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Genome Blueprint for Horse and Human Vaccines

Two strains of Streptococcus bacteria, that have evolved to cause potentially fatal infections in either horses or humans, use the same box of tricks to cause disease. Exploiting their genetic similarities could lead to novel vaccines for both man and beast, according to a review published in the Journal of Medical Microbiology.

Streptococcus pyogenes is responsible for tonsillitis, scarlet fever and toxic shock syndrome in humans. Its equine equivalent, Streptococcus equi, infects horses to cause a disease called strangles. Each strain is well-adapted to their particular host yet their strategies for causing disease are remarkably similar.

Strangles is one of the most frequently diagnosed infectious diseases of horses worldwide. There are estimated to be more than 600 outbreaks in the UK each year, each costing up to many thousands of pounds to resolve. Streptococcus equi infects the lymph nodes in the head and the neck leading to abscesses that can restrict the airways -- giving the disease its name.

Click "source" for entire article.

"Streptococcus equi: a pathogen restricted to one host" (http://jmm.sgmjournals.org/content/early/2011/07/14/jmm.0.028233-0.abstract?sid=f63cd474-9674-4060-9009-66c606c11493)
 
 

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