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Looks like we’re still looking for earthly life forms on other planets

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In late 2010, NASA set the Internet buzzing when it called a press conference to discuss an astrobiological finding that would impact the search for extraterrestrial life. Many speculated that some primitive life had been found on Mars or one of Saturn’s moons. But the evidence was found on Earth; a strain of bacteria in California’s Lake Mono that had arsenic in its genetic structure. The discovery implied that life could thrive without the elements NASA typically looks for, mainly carbon and phosphorous. But now, a new study challenges the existence of arsenic-based life forms.


The 2010 paper announcing arsenic based life, “Arsenic-eating microbe may redefine chemistry of life,” was written by a team of scientists led by Felisa Wolfe-Simon. The paper appeared in Science and refuted the long-held assumption that all living things need phosphorus to function, as well as other elements including carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen.

The phosphate ion plays several essential roles in cells: it maintains the structure of DNA and RNA, it combines with lipids to make cell membranes, and it transports energy within the cell through the molecule adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Finding a bacteria that uses normally poisonous arsenic in the place of phosphate shook up the guidelines that have structured NASA’s search for life on other worlds.

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