MicrobeWorld App

appsquarebannerad200x200

Join MicrobeWorld

Subscribe via Email

subscribe

Microbes After Hours

cheese-thumb-small

Click for more "Microbes After Hours" videos

Featured Image

Featured Video

Crowdsourced Microbes Heading to Station

Supporters

ASM House 200X200

Warning: imagecreatefromstring(): Data is not in a recognized format in /var/www/plugins/content/jlembed/jlembed.php on line 253 Warning: imagesx(): supplied argument is not a valid Image resource in /var/www/plugins/content/jlembed/jlembed.php on line 254 Warning: imagedestroy(): supplied argument is not a valid Image resource in /var/www/plugins/content/jlembed/jlembed.php on line 255

Sequencing Wasp Genome Sheds New Light on Sexual Parasite

About 100 million years ago, the bacterium Wolbachia came up with a trick that has made it one of the most successful parasites in the animal kingdom: It evolved the ability to manipulate the sex lives of its hosts.

"When it developed this capability, Wolbachia spread rapidly among the world's populations of insects, mites, spiders and nematodes, producing the greatest pandemic in the history of life," says Seth Bordenstein, assistant professor of biological sciences at Vanderbilt, who is studying the relationship between this parasitic bacteria and Nasonia, a genus of small wasps that prey on various species of flies, including houseflies, blowflies and flesh flies.

Bordenstein is a member of the Nasonia Genome Working Group, a collaboration of scientists who published the complete genomes of three species of Nasonia in the January 15 issue of the journal Science. In the paper the group identifies several genes that the wasps appear to have picked up from the bacteria.
 
 

Comments (0)

Collections (0)

 

American Society for Microbiology
2012 1752 N Street, N.W. • Washington, DC 20036-2904 • (202) 737-3600
American Society For Microbiology © 2014   |   Privacy Policy   |   Terms of Use