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Wheat infected with ergot fungus

Confocal micrograph of wheat stigma hairs (blue) infected with ergot fungus (light pink). The stigma is the female part of the plant. The plant is fertilised by the (male) pollen grain, which sticks to a stigma hair causing growth of a pollen tube into the plant's ovary, causing an embryonic whe... Read More

Burkholderia cepacia

Scanning Electron Micrograph of Burkholderia cepacia.

Burkholderia cepacia is the name for a group or “complex” of bacteria that can be found in soil and water. B. cepacia bacteria are often resistant to common antibiotics.

B. cepacia poses little medical risk to healthy people. However,... Read More

Micrasterias denticulata

Micrasterias is a Desmid - a group of green algae mostly found in neutral to acidic fresh waters and sphagnum bogs. Most are unicellular, though a few form chain-like colonies. Each cell is constructed of 2 semicells which are mirror images of each other. In Micrasterias the cells are flattened ... Read More

Oral bacterial colonies, including Capnocytophaga and Aggregatibacter

This color-enhanced photomicrograph shows different species of bacteria that cause dental plaque - a colorless film that forms on teeth caused by the growth of bacterial colonies. Plaque develops naturally, and in most cases can be easily removed with regular brushing. However, if left it can ha... Read More

Treponema pallidum

Dark-field preparation of Treponema pallidum. (approx X1000). Taken from the Wistreich Collection, appearing exclusively on MicrobeWorld. Read More

Mucor sp. fungal organism

Under a magnification of 200x, and using a lactophenol cotton blue mount fixation technique, this photomicrograph reveals some of the ultrastructural morphology exhibited by a Mucor sp. fungal organism. This image depicts two sporangia, a mature structure, which had ruptured, releasing its conte... Read More

B. subtilis spores

Simple crystal violet stained preparation mainly consisting of B. subtilis spores with a few scattered rods. Taken from the Wistreich Collection, appearing exclusively on MicrobeWorld. Read More

it this synergism?

Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Imepinem did that wird zone next to ampicilin sulbactam. Wat phenomen are that? Its that synergism? And it wil have activity in vivo? Thnx


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Enterococcus faecalis

The bacterium, Enterococcus faecalis, which lives in the human gut, is just one type of microbe that will be studied as part of NIH's Human Microbiome Project. Read More

Pellicle on the surface of a broth medium

The presence of a pellicle on the surface of a broth medium. Taken from the Wistreich Collection, appearing exclusively on MicrobeWorld. Read More

A close-up view of a pour plate using Serratia marcescens as the inoculum.

bc5 - A close-up view of a pour plate using Serratia marcescens as the inoculum. A variety of colonial shapes can be seen. Taken from the Wistreich Collection, appearing exclusively on MicrobeWorld. Read More

Crystal violet stained cocci

Crystal violet stained cocci. Tetrads, and diplococcal and staphylococcal arrangements are present. (approx. 1000 X). Taken from the Wistreich Collection, appearing exclusively on MicrobeWorld. Read More

Penicillium stoloniferum virus in three dimensions

To help scientists understand how the Penicillium stoloniferum virus interacts with its hosts, and how it replicates and matures over its lifecycle, the virus structure was solved at the very high-resolution of 7.3 angstroms. Running the automated AUTO3DEM software on a San Diego Supercomputer C... Read More

Gram-stained preparation of Bacillus subtilis

Gram-stained preparation of Bacillus subtilis showing rods, and spores (empty areas). (approx. 1000 X). Taken from the Wistreich Collection, appearing exclusively on MicrobeWorld. Read More

Escherichia coli - tight junction disassembly

This pair of confocal micrographs demonstrates how a disease-causing strain of E. coli bacteria brings about diarrhoea by breaking down the waterproof barriers between the cells. The bacteria are seen as small red dots attached to the surface of intestinal cells making tiny pedestals out of one ... Read More

Bacteriophage P22

Cross-section through the center of a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of P22 phage, which is a virus that infects Salmonella bacteria. P22 contains many copies each of nine different viral proteins and a single copy of a double-stranded DNA genome (shown in green). The centrally located po... Read More

Colorized Marburg virus particles viewed with a transmission electron microscope

Marburg hemorrhagic fever (Marburg HF) is a rare, severe type of hemorrhagic fever which affects both humans and non-human primates. Caused by a genetically unique zoonotic (that is, animal-borne) RNA virus of the filovirus family, its recognition led to the creation of this virus family. The fi... Read More

Klebsiella pneumoniae

Large (about 5 mm in diameter), lactose positive colonies of Klebsiella pneumoniae on desoxycholate-citrate agar. Cultivation 37°C, 24 hours.

Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common source of hospital-acquired infections. Some of the strains can carry plasmids that harbour genes conferring resistan... Read More

Missing Carl Woese---RIP!

I comment a bit, as an educator, about the loss of Carl Woese. Not only the importance of his discoveries, but how he went about his work, remains of great value. Read More

Clostridium difficile

This is an image of Clostridium difficile colonies grown on cycloserine mannitol agar after 48 hours.

C. difficile, an anaerobic gram-positive rod, is the most frequently identified cause of Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea (AAC). It accounts for approximately 15-25% of all episodes of AAC.

... Read More

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