of Plasmodium gallinaceum, which causes malaria in poultry, invading the midgut of the Aedes aegypti mosquito.
Credit: NIAID

"Fighting Drug-Resistant Malaria"
Rick Fairhurst and Others at NIAID Go Global
By Kristofor Langlais, NICHD, for the NIH Catal... Read More

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

Scanning electron micrograph of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and a dead human neutrophil. Credit: National Institutes of Health/Department of Health and Human Services (NIAID). Read More

Listeria monocytogenes against brain macrophages.

Listeria monocytogenes has a particular tropism for the central nervous system. To gain knowledge about the immune response elicited by L. monocytogenes in the brain, we used a rat ex-vivo organotypic nervous system culture as a model for Listeria infection. Brain sections were maintained severa... Read More

Micrococcus luteus line inoculation

Line inoculation of Micrococcus luteus on a TSA slant showing Filiform, uniform growth, along the margin. Culture was grown for 3 days at 37 degrees, M. luteus usually takes 3+ days for good growth. Read More

The results of a pour plate using Serratia marcescens as the inoculum

The results of a pour plate using Serratia marcescens as the inoculum. Taken from the Wistreich Collection, appearing exclusively on MicrobeWorld. Read More

Histoplasma capsulatum in mitral valve

Histoplasma capsulatum in mitral valve. Yeasts and rare hyphal growth in vivo Read More

Invisible Residents

The Human Microbiome Project has spent two years surveying bacteria and other microbes at different sites on 242 healthy people. The chart below hints at the complex combinations of microbes living in and on the human body.

The New York Times - Science Read More

Neisseria meningitidis

Neisseria meningitidis. Differential sugar reactions. (1-8) Read More

Rothia dentocariosa

Rothia dentocariosa. Granular microcolonies, 18 hour aerobic growth on trypticase soy agar (250X) Read More

Alcaligenes faecalis

Streak plate of Alcaligenes faecalis grown on TSA for 48 hr. Read More

Why we should wash our hands regularly #2

Because it isn't just for Establishment squares anymore!
As WellBee - debuted in 1964 - so aptly illustrates, (in a slightly dated style, considering the presence of readily available finger-nail toothpicks) simple hand washing is the most important tool available to prevent the spread of a who... Read More

Hepatitis B virions with Dane particles

This digitally-colorized transmission electron micrograph (TEM) revealed the presence of hepatitis B virions. The large round virions are known as Dane particles.

Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. Toxins, certain drugs, some diseases, heavy alcohol use, and bacterial and viral infec... Read More

Cryptococcus neoformans

Cryptococcus neoformans in solitary nodule. Gridley stain (400X) Read More

Salmonella typhimurium

This photograph depicts the colonial growth pattern displayed by Salmonella typhimurium bacteria cultured on a Hektoen enteric (HE) agar medium; S. typhimurium colonies grown on HE agar are blue-green in color, for this organism is a lactose non-fermenter, but it does produce hydrogen sulfide, (... Read More

Byssochlamys sp.

Byssochlamys sp. Penicillate sporulation (1008X) Read More

Tons of cucumbers discarded over E. coli fears

Click source to view images of workers throwing away cucumbers to be destroyed at an agriculture facility near Bucharest on Monday, June 6, as sales collapsed in Romania's markets due to the fear of E. coli contamination. Read More

Bacillus/Diplobacillus

Simple stain done on an unknown bacteria, showing feathery rhizoid growth on TSA after a 48 hr incubation at 37 degree’s C, isolated from a floor swab. Single bacillus and diplobacillus can be seen though out. Read More

Blastomyces dermatitidis

Blastomyces dermatitidis in pus from a dressing. Two characteristic budding cells are present. Note broad base building Read More

Beauty of Ecoli colony in EMB plate

Ecoli isolated from food sample in our laboratory Read More

Little brown bat: White-nose fungus

Little brown bat; close-up of nose with fungus, New York, Oct. 2008.
Credit: Photo courtesy Ryan von Linden/New York Department of Environmental Conservation

What is white-nose syndrome?
In February 2006 some 40 miles west of Albany, N.Y., a caver photographed hibernating bats with an unusu... Read More
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