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HIV-infected H9 T Cell

Scanning electron micrograph of an HIV-infected H9 T cell. Credit: National Institutes of Health/Department of Health and Human Services (NIAID). Read More

H1N1 Influenza Virus Particles

Colorized transmission electron micrograph showing H1N1 influenza virus particles. Surface proteins on the virus particles are shown in black. Credit: National Institutes of Health/Department of Health and Human Services (NIAID). Read More

10 fun facts about antibiotics

This poster has ten (10) mildly interesting facts about antibiotics, just in case you needed a poster or handout for Antibiotic Awareness Week (Nov 18-24, 2013). You can download PDF at "source" URL, above. Please feel free to share this graphic with your students, classmates, colleagues, frien... Read More

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

Scanning electron micrograph of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and a dead human neutrophil. Credit: National Institutes of Health/Department of Health and Human Services (NIAID). Read More

MERS-CoV

Transmission electron micrograph of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Credit: National Institutes of Health/Department of Health and Human Services (NIAID).

From the CDC:

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is viral respiratory illness first reported in Saudi Ara... Read More

Coxiella burnetii, the bacteria that cause Q fever

A dry fracture of a Vero cell exposing the contents of a vacuole where Coxiella burnetii are busy growing. Credit: National Institutes of Health/Department of Health and Human Services (NIAID). Read More

Slime mold Arcyria denudata

Arcyria called Cotton Candy Slime. A Myxomycetes 1 mm tall. Read More

Antibiotics work against viruses

Got your attention, eh? This page discusses why so many people believe that antibiotics kill viruses, and what you can do about that myth. Actually, it's not even a myth ... antibiotics DO work against viruses. The problem is that the word "antibiotics" is redefined by some to be a synonym of... Read More

To combat the overuse of antibacterials, stop using the absolutely terrible word, "antibiotic"

There are many reasons why bacteria evolve resistance to antibacterials, but one of the preventable reasons is the over-prescription of antibacterials to patients who don't have bacterial infections. But how to get people to stop asking for antibacterials? My suggestion is to stop using the wor... Read More

Chaetoceros debilis (marine diatom)

Chaetoceros debilis (marine diatom), a colonial plankton organism (250x). 1ST PLACE 2013 PHOTOMICROGRAPHY COMPETITION. Credit: Wim van Egmond, Micropolitan Museum, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Wim van Egmond compared Nikon’s Small World competition to “a colorful stained-glass window that opens... Read More

Paramecium

Paramecium sp. showing the nucleus, mouth and water expulsion vacuoles (40x). 4th Place 2013 PHOTOMICROGRAPHY COMPETITION, Nikon Small World

Credit: Rogelio Moreno Gill Read More

Rhizopus Stolonifer (Black bread mold) under magnification of 40X

black bread mold Read More

Human African trypanosomiasis

A false-coloured scanning electron microscope image of an African trypanosome, the parasite which causes sleeping sickness. Read More

Cartography of the Human Body

Artist Sonja Bäumel explores the skin microbiome in her project Cartography of the Human Body. Bacteria isolated from Bäumel’s skin were characterized and grown individually, then used to reconstruct an artificial microbiome with many layers of differently-colored species. Giant petri dishes gre... Read More

Spectacular Microscopic Art Is Also World-Changing Science

Fernan Federici’s microscopic images of plants, bacteria, and crystals are a classic example of finding art in unexpected places.

A couple years ago, Federici was working on his Ph.D. in biological sciences at Cambridge University studying self-organization, the process by which things organi... Read More

Some Observations on the Transformation of Self

Artist Anne Brodie, Microbiologist Dr Simon Park and Curator Dr Caterina Albano collaborated in researching the communication and light producing properties of bioluminescent bacteria outside of the usual confines of pure scientific practice. Over the course of 2009 and 2010 we developed a body ... Read More

Some Observations on the Transformation of Self

Artist Anne Brodie, Microbiologist Dr Simon Park and Curator Dr Caterina Albano collaborated in researching the communication and light producing properties of bioluminescent bacteria outside of the usual confines of pure scientific practice. Over the course of 2009 and 2010 we developed a body ... Read More

Media. Green and blue water colour and Serratia marcescens (red)

This is a joint project with water color artist Sarah Roberts to study the interaction of bacteria with traditional water colors. Many different types of bacteria have been assessed but only two so far, can be said to paint. When the white pigmented bacterium Proteus mirabilis, and the red Serra... Read More

Bacterial Artistry - Serratia marcesens

Serratia marcesens is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium that is commonly found in soil, water, on plants and in animals and thrives in damp conditions. This organism is well known for its production of the blood red pigment, prodigiosin. Production of prodigiosin can be influenced by several... Read More

STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS

The bug lives harmlessly in the noses of about a third of us. But it can turn rogue, causing skin infections—or worse. Heavy use of antibiotics since the middle of the last century has prompted the evolution of deadly superbug strains. Photograph by Martin Oeggerli, with support from School of L... Read More

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