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Bacterial cellulose may help develop artificial blood vessels

In a novel study, researchers from University of Gothenburg, Sweden have found that the cellulose produced by bacteria could be used to develop artificial blood vessels in the future.

They say that bacterial cellulose carries a lower risk of blood clots than the synthetic materials currently used for bypass operations.

Produced by a bacterium known as Acetobacter xylinum, the cellulose is strong enough to cope with blood pressure and works well with the body's own tissue.

"There are hardly any blood clots at all with the bacterial cellulose, and the blood coagulates much more slowly than with the materials I used as a comparison," said molecular biologist Helen Fink.

"This means that the cellulose works very well in contact with the blood and is a very interesting alternative for artificial blood vessels," Fink added.
 
 

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