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Once-Chronic Peptic Ulcers Now Curable

Frustrated by responses to his research, 33-year-old Barry Marshall, MBBS, ingested Helicobacter pylori one day in 1984, and soon developed stomach pain, nausea, and vomiting: all signs of the gastritis he had intended to induce.

"I didn't actually expect to become as ill as I did," he wrote in an autobiography, describing a defining moment in the work that ultimately led to the 2005 Nobel Prize he shared with a now-retired colleague, Robin Warren, MBBS.

The award had its roots in two papers published in The Lancet in 1983 and 1984. In those articles, Warren and Marshall, now at the University of Western Australia in Perth, described an association between a new bacterium that would eventually be named H. pylori and peptic ulcers, both duodenal and gastric.
 
 

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