MicrobeWorld App

appsquarebannerad200x200

Join MicrobeWorld

Subscribe via Email

subscribe

Microbes After Hours

MW-Site-Banner-200x200

Click for more "Microbes After Hours" videos

Featured Image

Featured Video

Crowdsourced Microbes Heading to Station

Supporters

ASM House 200X200

Warning: imagecreatefromstring(): Data is not in a recognized format in /var/www/plugins/content/jlembed/jlembed.php on line 253 Warning: imagesx(): supplied argument is not a valid Image resource in /var/www/plugins/content/jlembed/jlembed.php on line 254 Warning: imagedestroy(): supplied argument is not a valid Image resource in /var/www/plugins/content/jlembed/jlembed.php on line 255

Food-Borne Illness: Researchers Redefine the Invasion Mechanism of Salmonella

Bacteria of the genus Salmonella cause most food-borne illnesses. The bacteria attach to cells of the intestinal wall and induce their own ingestion by cells of the intestinal epithelium. Up till now, researchers assumed that Salmonella have to induce the formation of distinctive membrane waves in order to invade these gut cells. Researchers from the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research in Braunschweig, Germany, now refuted this common doctrine.

"Based on our data, the molecular mechanism of infection employed by Salmonella has to be revised," says Klemens Rottner, head of the HZI research group "Cytoskeleton Dynamics." The group's results have now been published in the current issue of the scientific journal Cellular Microbiology.

Salmonella are highly adaptive bacteria. They can live in the presence and absence of oxygen and thus propagate in the gut. The ingestion by humans occurs mainly via contaminated egg dishes such as mayonnaise or raw milk products as well as meat or sausages. Infections with Salmonella lead to severe diarrhea and fever, particularly in patients harbouring a compromised immune system.
 
 

Comments (0)

Collections (0)

 

American Society for Microbiology
2012 1752 N Street, N.W. • Washington, DC 20036-2904 • (202) 737-3600
American Society For Microbiology © 2014   |   Privacy Policy   |   Terms of Use